Firewall? 22 replies

Please wait...

Freyr Advanced Member

A2Files Staff

46,877 XP

6th February 2005

11 Uploads

4,275 Posts

0 Threads

#21 12 years ago

Which is fine. Nobody can know everything in every area of IT.

I don't bother keeping upto date on somethings myself. Its mostly which latest graphics card is the best buy and games related stuff though as I don't need to know that for the day job.

Thats why I don't comment on half the threads, if I am not absolutely sure of what I am saying I don't say it to avoid giving someone misleading information. After all, you don't need to comment on every thread.




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

50 XP

1st January 2005

0 Uploads

7,395 Posts

0 Threads

#22 12 years ago

Like I said, at the time I was using one the equipment available was prone to slowing connection speed, and I didn't just take that for granted because my ISP service techs were saying so. You can choose to call that BS all you want but you are generalizing just as much as I to say none of them slow speed. They may have different equipment now, but I see no need to have a hardware firewall, it's an unecessary expense as there are plenty of good free software firewalls. Perhaps you're over-educating yourself in a dying technology. That's what I meant by mumbo jumbo, it doesn't apply to the average user.




Freyr Advanced Member

A2Files Staff

46,877 XP

6th February 2005

11 Uploads

4,275 Posts

0 Threads

#23 12 years ago

Oh comeon, hardware firewalls are never going to die. Its one of the base essentials for business networking, no sane professional is ever going to consider running a VPN by installing a client on each and every PC on every network they want connected instead of using a single hardware device in each office. Can you imagine trying to admin that sort of a setup? Thinking about it makes me cringe.

And I am not the average user. Nor am I a user for that matter. I might be an average network admin, but that neither here nor there to the subject.

Considering even cheap consumer devices have the native capability to do most of this via manipulation of the routing options there is no reason not to use the capability if it is available. Far from dying out its becoming more widespread and common as the capability is now commonly built into ADSL modems.

I think you are paraphrasing what I said a bit. I said "I don't see how you would possibly end up getting a slower connection." not that it was completely impossible.

Based on the use of professional hardware equipment in business networks I have worked on, and the use of consumer grade equipment for remote (home) workers that needed access to a main office I don't see how a properly configured router or firewall would cause degradation of network performance. It hasn't when anytime I have done a job, and users are usually quite quick to call you with problems like this.

but I see no need to have a hardware firewall, it's an unecessary expense as there are plenty of good free software firewalls.

A router that dosen't pass packets along to your computer has just prevented anything hitting your firewall. Any attacker would have to know your computer was there and circumvent the router before even being able to address anything to your computer.

If your connected directly to the net your computer is addressable, but protected by the software firewall. Your firewall is sitting on top of a huge huge software stack that has lots more security vulnerabilities that could possibly be exploited than a router which has a small software set presenting a smaller target profile.

One of the first benefits that comes to mind.