heatsink advice 8 replies

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carl4286

Revenge was here.

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14th December 2004

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#1 13 years ago

Well, I'm building a computer for my friends parents, and everything is assembled (I'm waiting for a copy of XP Pro to arrive, so I have some time to fool around). While sitting in the BIOS, the temperature on the CPU with stock cooling is about 53C and while the temp on the northbridge is acceptable, the (heatsink-less) southbridge is nearing 60C. The computer will be run inside a cabinet (one of those damn desks with a closed comartment for the computer to be placed in) with only a few mm gap between the door and the desk, and about a 4x4 hole at the back for cables. I'm afraid that once the computer is placed in the cabinet, the ambient temps will go above the recommended max of 38C (they are 35C now), and the CPU will proceed to go above 60C idleing, with the southbridge well above 60C aswell. I need to spend less than $40 on a heatsink for the CPU, and a heatsink for the southbridge that does not require mounting holes. I would really like a CPU heatsink that weighs not much more than 500g, but it can be a direct exhaust or an omnidirectional. Also, they are probably expecting the computer to last them in the range of 5 years, and I don't want the temps too high since it shortens the life of the PC. Whats a good temp to aim for on CPU and southbridge? Thanks for the help. Edit: I looked at some intel spec sheets, and they say that the max operating temperature for the NB is about 99C, and the max for the SB is about 110C. So I no longer am in urgent need of one, but if you know of one that has a decent surface area and adheres on its own (there are no mounting holes) please let me know.




carl4286

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#2 13 years ago

Alright, let me rephrase that whole thing... to save you some reading. I have two questions: 1) Can someone show me a good, lightweight, omnidirectional exhaust heatsink that will outperform the stock Intel heatsink by enough to make it worth my money. 2) Are there any southbridge heatsinks out there that have thermally conductive adhesive on the back so they dont need to be mounted with screws/clips?




Pethegreat VIP Member

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19th April 2004

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#3 13 years ago
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#4 13 years ago

Is a CPU HS a needed when you get a new PC? Im getting a AMD 3500+ or 3700+ San Diego - does that come with one or do i need another?




carl4286

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14th December 2004

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#5 13 years ago

If its an OEM CPU it will not come with a heatsink, however if it is a Retail CPU it will include a heatsink. The heatsink that comes with them generally does not perform very well though. Thanks for the links Pet. I already looked at those NB heatsinks, and they have to be mounted. I was looking at that Zalman heatsink. Do you think that it will perform much better than the stock LGA775 P4 heatsink? Noise isn't really a concern.... just performance and price.




Pethegreat VIP Member

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#6 13 years ago
JakkcIs a CPU HS a needed when you get a new PC? Im getting a AMD 3500+ or 3700+ San Diego - does that come with one or do i need another?

If it is retail version in the orange box, yes. You get a decent copper/aluminun heat sink with fan from AMD. If that is not sufficent then you can get some good stuff from Danger Den for around $200 http://www.dangerdenstore.com/home.php Or if you like air cooling, you can get an XP90-c(all copper HS) for $50 then get a 92mm fan for around $10 heatsink: http://www.coolerguys.com/840556031239.html Fan: http://www.coolerguys.com/840556001072.html




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#7 13 years ago
Pethegreat™http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16835118112

i have the one, that is not full copper. the one i have is full copper. its about the best air cooling there is. the air spreads like a small tornado in your PC to cool your ram too. with a stock HSF i couldnt OC my ram, with this one, now i can. its a great cooler, and i highly recomend this. no cooling solution, not ever water (unless external radiator) can solve the case being in a closed area, GET IT OUTTA THERE!!




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#8 13 years ago

So what does a water cooling system do?




FN_lewrbm69

It's Not Easy Being Green

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10th November 2003

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#9 13 years ago

water cooling is a system that pumps water though a coper heatsink on the chip transfering heat to it an the water is headted an pumped out of the block in to a resavwor and a radiator ware a fan rushes air past it cooling the water to room temp and thats how it cools the chip. i got 2 1 in each of my high end computers.