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Jeff Über Admin

I am a mean boss ⬆️⬆️⬇️⬇️⬅️➡️⬅️➡️??

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6th April 2000

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#1 12 years ago

Voltron style

Computer Security Expert Testifies that the RIAA Can't Identify Users by IP Address

In Arista v. Does 1-11, the RIAA is trying to subpoena the names and addresses of 11 Oklahoma State University students accused of copyright infringement, but several of the students are trying to vacate the order by arguing the fact that the RIAA's use of IP addresses is based on the assumption that it's a unique means of identification, which it's not.

To assist in proving their argument that a person cannot be uniquely identified by an IP address they have enlisted the expert testimony of Jayson E. Street, CISO of Stratagem 1 Solutions in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and recognized computer security and forensics expert.

In a 15 page expert witness declaration submitted to the court, Jayson essentially attacks the entire premise of the RIAA's lawsuit which is that an IP address can be used to uniquely identify an individual. He calls this assertion "factually erroneous" and "misleading,"

For the RIAA first argues that "Users of P2P networks can be identified by their IP addresses because each computer or network device(such as a router) that connects to a P2P network must have a unique IP address within the internet to deliver files from one computer or network to another."

Jayson counters that "In my opinion, the above statement is factually erroneous."

He continues by pointing out that "An individual cannot be uniquely identified by an IP address," and that "...networks of networks can have many duplicate addresses." due to the fact that all connected computers reside behind the same control, or access point.

The RIAA also argues that "Two Computers cannot effectively function if they are connected to the Internet with the same IP address at the same time."

Jayson again calls their statements "factually erroneous" by pointing out that they can if they are located behind the same control points "...such as routers, fire walls, proxy servers, or similar technologies."

The RIAA even goes so far as to try and compare the internet to the "...telephone system where each location has a unique number," and whereby "...only one call can be placed at a time to or from that home."

Jayson, much to his credit, take this statement to task, calling it "misleading" due to the fact that "A telephone network is a circuit-switched network " that "...creates or removes a circuit or end-to end link between the two devices that wish to communicate."

"The internet," he points out, "is not a circuit-switch network. Instead, it is a packet-switched network."

"In such a network individual packets are created by the end point devices and deposited onto the network with destination information, " he says. "Control devices within the network can then decide which path the individual packets will take across the network. Not all packets will necessarily take the same path. As such in a given network, there can be many simultaneous communication stream that are presented through a single control point ana all logged as coming from a single IP address."

How's that for a rebuttal?

The RIAA's singular most important method of "identifying" individuals, the IP address, is basically proven to be an "erroneous" and "misleading" means of proving that an end user is responsible beyond all doubt, thus allowing the merits of current and future lawsuits against individuals to be called into question.

Don't you just love the smell of victory in the morning?

I do.. the RIAA and all of their lawyers and other moron exec's need to just burn in hell and do the world a huge favor by getting there quickly.


Product Manager | GameFront.com




Maeko

Insipid

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13th October 2005

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#2 12 years ago

Good news for college students wanting to download copyrighted materials I guess lol.

But the experts defense is quite logical




Jeff Über Admin

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#3 12 years ago

I see it as stopping the RIAA from constantly sueing everyone, including many who were wrongly accused to begin with due to the inaccuracy in their method to verify who is doing it by IP address.


Product Manager | GameFront.com




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#4 12 years ago

If they had any brains they'd follow the MAC address. But then again, it might be rather difficult to secure a subpoena to go around checking individual machines for their MACs...




Pb2Au

Droolworthy

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4th October 2004

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#5 12 years ago

I wasn't under the impression that MAC addresses were logged by the majority of P2P programs, so I doubt it would be possible for the RIAA to find records of MAC addresses connecting to illegal file servers.




colonel_bob

Here & There

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4th June 2004

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#6 12 years ago

Oh yes. Awsomeness. The RIAA can DIAF. There were several people at my school who got those "warning letters, and I know a few of them.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#7 12 years ago

Heh nice, though I do hope that th RIAA did more then just tracing IPs not? Tracking it would be a good start for an investigation but obviously it wouldn't single out a single computer. And even then, how would they prove who used that computer? Bust in the door and catch somebody behind a computer (that is being used for illegal activities) red handed?




Maeko

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13th October 2005

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#8 12 years ago
n0e;3865204I see it as stopping the RIAA from constantly sueing everyone, including many who were wrongly accused to begin with due to the inaccuracy in their method to verify who is doing it by IP address.

yea thats what I meant lol




Pb2Au

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4th October 2004

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#9 12 years ago

This war on illegal downloading is just like Prohibition: the technically illegal activity is too popular to combat using the judicial system of the United States and any action to stop it will be ineffectual until its eventual collapse and acceptance of downloading.




Tango Protocol

Master of my own domain

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18th July 2003

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#10 12 years ago

I wish the RIAA would stop trying to know what they are talking about.