World's Most Powerful Computers 27 replies

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Lolly

The future is in my pants.

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5th July 2006

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#1 12 years ago

What would you do with a computer that can run 10,000 programs at the same time without any sign of lag? What would you put onto a harddrive that can hold the entire Library of Congress, US Patent Office, and all the data at The Smithonian 3 times? The world's top 500 super computers can do all that and more. A few of them are able to simulate an entire universe, or make an exact copy of Earth complete with AI and weather tracking.

You see, computers can still fill an entire room, but it is by choice, and a sweet one at that.




gameingfreak

The Dark One

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9th September 2006

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#2 12 years ago

Wow very cool wish i had a computer like that that could come in handy.i could think of a few things i would do with that kind of space and all that.




Kadaj

My E-peen wouldn't fit here :(

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4th October 2004

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#3 12 years ago

Donate it to CCP so EVE doesn't lag or need downtime, ever.




Lolly

The future is in my pants.

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5th July 2006

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#4 12 years ago
KadajDonate it to CCP so EVE doesn't lag or need downtime, ever.

...I share your pain.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#5 12 years ago

Wouldn't mind to have such a thing in my basement (would need to dig one first :lol: ), add a gigantic screen to it and your all set up. If you have the room and the money you should hook the computer up to various simulators (plane, train, car, combat, ...) for total 1337ness.




Giz

Massivis Effectivous

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8th May 2002

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#6 12 years ago

Livermore has been running a 32,000-processor system since December, but three weeks ago trucks began delivering the components that allowed Livermore to add another 32,000 processors worth of power to the supercomputer, effectively doubling its processing power.

Though there are still some adjustments being made, the system is now operational, said Robin Goldstone, group leader with the Production Linux Group at Lawrence Livermore. "It's mostly functional. They've actually run calculations on the 32,000 nodes," she said Wednesday. "They're shaking out the last few bad nodes."

Blue Gene/L is made up of approximately 32,000 two-processor nodes, giving it about 64,000 processors in total, Goldstone said.

A 33,000 processor prototype of Blue Gene/L, assembled by IBM last November was ranked the fastest computer on the planet on the Top500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers. IBM's prototype was benchmarked at 70.72 trillion calculations per second, or teraflops, using the Linpack benchmark, which puts the system through a series of mathematical calculations.

Lawrence Livermore's new system is expected to be capable of approximately twice that performance, making it nearly three times as powerful as the next system on the list, NASA's (the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration's) 10,240-processor "Columbia" supercomputer. Columbia has been benchmarked at 51.87 teraflops. Goldstone declined to comment on the Livermore system's benchmark performance.

The 32,000 node Blue Gene/L represents the second stage of a three-part build-out of the $100 million supercomputer that is expected to be completed by June. When fully assembled at Lawrence Livermore, Blue Gene/L will be a 130,000-processor system with a theoretical peak performance of 360 teraflops, according to IBM.

Perhaps the most remarkable characteristic of Blue Gene/L is how compact it is. When the complete system is assembled into a total of 64 server racks this June, it will be a about half the size of a tennis court, much smaller than most of today's supercomputers.

Blue Gene/L will consume less power too. The final system is expected to draw approximately 1.6 megawatts of power. To put this in perspective, another supercomputer that Lawrence Livermore will be bringing online this June, the 100 teraflop ASCI Purple system, is expected to require 4.8 megawatts.

The difference is that ASCI Purple will be made out of general purpose servers, similar to IBM's eServer p655, whereas BlueGene/L's compute nodes contain little more than memory and processors.

"We've kind of reached the limit with these commodity clusters," said Goldstone. "They just generate too much heat and too much power."

IBM is now in the process of commercializing Blue Gene and is selling a 5.7 teraflop single-rack version of the system, called the eServer Blue Gene Solution, to high performance computing customers. The company has also agreed to deliver Blue Gene systems to a number of research institutions including the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the University of Edinburgh.

This month, the Armonk, New York, computer maker plans to operate a 100 teraflop Blue Gene system at its Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. This system, which IBM claims will be the world's largest privately-owned supercomputer, will be used, in part, for life sciences research.

Translation: Power.

IBM needs to now make a Gaming Super Computer, so it can play war simulations!

Would you like to play a game?

wopr.jpg




SilentScythe

Pyro Lover

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21st February 2006

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#7 12 years ago

That sounds great, but i'm not too sure what i would do with all that raw ability... Still it would be interesting to have the ability to process all that information so quickly. What are those computers mostly used for anyway? Is it used for things like calculating the mass of other planets or calculations concering lauching shuttles? I am one of simple pleasures so i would probably just use that power to to make some overly-detailed shooter game.




DavetheFo

RogueDevil / Rogue Angel

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29th May 2003

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#8 12 years ago

Imagine the amount of porn you could download.....

Or um, yeah, you could, um, play games. Yeah.




Rookie VIP Member

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3rd May 2005

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#9 12 years ago

Probably use it for medical science. Curing cancer and all that jazz.

I mean it won't be much use for games. Most of these supercomputers don't even have modular graphics solutions.




Rich19

Italicised no more

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14th August 2004

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#10 12 years ago

It could probably store all my memories ever, and my personality. In short, I could transmit myself onto it, and become immortal. That would be cool.