Idea for Total Conversion -1 reply

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McMick

GF Pwns Me!

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25th August 2008

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#1 9 years ago

Has anyone here ever read "The Night Land" by William Hope Hodgson? It's an old sci-fi/horror novel from 1912. It could make a great TC for the right engine. I don't know if it'd be possible in any of the xray engine games or not, but since ShoC is a single-player sci-fi horror game, I figured I'd post here first and get opinions. The story can be read online here:

http://fiction.eserver.org/novels/nightland/

The wikipedia entry is here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Night_Land

Here's a plot summary from wikipedia:

"...The Sun has gone out and the Earth is lit only by the glow of residual vulcanism. The last few millions of the human race are gathered together in a gigantic metal pyramid, the Last Redoubt, under siege from unknown forces and Powers outside in the dark. These are held back by a Circle of energy, known as the "air clog," powered from a subterranean energy source called the "Earth Current". For milennia, vast living shapes - the Watchers - have waited in the darkness near the pyramid. It is thought they are waiting for the inevitable time when the Circle's power finally weakens and dies. Other living things have been seen in the darkness beyond, some of unknown origins, and others that may once have been human. To leave the protection of the Circle means almost certain death, or worse an ultimate destruction of the soul. As the story commences, the narrator establishes mind contact with an inhabitant of another, forgotten Lesser Redoubt. First one expedition sets off to succour the inhabitants of the Lesser Redoubt, whose own Earth Current has been exhausted, only to meet with disaster. After that the narrator sets off alone into the darkness to find the girl he has made contact with..." I should note that the TC wouldn't be based on the characters in the novel, only the world. The book is a bit painful to read because the author wrote the whole thing in a flowery manner of speech with lots of redundancy. There is a chopped-down-to-20,000-words version called "The Dream of X" but there are no copies of that available on the internet for free. Apparently, though, it's as good as the long version at describing the world, but obviously much more readable.