This is how I want to live 18 replies

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Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#1 4 years ago

10014588_10152372266248706_211856225_n.jpg

All those in favor, say "aye."


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#2 4 years ago

[SIZE="1"]But... to a large extent those restraints are responsible for you having books and a window to sit by. The production of decent quality glass took thousands of years to get right, and requires highly complex infrastructure - books took even longer.[/SIZE] :lookaround:

I mean I want a post-scarcity society as much as anyone else, and I don't think wealth is distributed fairly, but it's folly to think that all the problems we have are artificial. Economics is freaking complex.

...

Wait, we were doing the warm fuzzies kind of post weren't we?

Yes, I too would like a life of art and pleasure - and if people could solve that death thing, that'd be awesome too =p




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#3 4 years ago

The closest you can get is to "live within your means", aka live as though you're poor, save up a shit ton of money, then bugger off for a while a few times, or retire earlier than you'd otherwise be able to. Or, though most employers get mad at this, work less than full time, like 4 days a week instead of 5. You can get close to your ideal if you're frugal.

Personally I'd like to read, game, cycle, chill on beaches, explore caves, backpack, and live at the shore of a lake. That'd be fantastic. Unfortunately we haven't invented replicators yet, and am instead doing homework and applying for jobs, though I did get a ride in this morning. XD




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#4 4 years ago

Mmm, spending little is definitely one of the better calls to make.

And there's no need to live like a pauper while you do. Buy a few high-quality things that you're going to enjoy for a long time. The ratio of happiness hours to £ should be high. Computer hardware? I've been using this computer for six or more hours most days and it's the better part of a decade old. It cost me around £1,000 including all the upgrades I've done to it over time.

I'd estimate it's got me around 15,000 hours worth of entertainment over those years.

That's £0.06p per happiness hour. Two entire orders of magnitude more efficient than going to see a movie or what have you.

You can also use this in reverse as a fuzzy guard against things with a high immediate pleasure but poor long-term returns. If you wouldn't spend money on something, why is it worth an hour of your time? See people mass consuming TV nonsense.

Just think about how something will change your happiness prospects before purchasing and you'll be ahead of most of the people out there.




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#5 4 years ago

$/hour of happiness is a good way of looking at it.

Some also look at buying things as not purchasing them with money, but with their time.




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#6 4 years ago

It is pretty much just a motivational poster.

But I thought the idea was nice enough to share. Even if it's one most of us have dreamt at one point or another.

And it's not as if there aren't ways to achieve something close to that, which you've already mentioned. Personally, however, I would also like a job that I can really participate in and have some measure of control over what's said in done, even it's if only marginal. Which is why I was considering the public sector =p

Still...there's an interesting argument made in a novel that has perhaps a better explanation of the idea.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



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#7 4 years ago

Which novel?




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#8 4 years ago

Jurassic Park =p

EDIT:

Here's the actual passage that I recall:

Spoiler: Show
Ellie said, "You don't think much of Arnold, do you?" "He's all right. He's an engineer. Wu's the same. They're both technicians. They don't have intelligence. They have what I call 'thintelligence.' They see the immediate situation. They think narrowly and they call it 'being focused.' They don't see the surround. They don't see the consequences. That's how you get an island like this. From thintelligent thinking. Because you cannot make an animal and not expect it to act alive. To be unpredictable. To escape. But they don't see that." "Don't you think it's just human nature?" Ellie said. "God, no," Malcolm said. "That's like saying scrambled eggs and bacon for breakfast is human nature. It's nothing of the sort. It's uniquely Western training, and much of the rest of the world is nauseated by the thought of it." He winced in pain. "The morphine's making me philosophical." "You want some water?" "No. I'll tell you the problem with engineers and scientists. Scientists have an elaborate line of bullshit about how they are seeking to know the truth about nature. Which is true, but that's not what drives them. Nobody is driven by abstractions like 'seeking truth.' "Scientists are actually preoccupied with accomplishment. So they are focused on whether they can do something. They never stop to ask if they should do something. They conveniently define such considerations as pointless. If they don't do it, someone else will. Discovery, they believe, is inevitable. So they just try to do it first. That's the game in science. Even pure scientific discovery is an aggressive, penetrative act. It takes big equipment, and it literally changes the world afterward. Particle accelerators sear the land, and leave radioactive byproducts. Astronauts leave trash on the moon. There is always some proof that scientists were there, making their discoveries. Discovery is always a rape of the natural world. Always. "The scientists want it that way. They have to stick their instruments in. They have to leave their mark. They can't just watch. They can't just appreciate. They can't just fit into the natural order. They have to make something unnatural happen. That is the scientist's job, and now we have whole societies that try to be scientific." He sighed, and sank back. Ellie said, "Don't you think you're overstating-" "What does one of your excavations look like a year later?" "Pretty bad," she admitted. "You don't replant, you don't restore the land after you dig?" "No." "Why not?" She shrugged. "There's no money, I guess. . . . "There's only enough money to dig, but not to repair?" "Well, we're just working in the badlands. . . ." "Just the badlands," Malcolm said, shaking his head. "Just trash. Just byproducts. Just side effects . . . I'm trying to tell you that scientists want it this way. They want byproducts and trash and scars and side effects. It's a way of reassuring themselves. It's built into the fabric of science, and it's increasingly a disaster." "Then what's the answer?" "Get rid of the thintelligent ones. Take them out of power." "But then we'd lose all the advances-" "What advances?" Malcolm said irritably. "The number of hours women devote to housework has not changed since 1930, despite all the advances. All the vacuum cleaners, washer-dryers, trash compactors, garbage disposals, wash-and-wear fabrics . . . Why does it still take as long to clean the house as it did in 1930?" Ellie said nothing. "Because there haven't been any advances," Malcolm said. "Not really. Thirty thousand years ago, when men were doing cave paintings at Lascaux, they worked twenty hours a week to provide themselves with food and shelter and clothing. The rest of the time, they could play, or sleep, or do whatever they wanted. And they lived in a natural world, with clean air, clean water, beautiful trees and sunsets. Think about it. Twenty hours a week. Thirty thousand years ago." Ellie said, "You want to turn back the clock?" "No," Malcolm said. "I want people to wake up. We've had four hundred years of modern science, and we ought to know by now what it's good for, and what it's not good for. It's time for a change." "Before we destroy the planet?" she said. He sighed, and closed his eyes. "Oh dear," he said. "That's the last thing I would worry about."

You may read it at your leisure. If you want.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



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#9 4 years ago

I knew it was going to be a Malcolm quote. =p




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#10 4 years ago

Well, yeah =p


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



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