Target shooting/practise 19 replies

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Silberio VIP Member

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#1 6 years ago

Hi'ya'll. :cya:

A few weeks or months ago we had some nice discussions around here about firearms... Well, I don't know if it covered this topic, so I'd like to bring it up. Mainly because I want some advice aswell.

As you may know, I reside in the Kingdom of Sweden, whose greatness and tradition of every-man-shall-own-a-weapon-in-case-the-Danes-come-and-attack has kind of faded, I can only own softair guns (Plastic BB-bullets are used), and I proudly fire them in my appartment on an improvised target.

What I'd like to know is some advice on posture, aiming and precission in general. I've been googling around, but here is better help IMO since I can tell what I do and someone can hopefully correct me, aye?

So basically... What do you, shooters, do to improve aim with handguns and/or assault rifles, rifles and handheld weaponry in general?

What do you guys use mostly as target? Living targets (hunting and/or murder), cans, paper targets or other non-living moveable target?


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Lindale Forum Mod

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#2 6 years ago

[COLOR=SeaGreen]When it comes to pistols, I employ mainly law enforcement tactics. When I shoot, I hold the pistol like so:

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When it comes to rifles, I mainly use sniper tactics. I know it is overkill, but I mainly do this:

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m40-sniper.jpg

By the way, I myself own a Lee-Enfield passed down to me from my father.

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Also, the targets I use, I again took a lesson from law enforcement. I use particle board, and cut them into the shapes of humans in various stances. [/COLOR]


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Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#3 6 years ago

I haven't done target shooting in years, but I figure the classics are the best: hold the pistol with two hands, squeeze the trigger gently and exhale as you do. Also keep your eyes open, and make sure the iron sights are properly aligned.

When my dad bought me my first air pistol, I was shooting wrong every time we went shooting because the sights were off.




Silberio VIP Member

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#4 6 years ago

The Lee-Enfield is a beauty, least said. Great one there!

But yes, I've been trying to adop the law-enforcement "power stance" I think it was called, but my hands shake like hell and my pellets usually end up hell away from the target. I own a soft air Glock replica (about 400 gr, I'd say) and an AK 47 (about a Kilo and a half), both spring loaded.

And yeah, breathing techniques are good, right? I've read some article about snipers and how they hold their breath for about 10 seconds, and during those 10 seconds comes the trigger squeeze =p Pretty usefull, IMO, if done right. I've been trying on it.


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Lindale Forum Mod

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#5 6 years ago

[COLOR=SeaGreen]Actually, you do not hold your breath. A proper sniper uses gentle breathing to calm themselves. At the end of an exhale, then you fire. Also, it is best when done between heartbeats. :nodding: [/COLOR]


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Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#6 6 years ago

Einherjar Silberio;5645981The Lee-Enfield is a beauty, least said. Great one there!

But yes, I've been trying to adop the law-enforcement "power stance" I think it was called, but my hands shake like hell and my pellets usually end up hell away from the target. I own a soft air Glock replica (about 400 gr, I'd say) and an AK 47 (about a Kilo and a half), both spring loaded.

And yeah, breathing techniques are good, right? I've read some article about snipers and how they hold their breath for about 10 seconds, and during those 10 seconds comes the trigger squeeze =p Pretty usefull, IMO, if done right. I've been trying on it.

As MLM said, don't hold it, breathe gently, and fire on the exhale. If you hold your breath you'll end up shaking more than you do already. Or dead, if you forget that you're holding your breath.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

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#7 6 years ago

Silberio, I think another thing about shooting a pistol that I've had moderate success with is the "push-pull" system. With your dominant hand (or the hand that matches your dominant eye), push the pistol out towards the target. With your supporting hand, wrap around the dominant thumb and fingers and pull towards your body and a bit down. This should result in a more stable platform for shooting, I think. As a disclaimer, I have done very little shooting of firearms.




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#8 6 years ago

There are a few out door and indoor shooting ranges in my area. Never been to the indoor, but at the out door we bring our own paper targets and hang them on a plastic type fence they have there and shoot away.

It's pretty fun, everyone brings all different types of guns Pistols, Shotguns, Rifles, etc.

Other then that me and my husbands yard is really big, so we also have a BB gun we like to shoot. Just set up some cans or paper targets.

I always wanted to get one of those foam deers and just destroy it with a shotgun :]




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#9 6 years ago

I don't often get the opportunity, being in the UK and all. Basically only when my foreign friends are nice enough to let me play around with their ... junk.

Uh. :Puzzled:

Anyway, moving swiftly on. In my rather limited experience, there are very few uses for a standing stance. The best thing to do seems often to be to immediately move into some sort of cover, take a knee or go to the deck, and use that to steady your aim. Or, if no cover is available, to just dive for the deck. Maybe it's a bit lazy, and I suppose it would be considered cheating, but it seems to get you an awful lot of stability fairly quickly.

Other than that, I just steal a shortened karate stance. Less dominant side with the knee forwards, (so left for me,) hand with the dominant eye pushed out almost straight, less dominant arm slightly bent and pulling back a bit. That seems to work fairly well for the standing up stuff. It just feels very natural to go into, probably because I've got years of karate available. And if you do it more or less the same every time you know more or less where your first shot is going to go so you can do it very quickly without undue reference to the sights if you're not having to shoot dreadfully far.

Sounds very similar to the "push-pull" system Crazy Wolf mentioned. Which I guess just goes to show that people starting off with the same sort of problems come up with the same sort of answers.

Firing from the hip is an interesting trick. Very fast. I'm not sure it's appreciably faster to justify the trade-off in accuracy beyond point blank though. What's the saying? "Fast is fine but accuracy is everything." Something like that anyway. Which - eeee - I sort of see the argument for. Though I assume it's rather a tradeoff between weight of fire and accuracy in real life. Getting shot at a lot, if you can do it without a huge loss in accuracy, is probably more disconcerting than getting shot at a little. Though, that said, dying is probably the most disconcerting. =p

Like karate, I think the trick is to have a small selection of things that you can do and get very very good at them, and train them over and over in a variety of different contexts and scenarios, rather than to bother learning a gazillion different ways to shoot and train them in only one context.

If you're just interested in target shooting, people used that side on stance for years. So there may be something to that. You know, like archery - stick your legs shoulder width apart, stand with your dominant side closest to the target, punch that arm out in the relevant direction. I've not tried it myself though.

As for rifles, an area I've decidedly less experience with, I've only ever fired them from the deck and from supporting them against something. The trick seems to be to set your body up so the thing stays in more or less the same position without you needing to apply a lot of pressure with your hands. I've no idea how you'd teach someone to do that with a bunch of comments though - I just sort of feel it out. Obviously where your legs are pointing, especially the one on the same side as you've got the rifle snugged into your shoulder on, is going to be very important since that will affect the tension for your entire body.

#

Handheld weaponry in general is a really broad topic. =p I know a fair bit about archery - which is my projectile sport when I'm in the UK. Especially love the longbow - and incredibly intuitive weapon. You pretty much look at the target and take a stance and feel where the shot is going to land. It's something you get a feel of by doing the same thing over and over and over. Consistency is the key. You've got to have the discipline to analyse what you're doing so that you don't do something different that throws it completely off. No sights on a longbow.

Let's see, what else is there? Knives are always fun to fuck about with. Though most of what you end up practising there is just duelling. Someone comes at you with a knife in real life I doubt very much they're going to be gradually escalating the situation from the other side of the room and dancing around trying not to get cut. Worst case scenario, they're going to come in like a loony from extremely close range and you'll have take them down hard or the situation is going to spiral well out of control.

There seems to be almost as much subtlety in using a knife for duelling as there is in using your fists. Obvious primary difference is you just don't need the same grounding with a knife as you do with a fist. You don't need that structure. I think we all know, as kids, how annoying people who just really lightly jab you with their finger are - how difficult it is to stop. Makes for some very mobile exchanges.

Sticks are fun. Kali has some of the best concepts for training situational reflexes that I've ever seen. Those two person drills where one person does a very good attack and the other person does a very good defence and then they alternate and then they move into mixing it up and then it can naturally evolve into sparring.

Karate - back before it was karate in China - had something very similar in hand drills. And its approach to kata was very similar in that people were meant to start mixing it up and creating their own once they'd learned the form that exemplified the basic techniques of a particular system. People don't seem to do that much anymore and I think it's ripped the heart right out of the system. These days you see people start sparring and it's just bad boxing.

-shrug-

Really you could go on about this stuff for hours.




Silberio VIP Member

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#10 6 years ago

Aye, I knew something was wrong with the breathing technique... :vikki:

But yes, I've been trying a few techniques on with my Glock and the Push-pull seems to fit me best =p Though I get tired a little easier due to the... Pull. But indeed less shaky!

Another one I learned was to just use the non-dominant hand as a rest, without putting much effort. That has helped me really a lot aswell, though I don't know how it'd be if the gun had recoil, since I have pretty thing and weak arms...

@Lusty: I didn't think you were a shooting person! nice to hear! :-D

@Nem: Thanks for a very detailed reply!! Well, I've done some archery back in Chile, mostly improvised and the arrows (thin sticks) would barely penetrate a shoebox, but I learned some of the physics of the bow. It is absolutely my favorite weapon.

Since you brought up knives, I've always been a fan of knife combat, daggers, swords, etc. Though I hope I never get into a fight of that degree... ._.


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