The Borg -1 reply

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Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#1 14 years ago

The Borg are a pretty unique race introduced to Star Trek in 'Q-Who?' I believe. Their ships were just big cubes, no crew quarters, command section, central engineering section, nothing standard. Once their shields had adapted to your weapons, no known force could get through them. Their weapons drained shields so they could calve your ship up for their technology, which was all they were interested in. Their own bodies were horrifically altered by technology, and they were strong enough to chuck a Klingon to the ground like he were a feather. Then, they take an interest in organics. They assimilate Captain Picard and have designs on humanity as well. The one ship they sent destroyed an entire fleet. Indeed, it was only stopped because the Enterprise happened to have an android on board. And then Voyager/First Contact happen. The Borg get a new Achilles Heel, their Queen. By all intents and purposes an individual, perhaps what the Collective would be like if it were just one person combined, with full control of her own thoughts. Possibly grown. Destroy a queen, and the rest of the Borg nearby spasm and shut down as well. The Federation now have modulating phasers which can randomise their frequencies and penetrate the adaptive shields of a Borg ship. My point is... when do you think the 'idea' of the Borg was scarier? Not the special effects, but the idea. When they only cared for technology, and ignored lifeforms? Or when they began to want to assimilate cultures? Or when they had a Queen, and were vulnerable to Starfleet weapons? ANd let us also leave out the crap that is Enterprise, the problems with their Borg encounter are too numerous to list, and it isn't just encountering them at all that was the problem. I'm of the opinion that the Borg were a pretty scary notion when the Enterprise first encountered them thanks to Q; when they disregarded organic lifeforms, indeed, ignoring them, and only had a hunger for technology. Kind of like V'Ger, who thought of 'carbon-based lifeforms' as an 'infestation'. That seems scarier to me than the idea of a culture who just wants to assimilate other lifeforms. What do you think?




Ensign Riles VIP Member

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#2 14 years ago

Huh, that's funny. For some reason I have a vague recollection of seeing the Borg in an Enterprise episode... :uhm:

As for it being scary? Nah, if you can't stand up to the big bullies, you probably deserved to be wiped out. ;)




Dreadnought[DK] VIP Member

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#3 14 years ago

I think the Borg are as scary as ever (disregarding Endgame). I can understand why some people thought the Collective scarier in TNG because of the mystery. Nobody really knew the finer details of how the Borg 'worked'. However, I am one of those people who like to 'know' things and this mysterious race would require a lot of explanation. This came with Voyager; here we got to know the 'mind' behind the collective and we gained an insight in the life of a drone (Seven of Nine). I don't see this as a demystification; as a matter of fact I think it made the Borg even more interesting. Regarding the Queen, I don't think 'she' should be seen as an Achilles Heel. In essence the Borg is a computer with many different components. Like any other computer, the Collective needs a central processing unit; a core. In this case it happens to a humanoid cyborg. She is not an individual, she is a piece of hardware.... She is not unique. This can be seen when she is 'killed' (if one can use that word for a computer component); if she was indeed unique, the Collective in the Delta Quadrant would collapse. This was not the case. The terminated Queen was simply replaced; just like you change your CPU when it is burned out. Voyager has taught us how the Collective works and has given us more reason to fear the Borg because now we know 'why'. The Borg is my favourite race because it is so unlike everything else we have seen and I sit at one the edge of the chair when a tiny new bit of the Collective is revealed.

:assimilate:




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#4 14 years ago

But originally the Borg didn't need a CPU. They all combined. Like a LAN without a server. Their ships didn't even have any central points; their systems were distributed evenly throughout, this gives them their resilience, adaptive shield or no. When the Queen in First Contact was killed, the rest of the drones on the Enterprise just blew up and died. How is that not an Achilles Heel? There was no mind behind the Collective originally. The Collective 'was' a mind. Deanna noticed that.




Dreadnought[DK] VIP Member

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#5 14 years ago

Wel, you have my opinion and I have yours ;)




darknights

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#6 14 years ago

The only times the borg were scary was they were first introduced in TNG when they were made more menancing for FC.....I think their overuse in Voyager made them lose their scaryness.




Octovon

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#7 14 years ago

The Borg are much better in Voyager. In TNG they lacked a leader (although that was the point), but without a leader, they lacked character a certain je ne sais quoi. When they got a Queen, it brought about the idea of the Borg relating to Bees, what with the hive-mind and drones.

Apart from the topic, special effects played a huge role in the menacing looks of the Borg and overall attitude. In TNG they looked okay, their ships were huge clumps of wire, everyone was pasty white and the lighting in the cube was bright white (reminded me of the dentists office). In Voyager they added the green lights that put more fear into the inside of the ship, it was more gloomy; the drones were givin pale gray and greenish skin to make them look more 'dead'; and their ships began to look more like actual ships.

The Borg kind of lost their scariness when they started to be over-used in Voyager, especially when they fought Species 8472, it showed just how fragile the Borg were. The Borg were thus, much scary pre-Species 8472 and pre-Queen.




Ensign Riles VIP Member

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#8 14 years ago

Yes, but having a heirarchy makes them not so dissimilar to us. Before they really lacked a wekness, now they have become more like pre-war Iraq, which isn't that scary despite what many people say.




Cpt_Romanski

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#9 14 years ago

I loved the Borg in TNG and FIRST CONTACT. But VOYAGER simply overused them. How many drones have been liberated from the collective in VOYAGER? Can anyone tell me? Braga made them to individuals. I really hoped they would assimilate VOYAGER in the final episode. But nooooo. Voyager destroyed several cubes with one shot. Now the Borg are just another evil species, sadly. :(




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#10 14 years ago

Yeah, those transphasic torpedoes and the ablative armour generators were totally unbelievable -- and I don't mean that in a good way. I think on some dedicated Trek forums its just laughingly referred to as 'Magi-tech' now. And of course, now a bunch of people are saying that a Trek series in the future would be cool because they'd all have this technology fitted to every starship... great. Really great. It's not just the Borg that suddenly become obsolete then, it's every single enemy race the Federation has ever encountered bar the Q. It was 'shocking' to see the Borg destroyed so casually. As it was before that when we first saw Species 8472. But was it good for their reputation? I don't think so either, Romanski.