Advanced RISC computing 6 replies

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CyberRaptor

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#1 10 years ago

I just don't understand this concept. Every description of ARC that I've read seems very abstract and confusingly technical.

Could someone please explain it to me and maybe give an example of how it is used? :uhoh:




Kilobyte

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#2 10 years ago

For starters, do you know the difference between RISC and CISC?

From what I've read, it seems to compare very closely with the terms "x86", or "x86/64" for ranges of compatible PCs.

ARC includes the RISC architecture (Macs - Intels/AMDs are CISC). As well as several "standards" for compatible configurations.

Mac ARC x86 PC x86 64 PC Opteron Itanium PDA Cell etc...

Unfortunately, I have never heard of ARC before, and I don't fully understand it myself.




*The.Doctor

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#3 10 years ago
Monster_user; ARC includes the RISC architecture (Macs - Intels/AMDs are CISC).

Just to point it out, but the old PowerPC based Mac's are RISC. PowerPC is under the "Power Architecture", which is RISC based.




C38368

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#4 10 years ago

Just out of curiousity, are you using the term "ARC" to denote "advanced RISC computing" or the more proper industry term "Argonaut RISC Core"? Anyway, the basic concept of RISC computing is that the microarcitecture has a small set (RISC itself being an acronym of "reduced instruction set computing") of very simple instructions that can be executed very rapidly. The idea is that each individual instruction is very fast to execute and, when strung together, result in a complete operation. The basic analogy to manufacturing is that of an assembly line versus a workshop. Rather than a single skilled craftsman making something--say, a car--from scratch by themselves, taking ownership of the entire process (CISC), a whole bunch of less-skilled individuals perform small tasks that do not require a lot of knowledge and individually do not create the final product, but, when assembled at the end of the line, result in a complete vehicle (RISC).




CyberRaptor

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#5 10 years ago
Just out of curiousity, are you using the term "ARC" to denote "advanced RISC computing" or the more proper industry term "Argonaut RISC Core"?

Advanced RISC computing.

So, RISC and CISC are different methods by which the computer processes instructions? Is one more effective than the other by its very nature, or are they just...different?




Kilobyte

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#6 10 years ago
Apollo75;4347652Just to point it out, but the old PowerPC based Mac's are RISC. PowerPC is under the "Power Architecture", which is RISC based.

Heh, I knew that,... A combination typo, and brainfart. :)

Anyway. For years Apple advertised the IBM (& etc). PowerPC RISC chips as being faster, and better performing than the Intel CISC chips.

intel-snail.jpg

That is a real Apple advertised speed comparison,... The snail represents Intel compared to the PowerPC line of processors.

There are few real worl comparisons that can be made between the RISC, and CISC technologies. Most lilely, like the difference between Intel, and AMD, the differences between RISC, and CISC are found in application.




C38368

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#7 10 years ago
CyberRaptor;4349633Advanced RISC computing. So, RISC and CISC are different methods by which the computer processes instructions? Is one more effective than the other by its very nature, or are they just...different?

Closer to "just different". As with so many other things, each has areas where it excels above the other, but neither is clearly better, unless you're looking at very specific applications.