Buying a Computer...Many questions indeed. 11 replies

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Botdra Lar'les

Master FUFer

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27th May 2007

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#1 10 years ago

Hey guys. So I need to buy my own computer as using my dads is just getting old and tiring. Considering that I take up 230GB of his 250GB hard drive with still needing about a dozen USB's to hold all of my stuff, I think this is a good time. Plus, I'm going to need it for work after school, not to mention I need it in order to create an application to a few schools.

1) PC or Mac? I want to move to a Mac but I've been a PC user since my first computer. I looooove Macs for two reasons mainly over PCs, the fact that I can use Logic Pro 8, my favorite recording program in the world, and I can also run Boot Camp on it. Now here's the dilemma, will Boot Camp run everything I need or would use on a PC? I mean obviously it will run MSPaint and whatnot but are there any limits to Boot Camp as far as what it can do or what it can run?

2) If I get a PC, XP or Vista? Which version? I was thinking about doing a dual boot, but that is out of the question cost-wise.

3) I know nothing about Mac OS's, so if I were to get one, which one? All I know is that if I buy Leopard it comes with Boot Camp so that's a plus.

4) I will be mainly using this computer for video games, and music/recording. Problem is, I want a laptop as I will be getting this computer sometime around grade twelve, as I need to save money for a missions trip next year. I will be able to start saving money around late July of 2009. My point being, I need it in laptop form, not desktop. That being said, it won't be as good as a desktop, so this will need to be a much better laptop than normal. Bottom line: laptop.

5) Anyone suggest any specs or anything?

Thank you all for reading this.




Fetter

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14th October 2006

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#2 10 years ago

1) PC. Don't know much about boot camp so i'm afraid i can't help you there.

2) XP, hands down. Most software still runs on it, and you don't get the huge amount of technical issues that comes with Vista. Plus it doesn't take up as much space as vista does. 3) Get the latest version of OS X. Mac cuts support for any of their older OS software after about a year. 4) If you want to play any of the latest games that are coming out, expect to pay quite a fee for a laptop. Also, this ties into your previous question about Mac or PC. Mac has hardly any games going for it, whereas PC has a massive amount of high quality games.




Botdra Lar'les

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#3 10 years ago

Fetter;46160401) PC. Don't know much about boot camp so i'm afraid i can't help you there.

2) XP, hands down. Most software still runs on it, and you don't get the huge amount of technical issues that comes with Vista. Plus it doesn't take up as much space as vista does. 3) Get the latest version of OS X. Mac cuts support for any of their older OS software after about a year. 4) If you want to play any of the latest games that are coming out, expect to pay quite a fee for a laptop. Also, this ties into your previous question about Mac or PC. Mac has hardly any games going for it, whereas PC has a massive amount of high quality games.

Thanks for the reply.

On number four, couldn't you just run the games on Boot Camp?




Fetter

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#4 10 years ago

I've really no idea. The other night someone mentioned on TF2 that they were running it on a mac, but they didn't go into detail as to how.




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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23rd November 2002

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#5 10 years ago

Mac OS X now supports the Codeweavers compatibility Software "Crossover".

With Crossover most basic Windows Apps, "IE6", Paint, Solitaire, Minesweeper etc, are able to run in non-Windows OSes.

More complicated software may have a few issues, and may not work if not officially supported. Microsoft Office, and Source Engine games are top priority.




Botdra Lar'les

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#6 10 years ago

Monster_user;4616193Mac OS X now supports the Codeweavers compatibility Software "Crossover".

With Crossover most basic Windows Apps, "IE6", Paint, Solitaire, Minesweeper etc, are able to run in non-Windows OSes.

More complicated software may have a few issues, and may not work if not officially supported. Microsoft Office, and Source Engine games are top priority.

Thank you! That was quite helpful. But a couple questions, isn't there Orange Box for Mac? Or at least Half-Life 2? If so, then does that mean that Crossover allows you to run PC CD-Roms on your Mac? How exactly does this work? I just don't want to go out and buy Mac version of all these game I already have y'know?




Kilobyte

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#7 10 years ago

Unfortunately, Valve's STEAM software is not available for the Macintosh, so none of the Half-Life 2 games will run.

What CrossOver is, is a collection of 'Windows Compatible" files that provide compatibility with Windows programs. These are not the Official Microsoft files, and so are not 100%. Unlike BootCamp. CrossOver is NOT Windows.

Many PC CD-ROMs will run, especially the more basic programs. DirectX games do not always work.

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BootCamp is merely a Patch for the Mac, to allow it to boot into Windows XP or Vista (newer macs). If you load a full version of Windows, there will be no difference between your Mac, and any other PC, except the Mac runs OSX.

Both of these ONLY work on Intel Macs. Which are just PCs anyway. Neither work on older PowerPC or G5 Macs, which cannot run most PC CD-ROM games period.

BootCamp is 100%, and CrossOver is not.

The Spec's to look for on an Intel Mac, are the same as on the PC. A Dual Core Intel processor, a high end Geforce 9 series, or Radeon HD series graphics card. Two or more Gigs of RAM, more than 320gb of disk space, etc...




*Daedalus

A Phoenix from the ashes

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18th April 2006

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#8 10 years ago

Personally I'd say get a PC. The reason you want a Mac is so that one program you like will run, verus the dozens that may not if you do get a Mac.




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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#9 10 years ago

Newer Macs, often referred to as Intel Macs, or Mactels, are nothing more than fancy PCs.

The programs are not incompatible with the Mac, just the Apple MacOS X Operating System (which works with some Dell computers, etc...).

The only problem is the added cost of Windows.

1. If you can afford it, why settle for lesser programs?

2. If you can't afford extra for a second OS, then there are alternatives for each OS.




Bs|Archaon

I would die without GF

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15th March 2006

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#10 10 years ago

1) The only difference that you'll notice between a Mac running Windows with Boot Camp and a PC running Windows is that Apple rips you off on their hardware, consequently the Mac you'll end up with an inferior specification compared to the PC you could build or buy at the same price point.

2) I'd say Vista, others would disagree. To be honest I'd also question the point of dual booting two kinds of Windows OS. But your question raises a point: if you can't afford an extra $100 or whatever to get an OEM copy of the other version of Windows to dual boot, how the hell are you going to afford a Mac? Let alone a decent Mac that offers any kind of gaming power? If you buy a Mac you're going to have to buy a copy of Windows to run on it anyway.

3) If you buy a new Mac, you get the latest version of Mac OS with it, that's all you need to know. If you buy a used Mac then 10.4 (Tiger) is good, but 10.5 (Leopard) is better as long as it's a fairly modern machine. I believe 10.6 (Snow Leopard) is expected around the middle of next year so who knows what will be around by the time you actually buy this laptop.

4) If you're looking for a machine that has even the slightest chance of playing games in the future then you're looking at a PC because I can guarantee that you'll get a faster machine for your money.

5) There's absolutely no point in us recommending a specification or specific model when you can't even start saving until halfway through next year. That's a cold, hard fact of computing that you need to start getting used to.




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