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ikyojo

AKA Daxs

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26th July 2007

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#1 9 years ago

Ok I have 3 Questions Q1. Is AA any good and would i notice it on a small monitor say at a res 1280x1024 and is it just a huge fps hog? Q2. Is AF any good or dose it hog fps or cpu use? Q3. Should u leave vsync on or off and is there any point in having it either way?




Babeman

A dog+sombrero=awesome.

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11th August 2008

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#2 9 years ago

1. AA (anti-aliasing) just improves the edge smoothness of textures, so if you don't want your game to look like its made of bricks, then 2x, or 4x is sufficient. AA is a pretty big resource hog, depending on the setting your on. 4x or 8x should degrade performance by quite a bit.

2. AF (anisotropic filtering) improves the sharpness of textures, this doesn't degrade performance by much (usually), but can in some situations, so experiment and see if it hurts your fps,

3. Vsync (vertical synchronization) is a feature used in games to synchronize each frame to your monitors refresh rate to prevent 'tearing' of the textures. It doesn't degrade performance at all (at least with my experience) in any game, but does cap your FPS depending on your refresh rate. My monitors refresh rate is 60hz, therefore my fps will be capped to 60fps. It should only be enabled if you have any problems with the game looking like its tearing or choppy when you have 60+fps.

Anyone feel free to correct me if I'm wrong on any of these.




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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23rd November 2002

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#3 9 years ago
ikyojo;4937844Ok I have 3 Questions Q1. Is AA any good and would i notice it on a small monitor say at a res 1280x1024 and is it just a huge fps hog? Q2. Is AF any good or dose it hog fps or cpu use? Q3. Should u leave vsync on or off and is there any point in having it either way?

A1. Anti-Aliasing smooths the entire image, and you will probably notice a slight difference at 1280x1024. I would probably recommend 2xAA.

A1a. It can be a resource intensive feature. If your card can provide more than 100 FPS without vsync, and doesn't drop below 50 FPS with AA on, it would be better to run it.

A2. Anistroptic Filtering serves about the same purpose as Anti-Aliasing. It is not as much of a resource hog, and still provides a noticeable decrease in jaggines.

A3. On. There is very little reason to run without vsync on your system. So keep it on, unless you experience difficulties.




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

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8th October 2006

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#4 9 years ago

A1. Anti-Aliasing smooths the entire image, and you will probably notice a slight difference at 1280x1024. I would probably recommend 2xAA.

A1a. It can be a resource intensive feature. If your card can provide more than 100 FPS without vsync, and doesn't drop below 50 FPS with AA on, it would be better to run it.

A2. Anistroptic Filtering serves about the same purpose as Anti-Aliasing. It is not as much of a resource hog, and still provides a noticeable decrease in jaggines.

A3. On. There is very little reason to run without vsync on your system. So keep it on, unless you experience difficulties.

1. AA (anti-aliasing) just improves the edge smoothness of textures, so if you don't want your game to look like its made of bricks, then 2x, or 4x is sufficient. AA is a pretty big resource hog, depending on the setting your on. 4x or 8x should degrade performance by quite a bit.

2. AF (anisotropic filtering) improves the sharpness of textures, this doesn't degrade performance by much (usually), but can in some situations, so experiment and see if it hurts your fps,

3. Vsync (vertical synchronization) is a feature used in games to synchronize each frame to your monitors refresh rate to prevent 'tearing' of the textures. It doesn't degrade performance at all (at least with my experience) in any game, but does cap your FPS depending on your refresh rate. My monitors refresh rate is 60hz, therefore my fps will be capped to 60fps. It should only be enabled if you have any problems with the game looking like its tearing or choppy when you have 60+fps.

:agreed: Yeah, that.

I would also add that if there is an option in the game you're playing for triple buffering, that should be enabled in preference to vsync.




*The.Doctor

Trust me, I'm a Doctor

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25th November 2003

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#5 9 years ago

Yes, AA is a good thing. A very good thing. I try to run at least 2X AA with every game. It definitely does make a noticeable difference even at 1920x1080, and even more so at lower resolutions.

2. AF (anisotropic filtering) improves the sharpness of textures, this doesn't degrade performance by much (usually), but can in some situations, so experiment and see if it hurts your fps,

Just too add to/clarify that, AF greatly increases the distance at which textures look clear, or sharp, and not blurry. Distant objects will look much more detailed a long distances the higher you crank AF up. It doesn't do a whole lot for the jaggies though. Results do vary widely from game to game though. I run max AF all the time. I don't bother with in-game AF settings, i just set it to 16X in the CCC and forget about it. I haven't had a issue with it degrading performance to unplayable levels like AA can.

Also, i'm not sure so don't quote me on this, but i've heard that AA and AF settings are best set in the driver control panel itself instead of using the in-game settings whenever possible.

It doesn't degrade performance at all (at least with my experience) in any game

I can think of one exception to that: Dead Space. It runs like crap with Vsync on, even though the framerate is still a solid 60, turn Vsync off and its smooth as butter.

From what i've seen, Vsync is best left off like babeman said unless your getting major tearing. Running with Vsync on in certain games can actually make it perform worse (laggy or jumpy) than any problems slight tearing here and there might cause.




ikyojo

AKA Daxs

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26th July 2007

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#6 9 years ago

Cool thanks for your help guys on my system i generally have AA x4 in all games i don't play to many intense games like crysis i mainly play tf2 and wow and I also run AF at x8 in all games to it just makes them look nice. I will remember to turn vsync off in most games expect really old ones like 1.6 where if i have it off it looks like im speed hacking.:)




*Daedalus

A Phoenix from the ashes

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18th April 2006

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#7 9 years ago

I usually run games at 0xAA/16xAF or 2/4xAA.

There's also AO in the new drivers. ;) (nVidia only) Ambient Occlusion. Not all games support it, but it basically improves the realism of lighting and shadows in games. Some games, even if enabled, and supported, it won't make a really big difference. In others, the difference is startling.

I'm gonna also add in here that you should always set these settings withing the driver control panel. It'll give you much smoother performance and won't hurt your FPS as much.




*The.Doctor

Trust me, I'm a Doctor

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25th November 2003

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#8 9 years ago

Make sure you get it from here:

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Otherwise you'll be getting 9.6 since 10 isn't in final release yet.




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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#9 9 years ago
Monster_user;4937883Anistroptic Filtering serves about the same purpose as Anti-Aliasing. It is not as much of a resource hog, and still provides a noticeable decrease in jaggines.

AF is primarily a feature that sharpens overall textures, not edges specifically. AA is specific to smoothing edges of objects.

@ ikyojo, Both AA and AF have varying degrees of effect depending on the game. Some games look OK at that res on a small display with no AA, others require at least 2x AA to avoid overly jaggy crawl on edges. I would agree overall that with that configuration 2x would suffice for the most part.

AF can be a mixed bag too. Some games have it set as high as 8x by default, in which case lowering it can make even nearby objects like door panels look blurrier. In a game like Far Cry you'll mostly notice it when looking at distant objects, esp via the binoculars. There aren't any rules of thumb for AA and AF. All you can do is learn what each does and adjust your settings per game.

Crysis has very complex and atypical methods of implementing AA. In Crysis enabling AA automatically sets shaders to High, but even then the foliage doesn't get AA applied due to it using a different rendering method than the rest of the game. You have to set post processing to High to get AA on all parts of the game.




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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#10 9 years ago

Ah... I see...

Can't be right 100% of the time. :uhm:




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