Tipping....wtf? 58 replies

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NiteStryker

Biggest F-ing A-hole 2010

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24th April 2003

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#21 10 years ago

Minnesnowtan;4927648 Really though tipping is an ingenious concept, because it (in theory) rewards the employees who do the best work and treat the customers best, and leaves the ones just there to pick up a check with just that, a small check for their labor. Survival of the friendliest, really.[/QUOTE] I could understand tipping someone who did a shit hot job, I'd agree with that, but I dont agree with the standardization of tipping as an expectation. "You did good so I pay you extra 5...you sucked ass so you only get an extra 3".

n0e;4927682FYI, most restaurants are allowed to underpay (pay below minimum wage) because they are expected to be compensated with gratuity.

But why has it been allowed to evolve into that? Why are they expecting my extra money? They are doing their job by bringing me food. A pizza delivery man knows his job is to bring my pizza to me, so I dont get why he complains bout having to pay for his own gas.

[QUOTE=n0e] As for starbucks and other places like that.. I only really see a need to tip them if they're overwhelmed with customers that the poor person doing that simple task is trying to hear 8 orders at once and get them all correct to the right people in a timely fashion. That guy/gal deserves a little extra for the ability to do that.

For outstanding shit, I would agree, but bullshit is like when restruants auto-include a gratuity.




Guest

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#22 10 years ago
NiteStryker;4928253I could understand tipping someone who did a shit hot job, I'd agree with that, but I dont agree with the standardization of tipping as an expectation. "You did good so I pay you extra 5...you sucked ass so you only get an extra 3".

Um it isn't common to tip someone who does a crap job. If anything I simply give them the rounded up change to piss them off. If someone does a good job I tip, and if they do a great job I tip well.




Admiral Donutz Advanced Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#23 10 years ago

NiteStryker;4927615My wife and I were having a discussion about this and Im bringing it to you all.

Im asking why the hell I should tip people. Waiters, pizza deliveryman, barber, etc. They are being paid to do that job, why am I expected to give them extra money? (Espically those starbucks bitches....I'd understand tipping someone who did something, but not someone who just wrote my name on a cup, then poured liquid in it, thats not rocket science and its not a mixed drink so it doesnt take skill).

My wife says its because their job wage is low because they will get tips to compensate. Now why the hell is the job relying on other peoples generosity then as payment?[/QUOTE] Overhere tips are just that, a tip. It's a small reward for good or excellent service and usually ranges from 5-10% or "keep the change" for very small orders (like a coffee, coffee and some cake etc.). The more pleased you are the more tip you give, if you are not pleased at all you give no time or leave like 10 cents. If the service was "allright" then I think it's okay to just let them have the change (which might be a €1-2).

Waiters are commonly tipped for good service, probably food (pizza) deiivery guys but not many other sectors. It seems strange to me to tip people you have 5 seconds of interaction with like a person behind the counter in a fastfood place and the like. Same with taxi drivers, those are expensive enough as is.

Employees get atleast minimal wage regardless of sector, that's why it's called minimum wage, no matter were you work or what you do, you atleast earn the minimum wage (€5-7?).

It's true that people can earn quite a bit in tips, working a whle evening as a waiter generally gets you €70-100 at least (unless it was a real shitty evening with few guest, real pricks, a lot going wrong for whatever reasons etc.).

Hell, beggars tend to make atleast 100 (to 200+) euros for begging all day long! So I see no need to donate to beggars, they generally make enough money for food and such already and we do have homeless shelters and a reasonbly working wellfare system so if you really don't want to you don't have to live on the streets.

Killer Kyle;4927868When I broke down in Amarillo, my dutch friend actually tipped the tow truck driver, which is something I never think of doing (or most anyone else in the US). He said that tipping people makes them happier and thus a better worker, and they will also provide better service to you in the future.

In other words, it makes their day.

I assume that the dutch tip more people than we do, but that may also be something that he and his family just does.

I'd disagree, tips are usually left to waiters and the like. But if the towtruck driver was really friendly and showed some extrordinairy service (like making a detour to drop you off or something) then yes a tip would be in place.

[QUOTE=Count_Chocu1a;4927806]Actually, leaving a below average tip is more insulting than no tip at all. So, if you want to teach a crappy server a lesson, just leave them some change.

Depends on how low the tip is and how high the bill (generaly the higher the bill the more items were ordered by more people, and the more time you spent there thus meaning you required more service). Leaving an avarage tip (5-10%) for good service, a lower tip for "reasonable" service (leavng the change more or less) and no tip or like 10 cents for bad service and an excellent tip (20%) for excellent service sounds quite reasonable to me (used to be a waiter for a year and a bartender for several years after that but in that position I had to rely in the waiters to share their tips with me as we had only served at the tables).

In short: I don't quite understand how tips became so expected it badically is required of you to tip. And that in addition it's not just a tip (extra, a reward) but you tipping for standard (allright/reasonable) service, that should simply be in the wage. The wage should cover the amount of effort etc. you do for simply doing your job, nothing less, nothing more. And the tips, as the same implies, being a reward in addition to that for offering more then just doing your job.

But it was quite good to have American guests, because they would always give high (15-20%) tips, even if you just gave them basic service. =p It always seemed a bit strange, a thought of "are they insane? Well I won't complain, haha".

Edit: Other areas I'd assume people would tip would be dancers and such, housekeeping (so they are more inclined to clean properly and not just brush the surfaces quickly or not at all and change the sheets and leave it at that), tour guides if they did more then just telling their standard story from A to Z etc. The subscription newspaper boy/girl who goes door to door around Christmas (gets 5-10 euro's), those advertise/free newspaper also do this and often get 50 cents to a euro (and because they go to every door make more then the dedicated newspaper delivery person!), I'd not give those advert delivery kids a cent for that reason. But those who deliver mail you are subscribed to on a daily basis through shitty wetter and all? Most certainly.

Having the tip included in the bill (service charge) sounds silly, no, wrong to me. Why would I pay for service if it's absolute shit or if they really only gave the minimum amount of service expected from them?! :uhm:

Edit2: The obvious flaw in tipping is that the tip maynot receive all of the people who helped in bringing you your good service and thus contributed to your "satisfaction level": not only the waiter is part of the chain but so is the bartender, cook, dishwashing staff etc. I know a lot of waiters I worked with rarely shared their tip with the kitchen staff, and only with the bartender (me) if they made atleast X euro's and weren't real pricks. Some cunts walked away with 200 euro's or more and never shared a single euro with me or the kitchen even if we spent a hell spent a ot fo effort in getting the order ready ASAP or if it demandend special attention of some sort. So it's fair to ask "Do you split/pool the tip here (collect all tip in a jar, split it up amongst all staff)?" and then consider not or partially tipping the waiter and handing remaining tip to remaining staff that you can spot (bartender, more tricky would eb the kitchen staff). So that you know it's not some cunt that gets to keep all of your tip.




Lukeaxx

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12th January 2009

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#24 10 years ago

It is almost like giving thanks to them... because we all know how terrible Waiters/Waitresses can be sometimes...

Its always nice to have a Waiter/Waitress who does their job properly. I like to thank the good staff for a job done well.




the1chaos Advanced Member

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16th January 2004

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#25 10 years ago

I find that I'm usually a pretty generous tipper myself, though only at actual restaurants or cabs. At restaurants, I usually tip around 15-30% for good service, but truly excellent service can go way over that. The last time I went out to dinner for example, I received truly fantastic service. I never had to call the waitress for a refill on a drink, the dinner arrived within a minute of us finishing the appetizers. She was standing at the table to hand us the desert menus and pick up the plates within a minute of us finishing it, as well. Extremely friendly, went to check for us if all the things were in stock (they weren't the day before) and even made some friendly smalltalk. The deserts also arrived in a very timely manner. Best service I ever received, so I gave the best tip I ever gave too - a 110% tip to be split between her and the kitchen staff working on our orders.

I have no problem rewarding excellence.




Goody. Advanced Member

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26th July 2005

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#26 10 years ago

In the UK we have something called a Service charge, This is a % of your bill for the Serving staff. In other words it is a tip as is it a voluntary charge. 99% of places will not tell you it is a voluntary charge and some do not even have it on there menus. It is just added to your final bill. So if you pay the service charge and leave a %based tip then you just got screwed. I once left a resteraunt after waiting for 1 hour for a wrong meal and did not leave the extra service charge that was listed on the bill. The manager came running out demanding "his" money. He soon walked away when he realised that I knew it was a voluntary charge and started explaining it at the top of my voice infront of his business.

Fast food delivery guys always get a tip especially if there quick. I used to deliver pizzas ages ago and I know how hectic it can get when things are really busy.




Lyon

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9th July 2003

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#27 10 years ago

NiteStryker;4927615My wife and I were having a discussion about this and Im bringing it to you all.

Im asking why the hell I should tip people. Waiters, pizza deliveryman, barber, etc. They are being paid to do that job, why am I expected to give them extra money? (Espically those starbucks bitches....I'd understand tipping someone who did something, but not someone who just wrote my name on a cup, then poured liquid in it, thats not rocket science and its not a mixed drink so it doesnt take skill).

My wife says its because their job wage is low because they will get tips to compensate. Now why the hell is the job relying on other peoples generosity then as payment?

Basically it encourages waiters to do a better job as the reward is often a bigger tip, rather than paying them a set wage which is slightly higher.

It basically improves customer service.

Places that combine everyone's tips and split them evenly between the staff defeat the entire purpose of it. That I never understood.




roostermeat

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14th June 2009

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#28 10 years ago

There is something called service charge in my country. Basically it's a mandatory 10% tipping. Being an Asian country, if you don't have this rule NOBODY would ever, ever tip anyone. The only time I tip is when I'm expecting change of less than a dollar, then I ask them to keep the change, and that's really better than most people.




Kilobyte

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#29 10 years ago
Lyon;4928706Places that combine everyone's tips and split them evenly between the staff defeat the entire purpose of it. That I never understood.

No it doesn't. Because the waitresses will get tired of giving half of their tips to the slackers. They will get that waitress/waiter fired.

It does even out the top waitresses/waiters, and keeps away the appearance of favoritism.

--------------------

20% tip!!!

I thought 10% was standard. 15% being a good tip. Everywhere I go, each town seems to have its own standards on tipping, which completely throw off the tip I am trying to give.

Unfortunately, I am still trying to figure out what tip is expected locally. I've heard that they go by stars, and a $1 for each star, for average service.

I've never really received more than average service. I've always had to wait/call for a refill, outside of a Ryans, or Golden Corral.

The last time I can understand, as I ordered two glasses, a coke and a water. I drank those pretty quickly, and I ended up drinking 7 glasses in total. I had to hold my glasses up for another waiter to refill it.




-=[Ranek]=-

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#30 10 years ago
Lyon;4928706 Places that combine everyone's tips and split them evenly between the staff defeat the entire purpose of it. That I never understood.

How so? you tip the waiter for the service, but a lot of people tip if the food is exceptionally good, why should the waiter be tipped for that?

Places that split tips, do so for the benefit of the kitchen staff, who, don't get tipped as they're not seen.