Rigid Armour Modelling/Weighting -1 reply

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The One and Only

I R Scary Eyeball

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29th January 2004

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#1 8 years ago

I understand how to work an organic or otherwise flexible-looking model to a skeleton, but what's the best way to make plate armour without odd deformations? Should I overlap separate sections or would that just look even worse?




Jose Carlos

Why? Cause normal is boring.

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29th March 2006

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#2 8 years ago

Depends. For limbs, it's best to make the armor at least a 3-piece. For the chest, you'll have to live with either the armor stretching and bending or pieces of it clipping through. The pelvis is a little easier, with the front and back pieces just hanging and the sides rigid to the thighs.




Inyri Forge VIP Member

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#3 8 years ago

It's really impossible to avoid either stretching or clipping (or both) with something that's supposed to be rigid, since there isn't any flexibility with the animations (no pun intended... or maybe I did...)




General Jaxun

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#4 8 years ago

Well, it would almost require new bones, or something for it to stay STILL. But that's impossible.




Zach

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#5 8 years ago
General Jaxun;5280240Well, it would almost require new bones, or something for it to stay STILL. But that's impossible.

Not impossible, just extremely time consuming.




General Jaxun

Don't tread on me.

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#6 8 years ago

True.




The One and Only

I R Scary Eyeball

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#7 8 years ago

I'll try the 3-part armour for limbs, I think I can limit the amount of visible clipping on the torso with what I'm planning. Thank you for the response.




=Someone=

MovieBattles II Modeler

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#8 8 years ago
The One and Only;5280087I understand how to work an organic or otherwise flexible-looking model to a skeleton, but what's the best way to make plate armour without odd deformations? Should I overlap separate sections or would that just look even worse?

Basically, you just need to look at real plate armour and check how it allows movement. It's is either soft where deformations would happen (like at the elbow, the knee, the armpits, ...) or there are leather straps that allow the plates to move (upper legs, f.i.).

Spoiler: Show
AR006_H031_Option.JPGAR006_Back.JPG

Note how the inside of the elbow bit is actually open, soft and just protected from the side, same goes for the armpits.

For the legs, f.i., three pieces would do the trick: one fore the femur, one for the tibia and one for the foot itself (you could make four, to add a kneecap, of course).

For the torso, well, due to the way the arm movement is affected by it, you can't really do much there anyways without making the arms and shoulders look weird during anims. With it's 3 bones, the torso itself doesn't move much anyways and you say you know how to weight, so you know that already and shouldn't have any issue with that either way.




Maveritchell

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#9 8 years ago
=Someone=;5280607For the torso, well, due to the way the arm movement is affected by it, you can't really do much there anyways without making the arms and shoulders look weird during anims. With it's 3 bones, the torso itself doesn't move much anyways and you say you know how to weight, so you know that already and shouldn't have any issue with that either way.

Without knowing what you want the model to look like, you can always exaggerate the size of the pauldrons, weighted to the upper torso (ribcage? I dunno what the bones are for JKA models) and let the clipping happen out of sight. Stylistically it may not be what you want, but if you allow yourself a little flexibility designwise you can allow yourself a little rigidity modelwise.