Favorite Authors/Titles -1 reply

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[1.SS.Pz]LSSAH

You suck at the Internet.

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22nd November 2003

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#1 14 years ago

We had a pretty good discussion in another thread about authors and titles, and I thought it'd be a good idea if there were a centralized thread where people deposit and find some new ideas. Here are my favorite authors and titles (no order):

"The Fogotten Solider" by Guy Sajer "Lost Victories" by Field Marshall Erich von Manstein "Stalingrad" by Antony Beevor "Battle of Berlin" by Antony Beevor "Soldat" by Siegfried Knappe

Some more advanced readings: Any title by Trevor Dupuy Any title by Paul Carrell

These two guys write really in-depth stuff that's not for the faint-hearted.

I'd love to hear what everyone else is into.




The Jackalx2k

FHmod Developer

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27th April 2003

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#2 14 years ago
'[1.SS.PzLSSAH'] I felt no need to post in another forum section based on how long threads in General Discussion remain on topic.

No offense but this wasn't supposed to be in here and it's not helping the situation you just described above.




[1.SS.Pz]LSSAH

You suck at the Internet.

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22nd November 2003

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#3 14 years ago
The Jackalx2kNo offense but this wasn't supposed to be in here and it's not helping the situation you just described above.

None taken -- just trying to take the focus away from what most see as a disappointing news update.

MODERATOR: please move this post and delete my double post, thanks.




buck satan

Lion Tamer

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29th January 2004

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#4 14 years ago

I apologize if it irks anyone, but I'll reply while this thread is still in the 'wrong forum'.

John Toland "The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire 1936-1945" I just finished reading Volume 2 ~538 pages or so.. I don't have volume 1, as I got the book at a restaurant here in CT that lets you take a free book with a meal. I just started "August 1914, the Red Wheel I" by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. The bulk of my other war related books tend to center around the American Revolution, and Civil War. uhhhhh.... btw, is it possible to drive fast enough in a tractor to actually kill a soldier, or will it more or less shove them along?




Snorelax

Fat, Lazy, Misspelled Pokemon

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13th February 2004

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#5 14 years ago

Dude I'm hoping I can drive over snipers with that tractor with no tires. Looks bloody brutal. Anyways, just picked up Foxes of the Desert by Paul Carell. It's been pretty damn good; lots of personal accounts and maps of movements. He analyzes what each side did fairly well and illustrates some breakdowns in communications and intelligence quite nicely. It's an overall good read :P




SpiderGoat

Nel mezzo del cammin

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5th December 2003

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#6 14 years ago

"History of Western Philosophy", by Bertrand Russel "Guns, Germs and steel", by Jared Diamond "Stalingrad", by Antony Beevor "The Rise of the Roman Empire", by Polybius "La Divina Commedia", by Dante "El Principe", by Machiavelli "Roman History", by Theodor Mommsen "String Theory", by some guy "The universe", by Stephen Hawking

and so on :)




MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

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7th December 2003

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#7 14 years ago

Concerning WWII I'd say: "The second world war" Winston Churchill "Rommel" David Irving




[1.SS.Pz]LSSAH

You suck at the Internet.

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22nd November 2003

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#8 14 years ago
SnorelaxDude I'm hoping I can drive over snipers with that tractor with no tires. Looks bloody brutal. Anyways, just picked up Foxes of the Desert by Paul Carell. It's been pretty damn good; lots of personal accounts and maps of movements. He analyzes what each side did fairly well and illustrates some breakdowns in communications and intelligence quite nicely. It's an overall good read :P

Foxes of the Desert is going to be my next read -- how is it so far?? My uncle just turned me on to Carrell a while ago and I've been pretty happy with what I've read so far.




MeanMrMustard

Such a mean old man

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15th September 2003

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#9 14 years ago

Cant go wrong with Antony Beevor imo.

For those interested in the desert and Italian war and the actions of the LRDG and the SAS, I would hunt down 'Popski's Private Army' by Vladimir Peniakoff, which is basically the author's autobigraphy of his actions during the war. Its very much 'boys own' stuff, having a ripping time racing about in jeeps and getting one over on Jerry, but it really captures what I feel is the 'essence' of desert warfare. There's a fantastic section with a very detailed description of a LRDG raid against an Italian airfield that he went on, from the initial journey, the raid itself, escaping, trucks being picked off one by one by Italian aircraft and their eventual rescue. Also covers some of the less well known areas of the war, such as the involvement of the native Arab tribes in countries like Libya and Tunisia, and the fighting in Eastern Italy. A recommended read. Harry




Blistex

Been here longer than you!

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21st May 2003

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#10 14 years ago

Tigers in the Mud - Otto Carius Das Boot - Lothor Gunther Buckheim Ten Years and Twenty Days - Karl Doenitz Achtung Panzer - Hienz Guderian Forgotten Soldier - Guy Sajer Stalingrad - Anthony Beevor Fall of berlin - Anthony Beevor Day of Infamy - Walter Lord Night to Remember - Walter Lord A time to Stand - Walter Lord Incredible Victory - Walter Lord Lost Victories - Manstein Knight's Cross - David Fraser




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