Buying New RAM... 27 replies

Please wait...

Jedi_Mediator

The Force is my Guide

50 XP

4th August 2005

0 Uploads

280 Posts

0 Threads

#1 11 years ago

Hey! The hopeless tech incompetent is back, this time wanting to upgrade his RAM. This is the best place for me to come when I need advice in this area. Don't let me down now! ;) 1) Is compatibility an issue when buying new RAM, like it is when buying a new GFX card? How would I go about deducing what RAM would be good with my system? 2) Most importantly, why is it that two RAMs (pardon the abominable Tech Grammar!) from the same company and with the same memory can differ astronomically in their prices? Is memory and speed not the only factor in RAM upgrades? Again...pardon my ignorance. I dabble mostly in modding games, not constructing computers!




Adamus

Ginseng Addict

50 XP

8th November 2007

0 Uploads

184 Posts

0 Threads

#2 11 years ago

There are many factors involved with RAM. The reason prices differ so much is in the brand name, as you pointed out. While, say A-DATA, which has given me numerous DOA (dead on arival) chips, Crucial has always given me good memory.

As for compatibility, that's more important then you know.

Some motherboards won't accept memory outside of their narrow timings, and bandwidth can be an issue as well. You need to download a bit of software called CPU-Z.

CPUID <-- Clicky

With it, you can determine your type of memory. Whether it's SDRAM, DDR or DDR2, it'll let you know. As well as their respective speeds.

Once you determine which of the style and speed they are, post your results here.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

217,012 XP

7th December 2003

0 Uploads

20,003 Posts

6 Threads

#3 11 years ago

Try to find out what sort of motherboard you have, maybe you still have the manual somewhere, otherwise there is software that can determine your hardware.

In your mobo's manual you can usually read about what sort of RAM is supported, most likely it is DDR-RAM. Anything else simply won't fit into the slots on the motherboard. Alternatively you can simply take one of the RAM-sticks from your PC and look, often there is a sticker with a description on it.

Price-differences can be due to different configurations (if you buy 1gb you could get one stick with 1gb or two with 512mb, getting two sticks from the same company with the same size is good if you want to use "dual channel", a feature that most motherboards today support), reliability (some companies offer RAM with longer warranty) and CAS latency (a set of that are important if you want to overclock your system, lower are usually better).




arcadeplayer987

Revenge was here.

50 XP

25th April 2007

0 Uploads

1,819 Posts

0 Threads

#4 11 years ago

Get Everest(google it) to find out you mobo detailes and tell us your budget, we will recommend you some ram




&gt;Omen&lt;

Modern Warfare

50 XP

1st January 2005

0 Uploads

7,395 Posts

0 Threads

#5 11 years ago

You should also note that the slowest RAM installed is what your system will use speedwise for memory. Thus if you have fairly good RAM already (low latency) you want to try and match the timings closely if you can.




EpicLoad

OMFG!!! Where am I?!?

50 XP

4th June 2007

0 Uploads

1,648 Posts

0 Threads

#6 11 years ago

Adamus;4025450CPUID <-- Clicky[/quote] Very Nice program, thanks.

[quote=Jedi_Mediator;4025424]Hey! The hopeless tech incompetent is back, this time wanting to upgrade his RAM. This is the best place for me to come when I need advice in this area. Don't let me down now! ;) 1) Is compatibility an issue when buying new RAM, like it is when buying a new GFX card? How would I go about deducing what RAM would be good with my system? 2) Most importantly, why is it that two RAMs (pardon the abominable Tech Grammar!) from the same company and with the same memory can differ astronomically in their prices? Is memory and speed not the only factor in RAM upgrades? Again...pardon my ignorance. I dabble mostly in modding games, not constructing computers!

For the newer RAM, the lower CAS Latency will increase the price, but for most people, they won't see the difference between a CAS of 4 and a CAS of 5 (But if this is really a concern for you, then you can always OC the timings in the BIOS, it's not as tough as it seems). Then sometimes whether they have ECC or not can change the price. But is that really even a problem anymore? Also, if you have an older computer with PC133 SDRAM, that stuff is uber expensive, so that could be a problem.




*The.Doctor

Trust me, I'm a Doctor

102,440 XP

25th November 2003

0 Uploads

9,964 Posts

0 Threads

#7 11 years ago
Then sometimes whether they have ECC or not can change the price. But is that really even a problem anymore?

Unless your running a server or a workstation, your not going to have ECC ram.

Also, if you have an older computer with PC133 SDRAM, that stuff is uber expensive, so that could be a problem.

Thats what eBay is for!




Jedi_Mediator

The Force is my Guide

50 XP

4th August 2005

0 Uploads

280 Posts

0 Threads

#8 11 years ago

Hey guys, thanks for all your advice. I downloaded CPUID and it gave me all I probably needed to know. --------------------------------------- CPU --------------------------------------- Processor Name: AMD Athlon XP Clocks (Core#0) Core Speed: 2200.0 MHz Multiplier: x 11.0 Bus Speed: 200.0 MHz Rated FSB: 400.0 MHz --------------------------------------- MAINBOARD --------------------------------------- Motherboard Manufacturer: ASUSTek Computer INC. Model: Kelut 2.02 Chipset: VIA KM400 Southbridge: VIA VT8237 BIOS Brand: Phoenix Technologies, LTD Version: 3.10 Graphic Interface Version: AGP version 3.0 Transfer Rate: 8x Side Band: enabled ---------------------------------- MEMORY ---------------------------------- Type: DDR Size: 512 MBytes (poor, I know :P btw, this is the amount I have, not the max amount my CPU can take, which is 2GB) Bank Interleave: 4-way Timings Frequency: 200.0 MHz FSB:DRAM: 1:1 CAS# Latency (tCL): 3.0 clocks RAS# to CAS# Delay (tRCD): 5 clocks RAS# Precharge (tRP): 3 clocks Cycle Time (tRAS): 7 clocks ----------------------------------------- SPD ----------------------------------------- Memory Slot Selection: Apparently I have two slots total. The first one contains a single 512MB DDR stick of RAM. The following info in SPD pertains to this stick. Max Bandwidth: PC3200 (200 MHz) Manufacturer: Samsung Timings Table Frequency: 166 MHz 200 MHz CAS# Latency: 2.5 3.0 RAS# to CAS#: 3 3 RAS# Precharge: 3 3 tRAS: 7 8 Voltage: 2.5 V 2.5 V I have no idea what most of that means, but hopefully it's enough to give you a good idea of what my CPU is like! My budget is $100 and below--I don't like to spend hundreds of bucks on this sort of thing. It's just convenience's sake, for helping with things like rendering in TerraGen and gaming/modding/loading times.




Bs|Archaon

I would die without GF

50 XP

15th March 2006

0 Uploads

5,910 Posts

0 Threads

#9 11 years ago

This should do you nicely, and it just squeezes into your $100 budget. Newegg.com - G.SKILL Value 2GB (2 x 1GB) 184-Pin DDR SDRAM DDR 400 (PC 3200) Dual Channel Kit System Memory - Retail

If you don't want to spend that much (or you don't need that much RAM) then one of these will bring you up to 1gb, which should still be quite a big improvement: Newegg.com - CORSAIR ValueSelect 512MB 184-Pin DDR SDRAM DDR 400 (PC 3200) Desktop Memory - Retail




RadioShackRob

Radio Shack, Do Shit

50 XP

30th October 2007

0 Uploads

725 Posts

0 Threads

#10 11 years ago

I would recommend just going with the 512MB, you have an ageing system there pal, and i'm afraid more RAM is not always going to help as much as it should.