Which is the best Martial for a real life situation? 65 replies

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random_soldier1337

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#1 10 years ago

Just wondering. One of my friends suggested Krav Maga. I think so too but there is the one matter that they use groin strikes. Oh well, gotta do what has to be done. Your choices, opinions, etc.?




Badha1rday

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#2 10 years ago
MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#3 10 years ago

I think it mostly depends on how well you train and how good your trainer is.

For example, you will often see when watching martial arts videos that people seem to play along with the techniques which is often justified by "the enemy wouldn't see it coming anyway", but like this you probably won't be able to use the technque effectively because you never really practised it. This is why I think that martial arts like Judo, Ji Jitsu or Kickboxing are more effective - you usually practise the real techniques and don't just simulate them.




Sh0wdowN

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#4 10 years ago
BadHairDay;45645006 Great Martial Arts for Killing a Man With Your Bare Hands | Cracked.com I think this fits the description.

I agree with this link.

However, first it's important to know that it's the practitioner that matters, ultimately. What makes the sports great martial arts for self-defense is basically the general mentality amongst those who practice it, because they are serious. I used to do MMA, but I've gone over to Kali (or Escrima, as it's put on that list. There're various "styles", but the general concept is universally the same, so there're only some slight nuances, like one emphasizes knife techniques above others, or stick techniques, or disarm -- mostly that), and currently practice that.

I reckon Krav Maga is the better one to do, as it's proper rbsd (reality based self defense) that emphasizes scenario drills and to get you used to the stress of being in an actual life-threatening situation. I'd do Krav Maga and Kali if it was near me, but since only one is near, I'll stick with that only. Look these up if you're serious about self-defense, and don't think that by going to these 2 times a week will make it safe. You're never safe, and you can't only think about it when at practice. You have to always think about it. Eat, breathe and dream of kali, krav maga or whatever you're doing. Only that way can it become instinctive.

An attacker won't hesitate for that split-second you try to remember last wednesday's drill. So don't remember. And don't think. Just drill it until you do it. That's the key, and something you shouldn't ever forget if you're serious about it.




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#5 10 years ago

personally i do karate and im a 3kyu currently and i find that against a typical opponent that has no training like your normal drunk in a pub or mugger on the street in equipped to handle myself but id love to learn that krav maga looks really intresting




Captain Fist

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#6 10 years ago

It's the martial artist, not the martial art.

This, I feel, is partly true, obviously if you're an excellent and reality faced Wushu artist then it's not going to be that effective. Wushu is full of flips, acrobatics, and other unnecessary stunts and BS.

A serious Karate or one of the more southern based Shaolin artists can be just as serious and able as any MMA practitioner. Problem is, most of them aren't because they are practicing severely watered down versions and probably aren't training like an MMA professional. You see practitioners of traditional martial arts get schooled for this reason. The artist themselves often has no knowledge of what's happening and refuses to adapt to what's going on. A martial art needs to be flexible to be effective.

I also find that a lot of the McDojos that teach traditional martial arts don't employ sparring, which is easily the most effective training that can be offered at any kind of Dojo or studio. It offers (Most of the time, provided you're not doing Taekwondo) realistic training of what you might be facing on the street.

Not to mention half the time the MMA guys just tackle them and get them in an armbar or something.

For the record, I do Karate and it's kind of like Karate mixed with boxing. Though I find that if I was ever in a life or death situation, I would fight as dirty as possible (Groin kicks, throat puches and eye gouges) and then just run. It's not worth losing my life. And if you're getting jumped by multiple people . . I don't know. Run.

Just do boxing. Its very easy to pick and very adaptable. I bet you could mix it with Hung Gar.




Junk angel

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#7 10 years ago
personally i do karate and im a 3kyu currently and i find that against a typical opponent that has no training like your normal drunk in a pub or mugger on the street in equipped to handle myself but id love to learn that krav maga looks really intresting __________________

The reason why you can do that, is not due to the fact that karate is a real martial arts these days. It's a sport, but like all sports it improves your strenght, stamina and coordination.

And well the coordination of a drunk is not exactly big. Also to the original poster. you want to martia larts that's good for the real world, but don't like krav maga because it has groin hits? Isn't that a little oxymoron? Every martial art is about disabling your opponent and one of the most oeffective if not only ways to do so is trough pain.




Captain Fist

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#8 10 years ago

How is a sport?




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#9 10 years ago
BadHairDay;45645006 Great Martial Arts for Killing a Man With Your Bare Hands | Cracked.com I think this fits the description.

Got to admit just the title of that one makes me go, 'hmm, that ain't looking too good.' Self defence is not necessarily about what's the most physically effective, at the end of the day you have to be prepared for a situation where you'll have to stand up in court and justify your use of force.

The legal standard for self defence in most of the United States is that the attacker must represent an immediate physical threat. The wording differs from state to state admittedly and some of them allow you greater or lesser leeway but that's about the measure of it. It's a little more lax in the UK but even then you're only justified in applying ‘reasonable force’ for the purposes of self defence, with reasonable defined largely by the jury.

What's demonstrated in many of those videos while great for ending whatever future threat that person could ever represent to you would also get you put in jail in many parts of the world. The teacher in many cases continues to press a potentially lethal or crippling attack once the opponent themselves is no longer attacking. In the Sambo one the teacher even relieves an attacker of a knife and then continues on to slash their defenceless attacker's neck with it. That's a first degree murder charge you're looking at there. For that matter anything you do after putting them on the ground, other than walking away, is going to be hard to justify to a court even if it's just placing them in a hold.




Sh0wdowN

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#10 10 years ago

Nemmerle;4564898Got to admit just the title of that one makes me go, 'hmm, that ain't looking too good.' Self defence is not necessarily about what's the most physically effective, at the end of the day you have to be prepared for a situation where you'll have to stand up in court and justify your use of force.

The legal standard for self defence in most of the United States is that the attacker must represent an immediate physical threat. The wording differs from state to state admittedly and some of them allow you greater or lesser leeway but that's about the measure of it. It's a little more lax in the UK but even then you're only justified in applying ‘reasonable force’ for the purposes of self defence, with reasonably defined largely by the jury.

What's demonstrated in many of those videos while great for ending whatever future threat that person could ever represent to you would also get you put in jail in many parts of the world. The teacher in many cases continues to press a potentially lethal or crippling attack once the opponent themselves is no longer attacking. In the Sambo one the teacher even relieves an attacker of a knife and then continues on to slash their defenceless attacker's neck with it. That's a first degree murder charge you're looking at there. For that matter anything you do after putting them on the ground, other than walking away, is going to be hard to justify to a court even if it's just placing them in a hold.

Of course one can't exaggerate, but take Krav Maga. It's for self-defense. It's not for some random brawl, it's for a life-threatening situation. In those cases, I think most people would agree that as long as you don't slash a defenseless opponent, gouging or groin-kicking is perfectly tolerable use of force for staying alive.

Self-defense is not to be confused with brawling (which is what I think a lot of people do, and what Nemmerle tries to stress). It's not something you do in a fight against someone who got a bit mad at you down at the pub, and wants to take it outside. That's just a fistfight, some guy gets knocked down, end of story. Krav Maga, for instance, isn't something that's to be used in a random fight between a you and some guy you wanna wack. It's something you use when you feel like the next 5 minutes (or seconds) may be your last alive.

And of course, Krav Maga could be used in a brawl, just not as excessively as shown in videos, but that's really up to the practitioner.