Freezer Overclocking – Literally 21 replies

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rick117

Im not cool enough to post

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16th September 2005

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#1 13 years ago

I was wondering if it was at all possible to just mount a motherboard inside a freezer? Do non-condensing freezers exist? And if not,,, is there such a thing as a non-condensing case or something to protect the motherboard while in a freezer? Because I have an AMD Athlon XP 2800+, and an ATI AIW R9800pro, I think going the freezer route would be the easiest a most affordable way to overclock my system, and it'd be atleast somewhat creative... :cool:




cokefizz3000

The forums last hope

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29th July 2005

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#2 13 years ago

your crazy ... the money all that would cost you might as well just buy a new mobo and cpu. though the thought has crossed my mind also only i wanted to put my mobo in like a bucket of like anti freeze (dumb idea i know)




Dipship

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26th June 2003

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#3 13 years ago

It can be done. I read an article on building a pc into a freezer on an overclocking site once but I can't find it now. You could also soak your mobo in a chilled non-conductive fluid like the old cray computers were. Expensive though... If you have on old PC that you don't mind losing, those two would be fun experiments.


When in doubt, gas it!



Guest

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#4 13 years ago

already been done, by my dumb smart freinds and I. we actually put a whole computer in a fridge. it wasnt hard to acomplish, we cut holes in the metal sides for wires, then airtighted it with expanding foam, mounted the motherboard on wood inside keeping it off metal, and made sure it was air tight. we coverd the motherboard and any other computer materials, like HDD and video card, with a silicone laminant spray so water couldnt touch it. ice formed around it, and it requied much cleaning. we used it as a server for cs: source. we attached heatsinks with no fan on the gpu, northbridge, and cpu. it lasted about a month until tragedy struck, and we had a funeral. only because of our own carelessness, we missed a small spot next to the south bridge, and it shorted. what your talking about is completly possible. Zalman makes a watercooling kit with a huge external radiator. you can just put this radiator by a cooling duct, or, like what your saying, in a fridge.




rick117

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16th September 2005

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#5 13 years ago

Actually no, It wouldn't be expensive at all, and thats the point, because I'd be putting my computer in an already bought freezer, I was just wondering if there was a way to 100% protect it from condensation, freezer burn, etc... Or if instead if I could just buy another freezer that doesn't condense? :lookaround:




rick117

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16th September 2005

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#6 13 years ago

Any other way to go about protecting the computer from frost? Cause I want this to last a while (atleast a year)... And if I got this to work, how far do you think I could overclock it in the freezer, "AMD Athlon XP 2800+, ATI AIW R9800Pro, 768MB PC2700 RAM"...?




AegenemmnoN VIP Member

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20th August 2003

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#7 13 years ago
1337cshackeralready been done, by my dumb smart freinds and I. we actually put a whole computer in a fridge. it wasnt hard to acomplish, we cut holes in the metal sides for wires, then airtighted it with expanding foam, mounted the motherboard on wood inside keeping it off metal, and made sure it was air tight. we coverd the motherboard and any other computer materials, like HDD and video card, with a silicone laminant spray so water couldnt touch it. ice formed around it, and it requied much cleaning. we used it as a server for cs: source. we attached heatsinks with no fan on the gpu, northbridge, and cpu. it lasted about a month until tragedy struck, and we had a funeral. only because of our own carelessness, we missed a small spot next to the south bridge, and it shorted. what your talking about is completly possible. Zalman makes a watercooling kit with a huge external radiator. you can just put this radiator by a cooling duct, or, like what your saying, in a fridge.

oh wow, thats some clever building ya did right there. kudos to you.

what were the tempts when you were running that little kitten?




Guest

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#8 13 years ago

AegenemmnoNoh wow, thats some clever building ya did right there. kudos to you.

what were the tempts when you were running that little kitten?

kept a steady -5c with max setting on the freezer. it was a mini freezer, not a fridge. when a bunch of people were connected we saw a max of 9c. the copper sinks on all the stuff were pretty big too. ofcourse airflow isnt an issue. our power bill was :D close to 400 bucks on our lan party nights.




carl4286

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14th December 2004

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#9 13 years ago

If you have enough money to spend and you really want temps that are below ambient (or just really low), like was already mentioned in here once, get this Zalman watercooling system, and simply place the radiator inside of a freezer. You could also either get a standard water cooling kit such as this one, and cut a hole in the side of your freezer (if your really into the freezer idea) and place the radiator so that it draws air out of the freezer and exhausts it out into the air... or you could use a standard air cooling kit and make a special flexible air duct that draws air from the inside of a freezer to the fan on the heatsink, where it would be exhauseted into the case.

If you want something more traditional (and not quite so sloppy) I suggest getting a thermoelectric (aka Peltier) cooler, or a phase changing cooler like one of the more expensive Asetek Vapochill coolers.

If, however, you can live with temps that are above room temperature (however still extraordinarily low), I would recommend something in the Koolance line. Those two Koolance systems in particular have a maximum heat dissipation of over 700 watts, which is almost 600 watts more than the most powerful Pentium 4 CPUs put out at any time. Cooling the CPU alone, your temps will barely be above room temperature. If you cool a NB chipset, a few hard drives, a video card, and anything else you can think of, you'll still be getting quite low temps on your processor. I would highly reccommend that you keep your computer out of the freezer.




rick117

Im not cool enough to post

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16th September 2005

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#10 13 years ago

Well, I want to do it for as cheap as possible, (less than $150). And I still havn't had an answer to if there would be a way to safely put my motherobard in there, and protect it 100% from condensation, freezer burn, frost, etc... I do like the idea of having the computer outside the freezer, but, I think it would be easiest, and most enexpensive to just stick the whole damn thing in there if only I could protect it..? And are there such thing as non-condensing freezers??? Cause if so that'd of course would be best.