Good programming language 13 replies

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Bs|Archaon

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#1 11 years ago

Visual Basic is fairly easy. Program layouts are mostly done with drag 'n drop, and the code structure is very logical (or at least i find it to be). The main problems with it is that because it's Microsoft, it costs (quite a bit of) money and that it can only make Windows programs. Having said that, a second hand copy of VB 6 might cost a more reasonable amount (as opposed to .NET or 2005, which are newer ones). Personally I do VB as part of my degree so I have a free copy of VB 6 from my Uni.




Mr.Funsocks VIP Member

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#2 11 years ago

If you want to do websites, I highly sugest PHP and Java. [HTML in there as well]




foodmaniac2003

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#3 11 years ago

Im going to try to learn a programming language.

Does anybody have any suggestions for me, im a total newbie and have practically no idea where to start, though i want to learn a language that will be useful.

A link to a good tutorial would be nice. :)

Thanks!




Bs|Archaon

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#4 11 years ago

Ok, the forum just cocked up...read maniac's post first.




C38368

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#5 11 years ago

I cannot recommend C enough as a starter language. Solid, well-developed and reliable. It's procedural, so you're hardly on the cutting edge with it, but it's an excellent language to learn on. Useful for basic concepts and engineering principles without having to worry about the concept of an "object."

If you want to delve right into OOP, VB.NET isn't a bad place to start, other than the rather high price of entry (you're more or less beholden to M$ and their framework with this one).

Regardless of language, I'd suggest finding an IDE to work out of. It's a helluvalot easier when you don't need to worry about how to program all the graphics when you're just starting out...




Bs|Archaon

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#6 11 years ago

For clarification, an Integrated Design Environment (IDE) is what I was talking about with Drag 'n Drop in VB. It lets you visually design part of the program. In VB, you have no choice over the matter. The IDE is there and, although I don't think you have to use it as such, practically you do kinda...have to. However, IDEs are available for other languages. VB is the only one I've used, so it's the one I talk about lol.




Overwatch

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#7 11 years ago

I assume you're just making small applications?




foodmaniac2003

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#8 11 years ago

Ive decided on C.

Just how exactly do you learn it? Do you type it in wordpad, or some other app? What the heck is it for? How do i execute whatever i made?




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#9 11 years ago

foodmaniac2003;3361889Ive decided on C.

Just how exactly do you learn it? Do you type it in wordpad, or some other app? What the heck is it for? How do i execute whatever i made?

Lol. No, you'll need an Integrated Development Environment for C, as well as a compiler. Ideally the latter should accompany the former, however this is not always the case. I think Microsoft have a free Visual C++ development IDE available for download, however there is rather a large difference between C and C++.

In my opinion, you're more likely to succeed in programming if you start out with a simple language. Walk before you can run. Sure, if you're experienced enough C is a great language to write in, however if you just jump in there without so much as a cursory glance at the development manual you're not going to get very far at all.

I've been learning Pascal/Borland Delphi for the past year and a half, and I've only recently started to become somewhat good at it...and Delphi is a lot, lot simpler than C or C++.

My advice would be, if you're serious about this, look into a programming course at your school/college. You'll probably find you'd do better there than just sitting behind your PC reading a 900-page long C dev manual and not really understanding much of it.




C38368

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#10 11 years ago

Rookie_42;3361902Lol. No, you'll need an Integrated Development Environment for C, as well as a compiler. Ideally the latter should accompany the former, however this is not always the case. I think Microsoft have a free Visual C++ development IDE available for download, however there is rather a large difference between C and C++.

In my opinion, you're more likely to succeed in programming if you start out with a simple language. Walk before you can run. Sure, if you're experienced enough C is a great language to write in, however if you just jump in there without so much as a cursory glance at the development manual you're not going to get very far at all.

I've been learning Pascal/Borland Delphi for the past year and a half, and I've only recently started to become somewhat good at it...and Delphi is a lot, lot simpler than C or C++.

My advice would be, if you're serious about this, look into a programming course at your school/college. You'll probably find you'd do better there than just sitting behind your PC reading a 900-page long C dev manual and not really understanding much of it.

You're an odd one ;)

I never found the more basic aspects of C to be any more or less complex than Pascal. They're both procedural, both mature and both gave me a helluva time with writing to files :)

And FWIW, you don't actually need an IDE to program in C. It just makes life so much easier. I learned console-based C, but inside an integrated framework.

[SIZE="1"](I must admit, though, that I do love Delphi.)[/SIZE]




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