Some South Carolina Possible Tornadoes Yesterday (Radar Pictures). 14 replies

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Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#1 13 years ago

Hey. We had some possible supercells in SC create some possible tornadoes. Anyone near these things? If so, did you see a tornado. Thought this would be an interesting topic. (I will make up the pictures with the Mesos* and TVS's* in them and post them as soon as I can. Hang tight!) *Mesocyclones *Tornado Vortex Signatures




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#2 13 years ago

Here is a radar picture of some of the Mesos and TVS's present that day. This may not be all of them, and I may have circled some that may not be mesos. I'll post some more detailed and analyzed pictures later. Here is the first picture of the possibly tornadoes that day. (It may be too large so it is attached as well). attachment.php?attachmentid=31377&stc=1




Μαjïç MushrøøM

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#3 13 years ago

Interesting...it has been rather gusty around here (S. California) lately as well.




Guyver VIP Member

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#4 13 years ago

I haven't noticed anything other than a bit of rain here in SC. BTW whats the name of that program Killer Kyle and where can I obtain it if possible?




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#5 13 years ago

Where do you live at, Guyver. I was in the "My Pad at CU" point at the time (which is at Clemson, though the Clemson point, which is not visible there, is slightly below the "My Pad at CU" one). The program I have is called Stormlab. You can find it at http://www.interwarn.com/ You do get a free trial based on which Stormlab you want to try (I have the basic Stormlab). If you want to buy it, it is like $99.95 for the basic version and maybe $179.95 for the professional version (If you downloaded the trial and wanted to buy it. Getting a CD costs $10 more. It is all on the website). You will have to fill out some stuff but they will send the registration code to you and you will be set. It is a very neat program that I found very fun and useful since I got it last summer, and I became more useful after my Skywarn training classes and having more experience and learning more on how to read the various radar images. I will try to assemble some .gif images of the storms of the reflectivities (rain) and velocities (like what you see above) and try to point out the potentially tornadic storms and the mesos and TVSs (Stormlab's storm data table feature that comes up with the composite image is very useful for tracking the storm rotations (the ones the computer can identify as well as maybe using it with other radars to find the other rotations)). EDIT: I forgot to mention that that radar image is an archived one. Stormlab saves radar images, which is also very useful. (This is not an intentional sales pitch, just telling you what it can do). I do want to warn you, though, that it may have a minor glitch that freezes Stormlab from time to time (especially if a lot of radars are running, I think the program trying to download too much at once causes it, but this can be fixed by opening radar images at intervals). If it occurs, all you have to do is end the program and restart it. No other harm is done by this glitch.




Guyver VIP Member

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#6 13 years ago

Very nice, thanks for the info Killer Kyle. I live in Simpsonville which is not very far from Greenville.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#7 13 years ago

No problem. I should have those .gif animations up in a couple of days or so. EDIT: Yeah. I found simpsonville on the radar. You are near the KGSP radar, so it makes the image look a little wierd. You can see where the radar is (it is in the center of the blank circle, which is known as the radar's cone of silence). attachment.php?attachmentid=31419&stc=1




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#8 13 years ago

I am still working on those .gif animations. I should have them done some time soon. I just wanted to say that at least one of those tornadoes in SC were confirmed (or at least sighted). Nothing else is available about any other possible tornadoes in SC. There were also 2 other tornado reports that day. Time,F-Scale,Location,County,State,Lat,Lon,Comments 1907,UNK,WAGGONER,MONTGOMERY,IL,39.38,-89.65,BRIEF TOUCHDOWN NEAR I-55 AT COLDFIELD REST AREA. (LSX) [color=Red] 2215,UNK,9 SSE ANDERSON,ANDERSON,SC,34.4,-82.59,PUBLIC REPORTED VISUAL ON TORNADO. NO DETAILS ON DAMAGE. (GSP)[/color]

0014,UNK,10 SSE WALTONVILLE,FRANKLIN,IL,38.08,-88.97,UNCONFIRMED. (PAH) The red one is the confirmed SC tornado. I'll post more information and the gifs when I have them.




CartmanX

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#9 13 years ago

You can definately see a hook on part of that cell.....for those who dont know the hook on a doppler radar image indicates that there is possible rotation in that cell.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#10 13 years ago

That reflectivity picture up there is not the entire radar image. That storm was not tornadic, I believe. You are correct about hook echos, though They can appear on any radar, but are not as useful for tornado detection as velocity images are since not all tornadoes have associated hook echoes. Velocity images allow for easier detection of possible tornadoes and may even catch more of them, and thus can give more warning time to people since they actually see the rotation in the thunderstorm. Hook echoes are associated almost exclusively with supercells, though some may be hard to see and Low precipitation supercells may not even have hook echoes, since precip is required around the rotation for there to be a hook. I think some non-supercells can have hook echoes, but they usually form during or after tornado formation, but I am not sure of this exactly. But velocity scans are not perfect, either, as they also do not catch all tornadoes and can give false alarms sometimes (computer gives one, but a trained radar technician can usually tell the difference between a fake and real rotation. They can also find rotations not seen by the computer). But observing hook echoes with storms is a good way of seeing that a storm has a potential tornado. I think that both methods are used to find possible tornadoes, since a hook may not have an associated rotation visible on the velocity scans but have a tornado and a real rotation and vice versa, and thus help meteorologists out with detection, warnings, and analysis. Hook echoes are also useful for other things as well. There were definite hook echoes with some of those storms that day. I can fix up the reflectivity gif and you can see for yourself. I do not know if those were actual supercells, but judging from how those particular storms looked and acted on the radar, I would say that they were.




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