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Trillian

Toy soldier

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8th November 2004

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#1 13 years ago

I'm just getting into PC's, so I don't really know much, so this may be a really stupid question! What exactly is cache, where is it in my PC and can I add more (what would be the advantage)?




Eagle One

:-D

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22nd December 2003

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#2 13 years ago

cache is part of your processer, its a tiny bit of memory that sits right by your CPU for quick and easy access, so if you want more cache, you will need a new CPU. In a CPU there is L1 and L2 cache, L3 are also found in server CPUs like Intel Xeons as you might guess, the L1 cache is the closest to your processor and therefore holds a smaller amount, followed then by L2.




metal_militia

Killing is my business...

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29th November 2004

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#3 13 years ago

Cache is memory built directly into a component or peripheral. For example a CD ROM has cache which means it does not have to constantly spin. When refering to CPU cache it is typically SRAM (static ram) which is much faster than, say, DDR but also much more expensive. This is the reason you do not get very much of it. Cache is easier to explain when talking about software caches, for example when streaming a video data is cached as it can be downloaded at a faster or slower rate than you are watching it so it needs to be temporarily stored. I cant rember exactly what CPU cache stores but i would imagine it is used to hold data before it can be processed (and after?). So it might look like: HardDrive -> RAM -> CPU cache -> CPU You cannot add more cache without buying a new piece of harware e.g. HDD.




Trillian

Toy soldier

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8th November 2004

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#4 13 years ago

I bought a cache stick




Eagle One

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22nd December 2003

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#5 13 years ago

maybe your getting mixed up with RAM?




carl4286

Revenge was here.

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14th December 2004

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#6 13 years ago

As they said, cache, is build into the CPU.. its about the size of a flea and is impossible to upgrade without replacing the processor.




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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23rd November 2002

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#7 13 years ago

Older computers, partitcularly Socket 5, or Socket 7 Pentiums, had an additional slot for L2 Cache, side of the processor.

My expereince is that that cache sticks cause nothing but headaches. Half the time the keyboard wouldn't work, or it would cause some other bizarre behavior. I've delt with atleast a hundred of those setups.

It would be better to upgrade to a newer processor that has more on-board L2 cache. Or just get a whole new PC.




Trillian

Toy soldier

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8th November 2004

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#8 13 years ago

I only bought it to have, in my collection of junk, I didn't really think I would use it!




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#9 13 years ago

Cache, in computer terms, is nothing more than a bit of [volatile] memory that stores information for whatever it's attached to. CPUs have caches (usually two, sometimes three [or more?]), as do fixed and optical drives. In a sense, system memory functions as a larger cache for fixed storage, much like a CPU's L2 cache. There is no such thing as a "cache stick," at least not by that name, anymore. But as I've said, system memory acts much like a cache for other system components.

metal_militiaI cant rember exactly what CPU cache stores but i would imagine it is used to hold data before it can be processed (and after?).

Typically instructions and pointers to registers and/or memory addresses where data is to be found.