What is a Swede for you? 30 replies

Please wait...

Silberio VIP Member

Bourée

392,819 XP

9th October 2007

0 Uploads

37,218 Posts

4 Threads

#1 6 years ago

Howdy fellas.

I'm currently working on a school project where I have to describe the 'typical' Swedish person to a foreigner and I'm just here to get opinions on what other people, like ya'll here, think of the regular Swede. If you think we're all reckless vikings who walk around with axes (Which we totally do), it's alright... I just want opinions =p

Now, if anyone has experience on this... Describing stuff, I'd appriciate it. I don't wanna fall into making stereotypes, which is fairly easy in this situation.

PS: Posted this here since it's, to me, a bit more serious to be posted at spam.


qjyUJrq.png



Biiviz

Eggs!

50 XP

29th February 2004

0 Uploads

3,168 Posts

0 Threads

#2 6 years ago

Trust me, I'm Finnish.

The World in Flames - YouTube




Granyaski VIP Member

High as a kite

107 XP

29th May 2008

0 Uploads

11,881 Posts

1 Threads

#3 6 years ago

To me a Swede is a type of turnip :p

To be quite honest I don't really know what to expect of a Swedish person, being British we are pretty ignorant when it comes to foreigners and only recently has the government put on emphasis on teaching us about other cultures.

All I have to go on is Vikings and blonde people living in a sparse mountain town speaking with funny accents "OH JAA" whilst eating weird food and having very strange traditions- Yeah who the fuck said television didn't fuck people up?




Biiviz

Eggs!

50 XP

29th February 2004

0 Uploads

3,168 Posts

0 Threads

#4 6 years ago




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

298,365 XP

26th May 2003

0 Uploads

28,147 Posts

5 Threads

#5 6 years ago

I don't really know anything about the Swedish. It's not a culture that exports a great deal of media into my sphere. I believe the country used to be a quite powerful empire back in the 18th Century and its law makers are quite comfy with the US.... Oh and they made Let the Right One In, which was a fantastic vampire film (though a little messed up). Listing little bits of trivia I guess we could go on for a while.

But as to its people, how they behave.... I mean do you cue in supermarkets? We do, all the time. And if someone skips the cue - which they very rarely do - sometime's we're too polite to make much of a fuss over it.

Do you say thank you or cheers to the bar tender when you pay? That sort of thing.

If you wave to someone how many fingers do you hold up? I noticed that one can vary fairly widely even within countries.

What sort of personal space do you exercise?

Do you look people in the eyes when you're talking to them?

What sort of eye contact do you make when you're just walking around?

What's the 'average' family power-structure like?

How friendly are you to strangers.... No that's a bad way of putting that one. How easy is it for strangers to learn your customs?

Do you wear school uniforms? There's another one that's fairly revealing.

That sort of stuff, and the underlying ways of thinking that drive it, I've very little idea about.




Guest

I didn't make it!

0 XP

 
#6 6 years ago

First thing that came to my mind when I saw this thread:

Crappy video is a crappy video, so you might wanna turn your volume up a bit.

So, are all (male) Swedes like this guy? =p




Octovon

Spaceman

54,945 XP

5th August 2003

0 Uploads

5,317 Posts

0 Threads

#7 6 years ago

Swedish people drive Volvos or Saabs, eat lots of herring, and invented Ikea. That is all I can think of off the top of my head.




Guest

I didn't make it!

0 XP

 
#8 6 years ago

From what I have seen, the Swedes hold a vested interest in their independent film industry. My host´s mind studied several of their productions many years ago. I don´t know any of them personally, but from what I have observed, they seem to be very enterprising and determined to utilize their talents.




Fortune

something to believe.

50 XP

19th February 2005

0 Uploads

7,750 Posts

0 Threads

#9 6 years ago

I'm a quarter Swedish, but also half black; I like to consider myself an ebony blonde.

I'm sure Sweden is full of people with long, sometimes braided blonde hair, who are quite intelligent, crafty and speak the Skyrim dragon language. All the girls are hot, but the vast majority of the males are the gayest straight people alive; nevertheless you'll never look down on them for it because for whatever reason it kind of works for them.

Nobody owns a coat. Everyone has modular furniture, uses unisex bathrooms, eats food that looks like Mexican food?

Those are my casual assumptions about my old-world homeland.




Biiviz

Eggs!

50 XP

29th February 2004

0 Uploads

3,168 Posts

0 Threads

#10 6 years ago

Nemmerle;56576451. But as to its people, how they behave.... I mean do you cue in supermarkets? We do, all the time. And if someone skips the cue - which they very rarely do - sometime's we're too polite to make much of a fuss over it.

2. Do you say thank you or cheers to the bar tender when you pay? That sort of thing.

3. If you wave to someone how many fingers do you hold up? I noticed that one can vary fairly widely even within countries.

4. What sort of personal space do you exercise?

5. Do you look people in the eyes when you're talking to them?

6. What sort of eye contact do you make when you're just walking around?

7. What's the 'average' family power-structure like?

8. How friendly are you to strangers.... No that's a bad way of putting that one. How easy is it for strangers to learn your customs?

9. Do you wear school uniforms? There's another one that's fairly revealing.

That sort of stuff, and the underlying ways of thinking that drive it, I've very little idea about.

I can easily answer these questions for you, seeing as the Nordic countries are all the same, apart from the names. Plus, I've been in Sweden at least once a year my entire life.

1. Yes, they cue in the supermarket. At the register, at the recycling machine, at free sample stands, etc. I'd go as far as saying Nordic people love standing in line, especially old people. If you only have a few items to buy, people often let you go before them.

2. Some do, some don't. City people in Sweden generally don't. I do, but I was raised to be polite.

3. Waving is done with your whole hand, palm ds. Other common greeting gestures at distances include; nodding downwards, or nodding upwards.

4. Strangers don't touch, unless greeting with a handshake. It's common to just avoid taking the elevator if someone else happens to occupy it already, even if there's room (does not apply to when people are in a hurry).

5. If you have any social skills, yes.

6. Generally you should avoid eye-contact in cities, but still it differs a lot from person to person.

7. Women are regarded as equals in the family, but who is "in charge" in a family entirely depends on the personalities of the individuals themselves.

8. Swedes, as the rest of us, love to share their culture and customs simply because the small countries up here in the north have always been ignored. Regardless of people being critical of Americans' view on politics etc. on the Internet, you'll be center of attention immediately if you mention being one. The same goes for most other foreigners as well. Cultural differences is regarded as interesting.

9. No, no-one wears school uniforms.