Uncle Sam wants you! To answer these questions. 131 replies

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Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#21 8 years ago

computernerd;5294642Well basic training is designed to be that way, it's supposed to break you down and build you back up, so that you learn to take orders without question.

However, that's pretty shitty of the superior to chew him out for one extra flannel, I'd think you would only get chewed out for the opposite.

In terms of psychological effect to me basic training looks like it is done the way it is to break down a specific type of undesirable person and build him back up to an acceptable level of competence. Historically speaking that certainly seems to be where the majority of the ideas come from; when you conscripted a bunch of people, a lot of whom were from the lower classes, and then had to get them working together relatively quickly. Also where a lot of the grade distinctions in schools come from BTW; originally there was little distinction between adult university and children's lessons, it worked incredibly well - but I digress.

The idea that a bit of physical hardship and abuse is going to break someone down who's got a stable head on their shoulders just doesn't ring true for me. However that it persists makes it rather ill-suited to people with a reasonable education who already have a certain level of self discipline and would like to build upon their level of competence. It won't break them, but it stands a good chance of getting them to decide it's not something they're interested in doing.




Destroyer25

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#22 8 years ago

Nemmerle;5294656In terms of psychological effect to me basic training looks like it is done the way it is to break down a specific type of undesirable person and build him back up to an acceptable level of competence. Historically speaking that certainly seems to be where the majority of the ideas come from; when you conscripted a bunch of people, a lot of whom were from the lower classes, and then had to get them working together relatively quickly. Also where a lot of the grade distinctions in schools come from BTW; originally there was little distinction between adult university and children's lessons, it worked incredibly well - but I digress.

The idea that a bit of physical hardship and abuse is going to break someone down who's got a stable head on their shoulders just doesn't ring true for me. However that it persists makes it rather ill-suited to people with a reasonable education who already have a certain level of self discipline and would like to build upon their level of competence. It won't break them, but it stands a good chance of getting them to decide it's not something they're interested in doing.

Intelligent people go to officer school mate. :D If I joined the army I wouldn't enlist as a private. I'd go to the RMC and train as an officer. Canada will need me when the realize that all the generals forget how to fight a conventional war. :lulz:




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#23 8 years ago

I also wouldn't mind being an Air Force Pararescue. I hate it when I tell people I want to be in the USAF and they respond with: "You want to kill people for a living?!" And be able to say "No, I want to save peoples lives." But, I doubt I would ever be able to be AFSOCOM.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

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#24 8 years ago
Stratopwn3r;5294684I also wouldn't mind being an Air Force Pararescue. I hate it when I tell people I want to be in the USAF and they respond with: "You want to kill people for a living?!" And be able to say "No, I want to save peoples lives." But, I doubt I would ever be able to be AFSOCOM.

Start exercising, now. My ASI(Aerospace Science Instructor, the retired enlisted man attached to our JROTC unit) received his draft card in the mail for Vietnam, went to the recruiter's office, signed up for the Air Force, and heard about Pararescue during Basic Training. He made a career out of it. If I recall correctly, out of his class of 200, 2 made it through (on schedule, they might have allowed those who, say, broke a leg, to come back when their leg was healed). These might seem like low odds, and they kinda are, but they're a hell of a lot better than 0%. Go for it, and don't quit. Chief(the ASI, he reached CMSgt. rank) was pretty fit (and still is, albeit now with a belly that looks very out of place with toned arms and legs), he played football in high school, but the most enduring part of his character I recall is his stubbornness. If you can will yourself to run those few extra feet, to hold your breath those few seconds longer, to spend just a bit more time camouflaging yourself, you'll have a better chance of making it through. If I'm recalling correctly, Roaming East wasn't Pararescue, but he had a similar unusual job in the USAF. See if he pokes his head in here, maybe he'd have some information or his perspective for you.




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#25 8 years ago

Yeah, If there was anything I could do, it would be PJ or 1st-SFOD-D. I have SOOOOO much respect for them and the job sounds difficult and important. Something I would like to do!




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#26 8 years ago

Nemmerle;5294656In terms of psychological effect to me basic training looks like it is done the way it is to break down a specific type of undesirable person and build him back up to an acceptable level of competence. Historically speaking that certainly seems to be where the majority of the ideas come from; when you conscripted a bunch of people, a lot of whom were from the lower classes, and then had to get them working together relatively quickly. Also where a lot of the grade distinctions in schools come from BTW; originally there was little distinction between adult university and children's lessons, it worked incredibly well - but I digress.

The idea that a bit of physical hardship and abuse is going to break someone down who's got a stable head on their shoulders just doesn't ring true for me. However that it persists makes it rather ill-suited to people with a reasonable education who already have a certain level of self discipline and would like to build upon their level of competence. It won't break them, but it stands a good chance of getting them to decide it's not something they're interested in doing.

It varies by branch here in the US.

(The following list is from what I've researched about each, I'm obviously not an expert, so just take this all with a grain of salt)

Air Force: 8 weeks of boot camp, plenty of PT, not as much yelling as Marine Corps, but it's still there.

Army: was 8 weeks, but they changed it to 9 a couple years ago, from what I've seen and read, they've toned down the stress a bit (yelling, hazing, etc.).

Coast Guard: Their boot camp is actually pretty tough, they hazing and mind games they do are similar to Marine Corps, and there's lots of yelling.

Navy: Not too sure about Navy, I've never been able to research much about other than a couple instructional videos and they never really showed the in depth stuff, and I haven't been able to really question someone who has been through Navy boot camp.

Marine Corps: Worst of the bunch, 13 weeks of yelling, hazing, drilling, and constant stress.

Now the main point here is: each of the branches have different jobs, and they all play their part. The reason why branches like Marine Corps make their training so tough, is because they want to give new recruits the best preparation they can get, because the main focus of the Marine Corps is combat/infantry. There is lots of yelling, mind games, and mental stress because they're training you to think while under stress, which is very important if you seriously want to fight for your country.

Of course, that kind of training applies to every day life too. That's one of the reasons why I like Young Marines and other military programs; it's good training for life.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Destroyer25

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#27 8 years ago

computernerd;5294703It varies by branch here in the US.

(The following list is from what I've researched about each, I'm obviously not an expert, so just take this all with a grain of salt)

Air Force: 8 weeks of boot camp, plenty of PT, not as much yelling as Marine Corps, but it's still there.

Army: was 8 weeks, but they changed it to 9 a couple years ago, from what I've seen and read, they've toned down the stress a bit (yelling, hazing, etc.).

Coast Guard: Their boot camp is actually pretty tough, they hazing and mind games they do are similar to Marine Corps, and there's lots of yelling.

Navy: Not too sure about Navy, I've never been able to research much about other than a couple instructional videos and they never really showed the in depth stuff, and I haven't been able to really question someone who has been through Navy boot camp.

Marine Corps: Worst of the bunch, 13 weeks of yelling, hazing, drilling, and constant stress.

Now the main point here is: each of the branches have different jobs, and they all play their part. The reason why branches like Marine Corps make their training so tough, is because they want to give new recruits the best preparation they can get, because the main focus of the Marine Corps is combat/infantry. There is lots of yelling, mind games, and mental stress because they're training you to think while under stress, which is very important if you seriously want to fight for your country.

Of course, that kind of training applies to every day life too. That's one of the reasons why I like Young Marines and other military programs; it's good training for life.

Marines need to be tough, they get crappy equipment.




NiteStryker

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#28 8 years ago
computernerd;5294610Are you talking about basic training or the actual work that you do once you become a Soldier?

All infantry get treated like shit.

I think military service should be a requirement, even at the bare minimum, 2 years as a reservist. I do believe society would be a little better if everyone at least went thru Boot Camp. Teaches you alot of stuff.

I learned time management / effenciency, developed way better organizational skills, and improved discipline.




Destroyer25

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#29 8 years ago

NiteStryker;5295309All infantry get treated like shit.

I think military service should be a requirement, even at the bare minimum, 2 years as a reservist. I do believe society would be a little better if everyone at least went thru Boot Camp. Teaches you alot of stuff.

I learned time management / effenciency, developed way better organizational skills, and improved discipline.

It would give people more respect for the army, in theory its a good idea but its just horribly unpractical. You can't have everyone be a reservist for 2 years, people are needed for other stuff too.




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#30 8 years ago
Destroyer25;5295322It would give people more respect for the army, in theory its a good idea but its just horribly unpractical. You can't have everyone be a reservist for 2 years, people are needed for other stuff too.

Alot of countries do it. In Israel, everyone is technically a reservist after they serve their 3 years.