Curiousity -1 reply

Please wait...

Guest

I didn't make it!

0 XP

 
#1 16 years ago

I'm just wondering something, why exactly cant u put brushes over others...

ex.: A building on a terrain witch wont cut into it (hope u follow me)

Doesn't seem to affect that much in-game cause i didnt saw any diffrences , and ur sure to not mess ur terrain playing with it. Personnaly i use carve cause i make my buildings the same gridsize as my terrain but again carving is not recommanded according to lots of sources. But if u advise me not to and to manipulate it i will, just tell me y it matters so much :uhm: I mean doesn't anybody done that when its to hard to do it? Should i have a 100 small weird shaped brushes over 2 brushes that goes over another a lil... Maybe I'm wrong and everybody does it!!:eek:




omnix32

The forums staffers think I'm Cool

50 XP

11th February 2002

0 Uploads

184 Posts

0 Threads

#2 16 years ago

Brush Construction It cannot be overstressed. If you want shorter compile times and small file sizes, efficient brush construction is "critical" in building your map. There is one rule that stands above all: DO NOT OVERLAP BRUSHES AT ANYTIME.

No matter what you have to do to build your map, do not overlap brushes. Overlapping means that all or parts of two or more brushes share the same physical space. If brushes overlap, you can expect to add time to your compiling, and add size to your .map, .bsp and, .aas file sizes.

Efficient map construction means that all brushes butt up against each other, but never intersect.

CSG Operations CSG stands for "Computed Solid Geometry". The two functions here, CSG Subtract and Make Hollow, calculate the removing of sections from that geometry and breaking solid brushes (not curve patches) into smaller pieces. Although they are convenient to use for some operations, (they often do things that the user may not care for. These "side effects" can include breaking brushes into inconvenient parts, cutting up adjacent brushes, and creating hard to find and remove micro brushes.) Subtract

(Menu: Selection > CSG > Subtract) When you select this, the selected brush or brushes subtract its volume from all the geometry that contacts it. The cutting brush is not removed. Undo does not fix this action.

This comes out of the GTKRadiant manuel. never use subtraction or overlap brushes. you can find a copy of this manuel in the help section in GTKRadiant.




Guest

I didn't make it!

0 XP

 
#3 16 years ago

I hear u, but I'm so curious i had to test it, and the results arent concluents. Few kb's more, few secs more. Basicly i was wondering if it could cause errors or if the engine had troubles handeling it cause i pretty much knew it wasent recommanded. Anyway gotta make it the right way and u caught me I didn't read all the manual yet :mad:




omnix32

The forums staffers think I'm Cool

50 XP

11th February 2002

0 Uploads

184 Posts

0 Threads

#4 16 years ago

overlapping brushes cause overdraw on the texture surface. Quake III mappers are anal about this and clip the brushes at t-junctions.

don't worry if you don't understand, just don't overlap them as it makes the problem worse causing the engine to draw the brush face underneath the terrain if you just stick buildings in there. That will kill r_speed and incress compile times. you must delete the triangles and place the structure in that way. Alt+shift allows you to select them one at a time. It takes some pratice but once your get the hang of it, then its not so bad. once you got the outline of your building deleted you can then hide the terrain and build away.

Constructive Solid Geometry (subtraction) Is a big no no. Don't do it. there are hundredes of post because of problems using it. subtraction of terrain will almost always kill it. once the terrain is save messed up then its time to make a new one. Just take my word for it and save yourself alot of problem.

good luck.