Talk about where you live. 100 replies

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Fortune

something to believe.

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19th February 2005

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#1 12 years ago

Well, go ahead... tell whatever stories about your town you like... I just learned something pretty cool, the town I live in is pretty small, pretty ordinary for Iowa, nice people.. farmlands surrounding. And I just now found out that during WW2 ( And after of course ) there was a German POW Camp here! http://www.pwcamp.algona.org/ Picture of the POW camp. picfull_2.jpg I may post more later. Go ahead and post any stary facts about the place you live.. there hasnt been one of these threads ( To my Knowlede ) for awhile, so just post whatever.




GOD111

I Am Teh God

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1st July 2004

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#2 12 years ago

Google Copenhagen:)




Fortune

something to believe.

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19th February 2005

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#3 12 years ago

.........

Post, not link.

Anyways, heres a couple tidbits about one of the prisoners.

Friedrich BiallasI was drafted October 1942 to the Army, Infantry Replacement Bataillon 497 to Bernburg/Saale. Training in Ronse (Renaix) in Belgium. I made the acquaintance with the laterite of Flanders. Our quarters were in a Gymnasium. A part of the unit took part during the occupation of Southern France, for this purpose bicycles were impounded from the population which were returned three weeks later on. In January 1943 we were transferred to Tournai (1 week) then to the Senne Camp near Paderborn. Here we were equipped as harnessed unit with horses and wagons for deployment against the Sovjet Union. Suddenly, however, we received march orders for Italy as replacement for the 90th light Division, which had capitulated in Africa. After the journey over the Alps and a stay at Livorno we took passage to Sardinia: and were in a tent camp at the Monte Limas between Gonnosfenadiga and Villacidro in the Southwestern part of the island until September. Then from Santa Teresa in the Northern part of the island passage to Corsica (Porto Vecchio). The entire cartage park was left behind on the road to the port of Santa Teresa. Thereupon by plane (Ju 52) from Bastia to Pisa (Italy). At Venice the unit was equipped anew and during November departure to the combat mission near Pescara at the Adriatic Sea. Here we were supposed to stop the forward movement of the Englishmen at Sangro, a river at the coast. We couldn’t make it: During daytime we were hiding, during the night we usually retreated.[/QUOTE]

Same personI was captured by the British Army December 3, 1943 along with a group of 5 or 6 men. The treatment was correct, also during interrogations. Food supply was plain, just biscuits and tea with milk, twice per day.[/QUOTE]

[QUOTE=Same...]To and from the camp we were transported with a large truck. The driver, approximately 50 years, was called Doc, because he wore eyeglasses. It required about one hour’s drive on a straight-line road through the hilly landscape. Our foreman was oftenly Earl White. All treated us very correctly, almost in an obliging manner. Only once, an elderly woman did let me feel that I belong to the Nazis, her enemies. Then her face reddened she became embarrassed and I noticed, she felt sorry.

[QUOTE=.....]On a farm shortly before the maize blossoming we had to draw lines of the maize plants. The farmer, riding high on a horse, always tried to keep an eye on us, because we could hardly be seen in the highly grown maize plants. But nobody was in the mood for any extravagances. The camp life passed, apart from a few exceptions, in the same manner. Food was very good and plentiful. The kitchen crew even tried to stockpile food to forestall “bad times”. Pretty soon, however, the camp commander found this out and arranged to remove it. Every camp inmate received a tart from the kitchen sergeant on his birthday.

I'll bore you with more later.




Lord Wiener VIP Member

Piercing the veil.

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9th August 2003

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#4 12 years ago

I live in Monheim-Baumberg, it's a pretty quiet suburb. Basic amenities are pretty close, and I drive about 20 minutes to get to work in the next larger city, Leverkusen. The big cities, Cologne and Düsseldorf, aren't too far away either, I'm pretty much in between.


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DavetheFo

RogueDevil / Rogue Angel

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29th May 2003

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#5 12 years ago
Nuneaton is a town in the English county of Warwickshire, and the borough of Nuneaton and Bedworth. The town is located roughly 8 miles (12 km) north of Coventry and 20 miles (32 km) east of Birmingham. Nuneaton has a population of 70,721 (2001 census). The town is near the M6 and M69 motorways, and the A5 road. It is also an important railway junction, served by the West Coast Main Line and also by the Birmingham to Leicester railway line, and by a line to Coventry via Bedworth. The Coventry Canal and the River Anker run through the town. Places near to Nuneaton include Atherstone, Bedworth, Coventry and Hinckley. Nuneaton is most famous for its associations with the 19th century author George Eliot, who was born on a farm on the Arbury Estate just outside Nuneaton in 1819 and lived in the town for much of her early life. Nuneaton is also the birthplace of film director Ken Loach, and the former "standards and morality" campaigner Mary Whitehouse. It was also the home of the comedian and game show host Larry Grayson, and of footballer Nigel Winterburn.

They make the place sound a lot better than it is.




Lord Wiener VIP Member

Piercing the veil.

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9th August 2003

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#6 12 years ago

Oh, wikipedia. Of course. Here, knock yourselves out.

Monheim am Rhein is a North-Rhine-Westphalian (Germany) medium-sized municipality in the district of Mettmann in the southern suburban area of Düsseldorf on the eastern (right) bank of the river Rhine. It consists of the city districts (from north to south) Baumberg (about one third) and Monheim (two thirds).

Monheim_am_Rhein_Wappen.pngLage_der_Stadt_Monheim_am_Rhein_in_Deutschland.png

Adjacent Cities and districts

The following cities and districts border Monheim am Rhein: To the north Düsseldorf, to the east Langenfeld (also part of the district of Mettmann), to the south Leverkusen and (both divided by the river Rhine) Cologne to the southwest and Dormagen to the west (part of the district of Neuss).

History

Monheim has approximately 850 years of recorded history. It was first documented in 1150 as a fishermen's village in the Grafschaft (Earldom) Berg. It became the administrative center for the surrounding villages (including many of the villages that now form Düsseldorf) in 1363, and stayed in that position until Napoleon formed the Rhine Confederation in 1806. Monheim, Baumberg and Hitdorf were than combined to a municipal corporation. Monheim has gained city status in 1960, ten years after it finally incorporated the neighbouring villages Baumberg and Hitdorf. At the end of 1974 Monheim was incorporated by Düsseldorf as part of a major municipal corporation reform. After a successful complaint at the federal state's constitutional court in Münster, the city became independent again on 1 July 1976, but lost Hitdorf to Leverkusen. Since 1994 the official city name is Monheim am Rhein.


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Nusentinsaino

A new sense of nuisance.

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8th December 2003

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#7 12 years ago

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athens%2C_Ohio

Boring article, but it's an awesome town if you actually set foot there. Home to the Athens Halloween Block Party... where 10+ thousands of people come to celebrate halloween. (Mostly wild college students).




Homer Gonerson

...

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22nd December 2003

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#8 12 years ago

Well, I just found this out. There really is a person named "Ima Hogg" and she lived in Houston. She wasn't all too interesting...

The activities of Miss Ima Hogg, known as the "First Lady of Texas" benefited another section of the Oscar F. Holcombe Civic Center. Miss Ima was born on July 10, 1882 in Mineola, Texas, the only daughter of Sarah Ann (Stinson) and Governor James Stephen Hogg. Her father named her after the heroine in a long epic poem written by her uncle, Thomas Elisha Hogg.
In 1891, Miss Ima and her brothers Will, Tom and Mike with their father moved into the Texas Governor's Mansion in Austin upon inauguration as the nineteenth governor of the state. They remained there until the end of his second term in 1895. Among other qualities, Governor Hogg instilled in his four children a deep concern for the citizens of Texas.
Between 1899 and 1901, Miss Ima attended the University of Texas at Austin, which had opened in 1883, and thereafter moved to New York City to study music. She was very close to her father and was with him when he died in Houston in March 1906. After his death, she continued to study piano both in the United States and in Germany and, in 1909, moved to Houston to teach. She was one of the organizers of the Houston Symphony Society when it was formed in 1913 and served as its second president from 1917 to 1921.

In 1918, the Hogg family developed their West Columbia oil field, south of Houston, and their wealth increased substantially. Like her brothers, Miss Ima used her share for the benefit of the public. Among her endowments was one for the founding of the Houston Child Guidance Center, an innovative institution in the field of child psychology. In addition, she helped carry out her brother Will's legacy after he died in 1930. One of his bequests resulted in the creation, in 1940, of the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health at his alma mater, the University of Texas at Austin. hou252.jpg

Miss Ima Hogg

source, if you care to read more about her

Nusentinsaino(Mostly wild college students)
by "wild" do you mean inebriated?



KoЯsakoff

Captain

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7th November 2003

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#9 12 years ago

WikipediaThe town of Soest

Soest is at least 975 years old. The oldest documents mentioning Soest (then written as Zoys) date from 1029. Its oldest church (the Oude Kerk, meaning Old Church), which is still in use today, dates from the 15th century.Traces of earlier habitation are found though. De area of "Hees", now at the outskirts of Soest may date in to the Early Middle Ages, and prehistoric burial mounds in the Soesterduinen point to early habitation in this area.

Medieval agricultural activity is still visible as there are many farmlands inside Soest. The biggest are in the center of the town, on a hill, and are called 'de Engh'. A nice small street is 'het Kerkepad'. The Soesterduinen, in the South, sanddunes, are worth visiting.

Source

The part of Hees actually is the place where I live, and the part about de Engh is where one of my favourite pubs is.




SteVen

"World's Best Boss"

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14th August 2004

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#10 12 years ago

You really, REALLY, REALLY dont want to know where i live :'(.