Considering an SSD and HDD setup 6 replies

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MoreGun89

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27th July 2004

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#1 6 years ago

Heyo!

So, I have been considering doing this for a while and was asked about this last night but had no answer for it, so I'd like your input for how this is implemented.

I was considering having the SSD with only the OS (Windows 7) on it and installing all programs and saving all files to the HDD. However, the person asking me last night said (and did not elaborate well unfortunately) that they were having issues installing some programs (such as Dragon, the speech recognition and command program) to the HDD. I can only assume they would be running a 64-bit system. That is the extent of my knowledge though

So, to those who are experienced with this set up, how is this accomplished? Detail is appreciated!


Mother Banhammer



Supa

People say I post too much

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1st April 2009

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#2 6 years ago

Personally I just install all essential programs to the SSD along with the OS, and install all games and save all important files to the HDD. I do however have a 120GB SSD, so I'm not too worried about space.

I guess it depends on how many gigs you're going for. 60? 64? 80?




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#3 6 years ago

First thought is PEBKAC. Equally likely, however, is a poorly-written installer that demands to be on the root drive. If it's the former, then a solution is pretty much impossible to give without more detail. If the latter, then there is no solution. There is a third possibility, but I don't know if Dragon would fall into it or not. It's a kissing cousin of the second possibility above: some programs will install ancillary data to their default install directory (clearly), but then be hard-coded to look for it there. There is a fairly easy solution to this: put shortcuts pointing to the mechanical drive on the SSD in the location the program expects to find them. As for verifying that this may work, and to find the appropriate path, I hear that Google is a pretty good source of information...

I can say that I know a lot of people who have gone this route. (By that I mean, pretty much everyone I know who has an SSD.) I've never heard a one of them complain about not being able to install this-or-that program to the mechanical drive.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

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7th December 2003

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#4 6 years ago

I use a setup like that and it works very well (reduces loading times and is silent). The only trouble I had was from attempting to migrate my old OS (clean install works better).

I'd just install the OS, programs that load a startup and your favorite games to the SSD though. Maybe also programs like Photoshop if you use them. Something like a speech recognition software can go to the old HDD (I don't think it would benefit a lot of the higher read/write speed?).




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#5 6 years ago

Personally I'd go with a 120-128GB SSD for OS and apps. As low as they're getting in price, and the fact that faster, denser Nand is used on 120GB SSDs and up makes it a no brainer really. I've seen 500+Mb/s read/write SATA 3 120GB drives for as low as $150. If you were thinking in terms of the OS on the SSD for easy formatting, just put a 20GB partition on it for the OS.

Ironically the problem build wise right now has more to due with HDD pricing after the flood in Thailand. I was about to snatch up a couple Hitachi 7K3000 2TB SATA 3 HDDs that write at 158Mb/s for $100 each on one of Newegg's email promo deals, then the price shot up to double that. Word is it could be several more months before prices stabilize.




MoreGun89

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27th July 2004

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#6 6 years ago

You've answered my question perfectly, thanks!


Mother Banhammer



D3matt

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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#7 6 years ago

If something wants to be on the root drive, then Symbolic Links and NTFS Mounts are your friend.