Taxicabs in various countries 14 replies

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Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#1 10 years ago

Call me crazy but after playing some GTA IV I started to think about the differences in taxi's and dealings with taxi's in various countries.

I was playing GTA, entered the cab and noticed that the meter already started at $2 even if you would change your mind and exit the taxi again. I also noticed that you always would enter at the back, entering at the front only seems to be possible if you jack the car.

Anywaym like I said, this made me think about habbits people have etc. some stuff about Dutch taxi's:

- People most commonly take the front passenger seat (more leg space, more wide view around, more "personal" with the driver being some possible reasons) - Recent laws introduced a max starting fee (which includes the first two kilometres driven) , a max fee per additional km driven and a max waiting costs. Taxi's may then set their own start fee, km fee or waiting fee on what they think will work out best for them. The law ensures people can't be ripped off though and pay way way too much. - So there is no time based charged as in paying for every minute traveled or something. - The fairs must be clearly indicated on the front window or side window so that a person can read the pricechard from 5 meters away. - The most common taxi car brands are Mercedes, Opel (Vauxhall), Skoda and Ford (taxivans). - Drivers must have a pecial taxidriver lisence/permit - Cabs have a lightblue colored numbered played (instead of the general yellow numberplate) for easy identification and eliminating fraud (quickly converting a normal car into a taxi or vica versa, a taxi lisence illegally being used in a normal car etc.). - Most taxis seem to be darkblue/navyblue, silver or white in color?

taxi.jpgauto2.jpg

Source: Taxi (vervoer) - Wikipedia

I myself only used a taxi once (and a cheap one that was financed by the province I was in so I had to pay very little money for the trip :) ) I normally use either public transport, my bicycle or a car to get around.

So whagt about cabs in other countries? When I look at movies for example you get the impression that all American cabs are yellow or yellow-orange in color, force you to sit in the back seat and a boundary (glass, metal fencing etc.) seperates the drivers compartment and the passenger compartment. Which may be safer incase passengers have bad intentions but it also makes the whole cab driving experience a lot less personal.




Huffardo

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29th November 2003

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#2 10 years ago

Here taxi fares are decided on a national level, so wherever you use one the price is always the same for the same trip regardless of the taxi being used. The starting fee is 4,70€ on weekdays, 7,20€ on weekends and Sundays (including public holidays), the kilometer fee is 1,20€ for 1-2 passengers (up to 1,68 for 7-8), the waiting fee is 34,50€/h and the ordering fee is 5,60€. In the early '90s the prices used to be shown on a sticker inside the car, but I can't remember if that is the case anymore.

Taxi owners need a special license that is very regulated, but can have employees driving their car when they don't. The most common taxi car is without a doubt the Mercedes E-Class and the most common taxi van is the VW Transporter, other popular choices include e.g. Volvo V70 and Citroën C5. All are obviously diesels, usually with an automatic gearbox. Currently the most common colors appear to be silver, white and black, but this varies with time, IIRC red used to be quite popular not that long ago.

I don't really use taxis either, it is way too expensive. Used to travel to primary school with them every day though, it was horrible and took more than an hour each way, but necessary due to living in a small town with poor public transport some 40 km from school.

EDIT: A typical Finnish taxi: pikkutaksi20004uf0.jpg




Piet

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#3 10 years ago

Its funny how there are no commercials on them..




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

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#4 10 years ago

I think there aren't any taxi's with commercials on them (with perhaps the odd exception here or there?). I really never noticed any ads on taxis . Though busses (mostly interior advertising on A4 size or A3 size and sometimes on the exterior aswell) and trams (interior mostly, sometimes a banner on the exterior)do have them, and certain trains used to have ads on them aswell.




Darth Taxi

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#5 10 years ago

I don't know why but some force attracted me to this thread...

We have cabs same as anyother cars except they have that thing with taxi on the roof. And advertisments on them are phone number to the specific cab company or some pub it has a special offers if you want to be taken there.




Piet

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#6 10 years ago
Vasili

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#7 10 years ago

[COLOR=black]A hackney or hackney carriage (also called a cab or hack) is a [/COLOR][COLOR=black]carriage[/COLOR][COLOR=black] or [/COLOR][COLOR=black]automobile[/COLOR][COLOR=black] kept for hire. A livery carriage superior to the hackney was called a remise. In the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]United Kingdom[/COLOR][COLOR=black], the name hackney carriage refers to a [/COLOR][COLOR=black]taxicab[/COLOR][COLOR=black] licensed by the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Public Carriage Office[/COLOR][COLOR=black] in [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Greater London[/COLOR][COLOR=black] or by the local authority ([/COLOR][COLOR=black]non-metropolitan district[/COLOR][COLOR=black] councils or [/COLOR][COLOR=black]unitary authorities[/COLOR][COLOR=black]) in other parts of [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Great Britain[/COLOR][COLOR=black], or by the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Department of the Environment[/COLOR][COLOR=black] in Northern Ireland[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]The word is still the official term used by city authorities to refer to taxicabs in certain parts of the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]United States[/COLOR][COLOR=black], such as [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Boston[/COLOR][COLOR=black].[/COLOR]

Spoiler: Show
800px-Hackney_carriage.jpg

[COLOR=black]"An Ordinance for the Regulation of Hackney-Coachmen in London and the places adjacent" was approved by Parliament in 1654, to remedy what it described as the "many Inconveniences [that] do daily arise by reason of the late increase and great irregularity of Hackney Coaches and Hackney Coachmen in London, Westminster and the places thereabouts". [3] The first hackney-carriages licenses date from [/COLOR][COLOR=black]1662[/COLOR][COLOR=black], and applied literally to horse-drawn [/COLOR][COLOR=black]carriages[/COLOR][COLOR=black], later modernized as [/COLOR][COLOR=black]hansom cabs[/COLOR][COLOR=black] (1834), that operated as [/COLOR][COLOR=black]vehicles for hire[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. There was a distinction between a generic hackney carriage and a hackney [/COLOR][COLOR=black]coach[/COLOR][COLOR=black], a hireable vehicle with specifically four wheels, two horses and six seats, and driven by a jarvey (also spelled jarvie).[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Electric hackney carriages appeared before the introduction of the internal combustion engine to vehicles for hire in [/COLOR][COLOR=black]1901[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. During the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]20th century[/COLOR][COLOR=black], [/COLOR][COLOR=black]cars[/COLOR][COLOR=black] generally replaced horse-drawn models, and the last horse-drawn hackney carriage ceased service in London in [/COLOR][COLOR=black]1947[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. Horse-drawn hackney services in some other parts of the country continue to operate, for example in [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Cockington[/COLOR][COLOR=black], [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Torquay[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. A small, usually two-wheeled, one-horse hackney vehicle called a noddy once plied the roads in [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Ireland[/COLOR][COLOR=black] and [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Scotland[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. The French had a small hackney coach called a fiacre.[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Regulations define a hackney carriage as a taxicab allowed to ply the streets looking for passengers to pick up, as opposed to private hire vehicles (sometimes called minicabs), which may only pick up passengers who have previously booked or who visit the taxi operator's office.[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Several United States taxicab companies have purchased hackney carriages for use on US streets[/COLOR] hackney3.gif




Death_Korp_Of_KRIEG

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#8 10 years ago

Dubai taxis taxi.jpg

Taxis have a start fee of i think 4 UAE dirhams

i catch a cab atleats once a week, and i always take the back seat.

drivers often ask things which are a little personal, such as 'do you like boys or girls' and then ask about sexual relations.

i also know a large amount of girls what are not aloud to catch the cabs due to basically what i said.

some often try to rip you off by taking the long route. if this happens i give him about half of what the normal way would cost, and leave, if he says anything i tell them that he ripped me of and i have the right to call the police because he did something (took a different route) then what i told him




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

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#9 10 years ago

SpaZy;4336095Dubai taxis taxi.jpg

Taxis have a start fee of i think 4 UAE dirhams

i catch a cab atleats once a week, and i always take the back seat.

drivers often ask things which are a little personal, such as 'do you like boys or girls' and then ask about sexual relations.

i also know a large amount of girls what are not aloud to catch the cabs due to basically what i said.

some often try to rip you off by taking the long route. if this happens i give him about half of what the normal way would cost, and leave, if he says anything i tell them that he ripped me of and i have the right to call the police because he did something (took a different route) then what i told him

Heh, which such questions /i guess you would sit as far away from the driver as possible. =p Talking about yourself (or the taxi driver talking about himself) is okasy but things like your sexuality, what does that gain them except for knowing something very personal? I wouldn't ant to know why they would ask unless the topic kind of presented itself (during a chat about an article in the newspaper about something related to sexuality for example).

Though seriously, why the back seat? Simply out of personal habbit? Or because everybody seems to do it? Since it's kind of expected?




Jetfreak

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#10 10 years ago

Philippine Taxies

Spoiler: Show
transport-taxi.jpg

Drivers are good while others are complete Badasses. I myself have only rode several times with my dad, but my friends say that most drivers like to smoke a lot. Some taxies get you there on time but not always. Traffic is a major problem here. Apart from taxies, we also have rickshaws and jeepneys for public travel lol

Spoiler: Show
manila-style-jeepney-1_48.jpgoverloaded%20tricycle.jpg



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