Gaming laptop, is there such a thing? 9 replies

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BlitZ, The 57th

Fack, Fack you, Fack that

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20th April 2007

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#1 11 years ago

Like the title says, is there such a thing as a laptop that can play as well as a gaming PC. Or at least play for 4/5th of the most powerful gaming PC? Just wanted to ask, and also a poll whether I should get a gaming PC or a gaming laptop (if it exists).




Von II

aka noobst3R

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16th June 2008

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#2 11 years ago

Definitely PC, way cheaper and better performance. Laptop is portable however.

Also, build one yourself! Cheaper, better and quite easy to do. Makes you happy when you finish it and fire it up. :D

And OEM pc's like Dell and such have a psu suitable for the system, just a new gpu or cpu upgrade isn't always possible, and it's not always overclockable.




Mastershroom Advanced Member

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18th November 2004

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#3 11 years ago

There are plenty of excellent gaming laptops. Just give us a budget. ;)

For around $1,500, check out the Asus G-series. There's the G60VX, which is a 15.6" gaming notebook armed with the nVidia GTX 260M graphics card and can be configured with any T- or P-series Core 2 Duo or Q- series Core 2 Quad. They also have the G72GX, which is essentially the same thing, but in a 17.3" body instead. Their newest addition is the G51J, a 15.6" with the mobile Core i7 720QM, also with the GTX 260M.

Alienware (now owned by Dell) has some excellent gaming portables as well, namely the M15X and M17X. The M15X is a 15.4" laptop with the mobile Core i7 as well, although you can configure it up to the i7 Extreme 920XM. It can be configured with either the GT 240M or GTX 260M for graphics. The M17X is a based on a platform a few months older, so it uses Core 2 series CPUs instead of mobile i7s (any Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad or Core 2 Extreme, up to the QX9300). Graphics is where it really shines, though; you can configure it with a single GTX 260M or ATi Mobility Radeon HD 4870 (the only one in the mobile market with GDDR5 like the desktop version; other manufacturers who offer the mobility 4870 are just overclocked mobility 4850's with GDDR3). The M17X also offers dual GPU solutions with SLI and CrossFire, namely dual GTX 260M's, dual GTX 280M's, and dual Mobility Radeon 4870's. The_Daedalus actually has an M17X, so you could probably ask him about it.

There are some other reputable gaming laptop manufacturers and resellers, notably Sager (distributor of Clevo systems, since Clevo doesn't sell direct to consumers).

A gaming laptop is an excellent choice if you go to and fro often. I travel between my university dorm and my home 2 hours away every few months, so a laptop is excellent. So much easier than packing away a full desktop tower, display, peripherals, etc. Mobile components don't perform exactly as well as their desktop counterparts, but to be honest, unless you're looking at synthetic benchmark tests, you'll never notice the difference. A GTX 260M and Core 2 Quad Q9000 (2.0GHz) are more than capable of running pretty much any modern game quite smoothly, especially since a lot of these manufacturers include CPU overclocking functionality in the BIOS, a rarity for laptops of any kind.




Mr. Pedantic

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8th October 2006

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#4 11 years ago

If you're going to be moving between places often (for example, if your work involves travel or if you live in a uni dorm for semester) then a laptop is obviously ideal; even with the weight and short battery life, a gaming laptop will be easier to move than a full desktop. However, if you aren't doing that, or you can live without games in one location, then a desktop is the obvious choice; faster, cheaper, more comfortable, better audio and video, more customization, etc. It really depends on your situation.




Junk angel

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28th January 2007

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#5 11 years ago

Well I've been sporting an msi GX630 for over a year now, and I can't say I'm dissapointed. The thing more or less is able to weather everything I throw at it, so the MSI GX range would probably be another good option.




Guest

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#6 11 years ago

As pretty much everyone else has said desktops are a lot more bang for your buck. Gaming laptops or at least the ones I've seen are ridiculously expensive and for the same price you could build a vastly superior desktop. Unless, as Mr. Pedantic said, if you are on the move a laptop may be more preferable for mobility's sake.




BlitZ, The 57th

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20th April 2007

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#7 11 years ago

Hmm, thanks guys. I think I'll go for the PC then. since I don't really go around places that much and like you all said PC = less expensive.




Sgt. D. Pilla

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23rd October 2007

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#8 11 years ago

and they are upgradable... Laptops are made for word processing and basic tasks, and for all I care, thats it. Every time I've tried gaming on a laptop designed for 'gaming' it lags out at 30FPS in most all games (mind you this was 2 years ago...)




Mastershroom Advanced Member

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#9 11 years ago

What the hell kind of "gaming" laptops were you using? Keep in mind that manufacturers will mislead you by saying something with an integrated 8400M GT has "Superior graphical performance for intense HD video and 3D gaming!!!" or shit like that. Two or three years ago, there were plenty of laptops with 8800M series GPUs, sometimes in SLI like the Dell XPS M1730. Not sure where ATi was at that point, maybe the HD 3xxx series?

Also, laptops are upgradeable as well, especially true gaming laptops. You can upgrade the CPU, RAM, hard drive(s), and display panel on just about any laptop in the world. The only issue is that with non-gaming oriented models, the GPU is generally soldered to the motherboard, as was the case with the ATi 4570 on my Studio 15.

However, in real gaming laptops, like the Asus G-series models, and the Alienwares, the graphics cards are completely removable and upgradeable using a mobile graphics standard known as MXM. It's not perfect, as there have been several changes and revisions to the MXM standard over the years, so not all cards are compatible with all others, but it works. For instance, take the Alienwares: the M15X and M17X use the same MXM graphics slot (MXM 3.0 I believe), so on either of those systems (and indeed, any other with the MXM 3.0 slot), you can switch back and forth between the GT 240M, GTX 260M, GTX 280M, and Mobility Radeon HD 4870, as well as other graphics cards using the MXM 3.0 format (I believe some nVidia 9xxx series use it as well, and probably some ATi 46xx). It has been confirmed that the M15X works 100% with one of the GTX 280M cards from an M17X. Same slot and everything, it's just that Alienware doesn't actually offer the M15X with the 280M. And there are plenty of people who ordered early M17Xs with GTX 260M's or 280M's and upgraded by themselves to the 4870 when it came out (it wasn't an option originally).

So, laptops, especially the high end gaming models, are extremely upgradeable, with pretty much everything you would want to upgrade, except for the motherboard itself, because they are proprietarily designed for each individual laptop model.

Also, not all gaming laptops are extremely expensive. The G72GX can be had for $1,150 configured with a Core 2 Duo P8700 (2.53GHz), 6GB DDR2 and the GTX 260M, along with Asus BIOS support for CPU overclocking. Plenty of people have their P8700's at 3.0GHz and up.




Oblivious

I tawt I taw a puddy tat...

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#10 11 years ago

No matter how you cut it, the desktop is superior for gaming. The only compelling reason to get a laptop is for the mobility. If that's not a major concern for your gaming needs, then keep it simple and build a desktop.