Buying a new video card 11 replies

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SteelSabre

Skeptix

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27th May 2005

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#1 10 years ago

I currently have an 8800GTS 640MB and it's obviously not getting the job done for ArmA. I have been following with the latest video card tech in like 2 years so I'm a little misguided on which is best bang for buck. No preference on the ATi/Nvidia thing, but I've been reading the new ATi cards are pretty good[?]. My price range is $150-$200, with possible leeway if spending a little more gets me significant improvement.

My CPU may bottleneck the card a little bit, C2D E6600, but upgrading that is for the future... anywho, help? :D




Mastershroom Advanced Member

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18th November 2004

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#2 10 years ago

For that price range, 3 choices come to my mind; the ATi 5770 ($150-200) and 5830 ($200+), and the nVidia GTX 460 ($200).

I would personally go with the 460 at this point. It outperforms the 5770 and at stock speeds is competitive with the 5830. Supposedly it overclocks well, and can easily tangle with the $300 5850 when overclocked. And apparently it's much better with heat and power management than the previous Fermi cards have been.




kow_ciller

Gettin' hardware chilly

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16th June 2004

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#3 10 years ago

The GTX460 looks to be a nice card for the $200-ish price range but you need to get the 1gb card if you want the full amount of speed out of your card and that $50 price bump puts it into the price range of a 5850 which it needs to be overclocked in order to match it, then if you overclock the 5850 the gap grows. The 768mb gtx460 should be alright if you run at a low resolution and will overclock better than the 1gb card (but is slower clock for clock due to less ROP/L2 cache)




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

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8th October 2006

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#4 10 years ago

Get the 460. Depending on your resolution the extra 256MB shouldn't matter too much. Overclock that CPU and you should be able to get the most out of the 460.




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#5 10 years ago

I'd go 460 1GB due to more ROPs, higher mem bus, and more mem, esp if you plan on going higher than 1680x1050 res.

Bjorn3D took a reference Nvidia 460 and got a whopping 855MHz out of it. Factory OCed models range as high as 800MHz. What's even more incredible is they didn't even increase the fan speed. http://www.bjorn3d.com/read.php?cID=1899&pageID=9323

According to EVGA, and I still can't believe this, even their 768MHz 1GB SuperClocked 460 requires only 24A on the 12V rail. Various tests across the net on the 460 show the overall system wattage running not much lower than with a 470, but when it comes to power loads, amperage is key. You could easily run a couple 460s in dual SLI with a 650w PSU, and maybe even as low a 500w, because the rule of thumb is at least 1.5 times the amperage recs of one card for dual SLI, and lots of 500w PSU have 36A.

Things are looking good for Nvidia, but I'd like to see them take this one step further and make higher end GF104 chips. Add to that dual GPU and 28nm, and the results would no doubt be great.




SteelSabre

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#6 10 years ago

>Omen<;5357531I'd go 460 1GB due to more ROPs, higher mem bus, and more mem, esp if you plan on going higher than 1680x1050 res.

Bjorn3D took a reference Nvidia 460 and got a whopping 855MHz out of it. Factory OCed models range as high as 800MHz. What's even more incredible is they didn't even increase the fan speed. Nvidia GTX-460(s) 768MB & 1GB - Bjorn3D.com

According to EVGA, and I still can't believe this, even their 768MHz 1GB SuperClocked 460 requires only 24A on the 12V rail. Various tests across the net on the 460 show the overall system wattage running not much lower than with a 470, but when it comes to power loads, amperage is key. You could easily run a couple 460s in dual SLI with a 650w PSU, and maybe even as low a 500w, because the rule of thumb is at least 1.5 times the amperage recs of one card for dual SLI, and lots of 500w PSU have 36A.

Things are looking good for Nvidia, but I'd like to see them take this one step further and make higher end GF104 chips. Add to that dual GPU and 28nm, and the results would no doubt be great.

If I'm gonna break 200, I just want to go a bit over. I'd assume this would be an good target? : Newegg.com - EVGA 768-P3-1362-TR GeForce GTX 460 (Fermi) Superclocked 768MB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card




SteelSabre

Skeptix

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#7 10 years ago

>Omen<;5357531I'd go 460 1GB due to more ROPs, higher mem bus, and more mem, esp if you plan on going higher than 1680x1050 res.

Bjorn3D took a reference Nvidia 460 and got a whopping 855MHz out of it. Factory OCed models range as high as 800MHz. What's even more incredible is they didn't even increase the fan speed. Nvidia GTX-460(s) 768MB & 1GB - Bjorn3D.com

According to EVGA, and I still can't believe this, even their 768MHz 1GB SuperClocked 460 requires only 24A on the 12V rail. Various tests across the net on the 460 show the overall system wattage running not much lower than with a 470, but when it comes to power loads, amperage is key. You could easily run a couple 460s in dual SLI with a 650w PSU, and maybe even as low a 500w, because the rule of thumb is at least 1.5 times the amperage recs of one card for dual SLI, and lots of 500w PSU have 36A.

Things are looking good for Nvidia, but I'd like to see them take this one step further and make higher end GF104 chips. Add to that dual GPU and 28nm, and the results would no doubt be great.

I have a 750W, so SLI would be a consideration in this case. If I'm gonna break 200, I just want to go a bit over. I'd assume this would be a good target? : Newegg

And offtopic from the quote, swaying towards the ~$165 area, this would good? : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814150447

By the way, stupid question... these cards won't insanely hot right? I have a thermaltake advance speedo, which has plenty of fans. I have NO intention on liquid cooling.




Mastershroom Advanced Member

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#8 10 years ago

Those both look fine. I'm seeing a couple 1GB 460's on Newegg...currently out of stock, but one of them is $229, so I dunno if that's too far out of your budget.




&gt;Omen&lt;

Modern Warfare

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#9 10 years ago

Keep in mind these just came out and MSRP on a stock 460 1GB model is only $30 more than the $200 you said you wanted to budget. That may not be just a bit over 200 as per the $210 and $220 models, but we've yet to see what the street prices will be in a week or two.

I would go with one that has a more tradition dual slot shroud that tightly fits the PCB though. They exhaust the heat out the back of the case better and the 460 isn't hot enough to need a dual fan or tall HS.

It's going to depend on how soon you want to buy and what res you run your display at, but for not much more, the 1GB model offers much more, which would keep your rig more future ready for a higher res display, and more resource intense games to come.

Since these cards OC so well and there are good apps to do it easily with like MSI's Afterburner and EVGA Precision, a lot of people are going to be looking for good street prices on the 675MHZ 1GB 460 and OC them. They DO run cool too. Bjorn3D just OCed a couple reference 460s, one 768MB, one 1GB, to 855MHz core, and they didn't even have to bump the fan speed on the GPU.

With an app like nTune or RivaTuner, you could set the fan to maybe 50 or 60% vs the stock 40%, and get them to run very cool. EVGA says their 460 768MHz 1GB SuperClocked only requires 24A on the 12V rail. That's vs 38A for a 470. So yeah, less power consumption equals cooler.

In the price range you're looking at, I wouldn't even consider anything ATI, unless by some chance if you wait a while they drop their prices quite a bit in this range of card, or come out with some new models in their next gen that can compete better.

Keep in mind too that it's not just about overall frame rates and price to performance ratio. In this day and age it's also about how well they play DX11 games, and the Fermi architecture is made to take full advantage of it. There aren't a lot of DX11 games yet, but there will be many more made in the months to come.

The 460 offers both great price to performance ratio and state of the art DX1 performance. I predicted a while ago the GF104 would create a big stir and open up a lot of potential for a wide market niche in high end gaming for consumers on a budget. Now I'm thinking it will even be exploited further in the dual GPU and mid to high end GPU market, esp if they use it on a 28nm die.

It seems Nvidia with the original Fermis wanted to in one cost effective stroke, manufacture a GPU that appeals to both the HPC industry and enthusiast gamers. Since they've sold most all models of Fermis so well, except for the 465 which was a flop by comparison, they can now afford to make various GPUs with the HPC elements stripped out and perhaps even take that idea further than they'd originally planned.

Sure they're losing some chips that didn't pass testing well and wound up as the unimpressive 465, but the yield will no doubt be much higher on these much more efficient GF104 chips. The mid priced GF104s will probably become their money makers. The price is low, so there's less profit per GPU, but the volume on these things is going to be quite high.




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#10 10 years ago

Save up and get a 5850 instead of the 460 gtx




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