Barebone laptops? 9 replies

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LaughingCheese

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16th June 2004

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#1 10 years ago

Where can you get barebone laptops?

And I don't mean like that OCZ kit I posted about.

I know manufacturers don't want laptops to go the same route as PCs; all open hardware and such.

But I think it is slowly going in that direction (I hope, anyway), with kits from OCZ and such, that will hopefully move the laptop market in a more open direction.

I've done a lot of searching but haven't really found anything as far as totally barebone systems, other than the OCZ kits I posted about a while ago.

Or maybe I'll just get a Toshiba....some s have dedicated cards, and they're usually pretty affordable (under $1,000) =p




jjz-

Software Engineer

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16th October 2008

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#2 10 years ago

Sadly, there are not good bare bone laptop systems like there are with regular computers. The motherboards used for laptops are general extremely limiting in what you can put in.




Mastershroom VIP Member

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#3 10 years ago

I wouldn't go with Toshiba. Several of the people on my floor of the dorm I live in have Toshiba laptops, all different models. And they're all crap.

HP and Dell are the two best names when it comes to laptops.




Bs|Archaon

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#4 10 years ago

Barebone laptops have been around for quite some time, never with any real impact as far as I'm aware. Every once in a while a company comes along and releases some new ones (this time around that company is OCZ) but the barebones are too expensive, too limited, and the parts for a laptop are so expensive that it's never been a financially viable option.

You've got the lowest model weighing in at $650. Now if we go for a reasonable spec for gaming, say a T8300 ($260), 4GB RAM ($50), 250GB hard drive ($70) and, of course, a copy of Windows, say an OEM copy of Vista Home Basic ($90). By this point we're at a figure of around $1120.

NewEgg is currently selling an ASUS N50Vn-X1B laptop for $1100. P8400, 4GB RAM, 250GB hard drive, Vista Home Premium. Finally, the killer for a gaming system - a 9650M GT in place of the OCZ barebone's HD3650. With a better CPU and graphics card at a lower price it's just not a competition.

While a lot of people enjoy building PCs (me included) the fact is that most people like that are simply not daft enough to pay extra for something they have to use their time to build that actually performs worse than something cheaper out of the factory. You'd have to love building stuff to the point of it overriding your common sense to buy one of these, and that simple fact is why they've never taken off. You don't market something to gamers by saying "You get to build this but it'll be slow!" (relatively speaking) because gamers care about their speed.




LaughingCheese

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#5 10 years ago

Zamamee;4782347I wouldn't go with Toshiba. Several of the people on my floor of the dorm I live in have Toshiba laptops, all different s. And they're all crap.[/quote]

What exactly do you mean by 'crap'?

Spec wise, build quality, both?=p

I assume you mean spec wise, and I would probably agree with you, but it depends on what they're used for, and what you compare. (Asus>Toshiba, but if your not looking to game Toshiba is ok I think.)

HP and Dell are the two best names when it comes to laptops.

HP has terrible touchpads, and while I don't intend to use touchpads much or at all with my laptop, if I do have to use it I would like a nice one like Asus's.

[quote=Bs|Archaon;4782379]Barebone laptops have been around for quite some time, never with any real impact as far as I'm aware. Every once in a while a company comes along and releases some new ones (this time around that company is OCZ) but the barebones are too expensive, too limited, and the parts for a laptop are so expensive that it's never been a financially viable option.

Actually everything else isn't too expensive (HDD, wifi and ram). Unfortunately its the CPU and OS that's the really expensive part, and makes the cost unfeasable.

You've got the lowest weighing in at $650. Now if we go for a reasonable spec for gaming, say a T8300 ($260), 4GB RAM ($50), 250GB hard drive ($70) and, of course, a copy of Windows, say an OEM copy of Vista Home Basic ($90). By this point we're at a figure of around $1120.

$610 on amazon, free shipping no tax w00t.=p But yes, the total cost is still too expensive.

[quote]NewEgg is currently selling an ASUS N50Vn-X1B laptop for $1100. P8400, 4GB RAM, 250GB hard drive, Vista Home Premium. Finally, the killer for a gaming system - a 9650M GT in place of the OCZ barebone's HD3650. With a better CPU and graphics card at a lower price it's just not a competition.

Ah, so 9650M GT>HD3650?

I've had my eye on the N50Vn-B1B .

While a lot of people enjoy building PCs (me included) the fact is that most people like that are simply not daft enough to pay extra for something they have to use their time to build that actually performs worse than something cheaper out of the factory. You'd have to love building stuff to the point of it overriding your common sense to buy one of these, and that simple fact is why they've never taken off. You don't market something to gamers by saying "You get to build this but it'll be slow!" (relatively speaking) because gamers care about their speed.

Too true. Thanks for your input!




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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#6 10 years ago

Sooo what Bs said, and it's sad. Kinda understandable given that parts are micro sized for LTs, but on the other hand, they've been making them for so long and selling them in such large quantities I feel the time has come for more affordable modular LTs.

On Toshiba LTs, I wouldn't necessarily say all are bad with such a blanket statement. As far as I know the leading cause of failure with some of them (older Satellite models) is overheating CPUs due to a poor heatsink design. From a bit of checking I've done they seemed to have gone to a different type of HS, more like that which HP uses. The one they used to use had a big plate which trapped heat and dust. The new ones have a smaller HS connected to a long copper heatpipe at the end of which is a fin block and fan.

IMO they really should have stopped calling them Satellites when they went to this design to avoid any astigmatism about them.




LaughingCheese

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#7 10 years ago
>Omen<;4783423Sooo what Bs said, and it's sad. Kinda understandable given that parts are micro sized for LTs, but on the other hand, they've been making them for so long and selling them in such large quantities I feel the time has come for more affordable modular LTs.

QFT

On Toshiba LTs, I wouldn't necessarily say all are bad with such a blanket statement. As far as I know the leading cause of failure with some of them (older Satellite s) is overheating CPUs due to a poor heatsink design. From a bit of checking I've done they seemed to have gone to a different type of HS, more like that which HP uses. The one they used to use had a big plate which trapped heat and dust. The new ones have a smaller HS connected to a long copper heatpipe at the end of which is a fin block and fan.

Interesting, first I've heard of that.




Junk angel

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#8 10 years ago

To be honest, I've heard overheating to be a major gripe of dells...

I guess it always strongly depends on the model in question.




Mastershroom VIP Member

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#9 10 years ago

Junk angel;4784238To be honest, I've heard overheating to be a major gripe of dells...

I guess it always strongly depends on the model in question.

I've had this one for over 6 months, and never had any overheating issues, running at full display brightness, sometimes running games for hours at a time.




&gt;Omen&lt;

Modern Warfare

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#10 10 years ago

It CAN of course depend on the user. A lot of Dell owners are probably not treating their LTs very well.