Player modeling -1 reply

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DarthStevenus

GF is my bext friend *hugs GF*

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18th December 2009

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#1 7 years ago

Alright, so I'm finally comfortable enough with my modeling skills to try my first playermodel. I've decided to make a model of Cole McGrath from Infamous.

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infamous-20090320084249178.jpg

My question is, how should I model the torso and the legs? As one piece, or two separate pieces? Here are some screens of what little I have done so far.

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cole01.jpg
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cole03.jpg

I also have a question about the head and the torso. I'm pretty sure I should model those as separate pieces, but I should try and line up the vertices to the collar of the jacket as close as possible, right?

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cole02.jpg

Again, it's my first attempt at a playermodel. Go easy on me =p




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#2 7 years ago

Look at how JKA does its models. Like Kyle, has head, torso, l_arm, r_arm, hips, l_leg, and r_leg.




DarthStevenus

GF is my bext friend *hugs GF*

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#3 7 years ago

Huh, don't know why I never thought to do that. I'll check them out in XSI in a minute. Also, I know you can't rig playermodels in gmax, but can you do it in 3ds max 2011? Or will I still have to use XSI?




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#4 7 years ago

With 3ds Max, you have to use version 4-8 for it to be compatible with JKA. If you don't have any of those, XSI can do it just fine.




minilogoguy18

kitty dances for rep!

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4th September 2004

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#5 7 years ago
Xu'an;5509310Look at how JKA does its models. Like Kyle, has head, torso, l_arm, r_arm, hips, l_leg, and r_leg.

Don't do it that way, you can save segmenting for the end which I'd put every penny in my name on them doing it last as well.

Start with the head and extrude out from there, I personally never model things separate and try to stitch them together, it never turns out as great as something that flows as one. You also shouldn't just trace over that reference image vertex to vertex, edge to edge, it's pretty much means you didn't make it at all.

Looks to me like you still need a lot more practice before announcing the creation of a player model. You need to model a few successful generic male and female models first focusing mainly on the anatomy and proper edge looping and flow.




DarthStevenus

GF is my bext friend *hugs GF*

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#6 7 years ago

I wasn't really trying to announce that I was working on a playermodel. Frankly, if I didn't have questions about the process I wouldn't have posted anything about it at all, since (like my first map) I don't expect it to turn out as something good enough to submit to jk3files.

I get your point about the references though. I think I'll scrap this project for now and start off with some simpler playermodels.




AshuraDX

WTF ?! BOOOOOOOM !

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10th May 2009

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#7 7 years ago

well you CAN weight your character in 3ds max 2011 , then you need a FBX exporter plugin , to export your rigged character thnen you import that .fbx file into XSI and export to root.xsi from there

thaT's how I got my first "Semi" playermodel ingame yesterday, it's a simple rock as throwable asset




Jose Carlos

Why? Cause normal is boring.

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29th March 2006

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#8 7 years ago
Ashura thaT's how I got my first "Semi" playermodel ingame yesterday, it's a simple rock as throwable asset

Holy shit, someone's actually using that thing?!

Alright, back on topic.

You've got a bit of the tube syndrome going there, in that your torso is too... tubular. The human upper body is heavily skewed towards being flat down the back and front, with most of the curvature coming from the sides. It's also a good tactic to model so that your edge loops follow the flow of the musculature. A good reference for that are images of bodybuilders. Their grotesquely exaggerated muscles are great for seeing how things flow (like the pectoral muscle flowing under the shoulder muscles). Now, I notice you're modeling it on top of an existing wireframe. Don't be afraid to go a bit off track. Collapse two edge loops into one where you think it won't make a difference, for example. I'm sure I've got more pearls of wisdom somewhere, but they ain't coming to me now.




AshuraDX

WTF ?! BOOOOOOOM !

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10th May 2009

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#9 7 years ago
Jose Carlos;5509541Holy shit, someone's actually using that thing?!

yeah I just wanted to try it to figure out the right settings for me might release that rock sometime XD

anyway Steve , hit me on MSN about getting your weighted model in XSI and export from there




Vaders_legion

NO U

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17th December 2005

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#10 7 years ago

Alright. theres a few things i see going on in those photos. As mentioned before, WAY too many segments. Another thing, Which is much more imperative is the style in which you're modeling. I used to model the same way, making all of the edges try to maintain shape throughout the model. Problem with that is that the human body doesnt have such a perfect physique. you cant line shit up to geometric coordenates when modeling organic figures, you just have to freeform it through verts and work it until it looks good.

What i'd do to start is work from the foot up, connecting at the crotch. Usually when i do this approach, i start with a box, convert to editable poly, and fuck around with the verts until i have the general bounding box shape I'll call it. then i'll select edges and use the connect option, adding segments as i need them. Dont add too many. Then I'll form the foot. usually my boots end up being 6 sided cylanders with feet extruded and formed. When you're done with the boot, just extrude up and keep working. Alot of modeling is just horsehitting the general shape and remembering that you're not confined to 90% angles.




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