Help, blue screen error. 20 replies

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FireStormz

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22nd December 2006

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#1 10 years ago

nv4.disp.dll Ok..When i'm playing games, after an hour or so i get a blue screen. I wrote down what it says: [COLOR=black]A problem has been detected and windows has been shut down[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]The problem seems to be caused by the following file: NV4_disp [COLOR=black]The device driver got stuck in an infinite loop. This usually indicates a problem with the device itself or with the device driver programming the hardware incorrectly[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Technical info[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]***STOP: (lots of numbers i couldnt be arsed to write down)[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]NV4_disp[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]beggining dump of phsyical memory[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Phsyical memory dump complete[/COLOR] I didnt think the numbers were important..and there was so many of them lol. Anyway, Its obviously something to do with my drivers but i'm not sure what do do. [COLOR=black]Here are my system specs:[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Manufacturer: MSI [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Processor: AMD Athlon(tm) 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 4200+, MMX, 3DNow (2 CPUs), ~2.2GHz [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Memory: 2048MB RAM [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Hard Drive: 500 GB [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GT [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Monitor: Philips 170B (17inch LCD MONITOR 170B7) [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Sound Card: Realtek HD Audio output [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Speakers/Headphones: [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Keyboard: USB Root Hub [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Mouse: USB Root Hub [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Mouse Surface: [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Operating System: Windows XP Professional (5.1, Build 2600) Service Pack 2 (2600.xpsp_sp2_gdr.070227-2254) [/COLOR] Any help would be much appreciated, [/COLOR]




UNDIESRULES

Waffle-Sprocket is broke

11,795 XP

24th November 2003

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#2 10 years ago

nv4.disp.dll is an Nvidia driver problem which could be more than one problem. I would suggest uninstalling the display driver and then using a driver cleaner to make sure its gone, restart the pc and install the newest drivers from the Nvidia website. Good luck




FireStormz

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22nd December 2006

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#3 10 years ago

Well, i'll try that but i suspect it might be a problem with my PSU as well, not giving enough power. I have a 500watt.




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#4 10 years ago

No, it's not psu fault... If it be psu pc would turn off, not just show blue window of death..




FireStormz

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22nd December 2006

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#5 10 years ago

Oh right, well i did a search of this dreaded nivida file and found several of them, each different versions. I deleted the older versions. Not sure if that will fix it though.




Rookie VIP Member

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3rd May 2005

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#6 10 years ago
ezgass;4128938No, it's not psu fault... If it be psu pc would turn off, not just show blue window of death..

Incorrect. An underpowered PSU can certainly cause BSOD's, if it is stressed hard enough. If it can't supply enough juice to critical components under load, the system may go tits-up whilst in use.

Moving on, deleting any version of nv4_disp.dll is certainly not a good idea. It is in fact a very bad idea, considering that you might accidentally delete the active driver file. Instead, you should use the nVidia uninstall utility to properly remove your graphics drivers (and perhaps give your system a once over with DriverCleaner if you're worried), then reboot, download a new set of drivers and install them on a 'clean' graphical subsystem.

Anyway, to be honest I'm not sure that this is a driver-related problem - it sounds more like overheating or perhaps, as you suspected, being underpowered. It might even be a faulty card.

What is the average load temperature of your 8800, and what make and model is your power supply?




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#7 10 years ago
Rookie;4129015Incorrect. An underpowered PSU can certainly cause BSOD's, if it is stressed hard enough. If it can't supply enough juice to critical components under load, the system may go tits-up whilst in use.

Thanks for correcting, my bad. ;)




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#8 10 years ago

No problem. Everyone makes mistakes. ;)




FireStormz

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22nd December 2006

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#9 10 years ago
Rookie;4129015Incorrect. An underpowered PSU can certainly cause BSOD's, if it is stressed hard enough. If it can't supply enough juice to critical components under load, the system may go tits-up whilst in use. Moving on, deleting any version of nv4_disp.dll is certainly not a good idea. It is in fact a very bad idea, considering that you might accidentally delete the active driver file. Instead, you should use the nVidia uninstall utility to properly remove your graphics drivers (and perhaps give your system a once over with DriverCleaner if you're worried), then reboot, download a new set of drivers and install them on a 'clean' graphical subsystem. Anyway, to be honest I'm not sure that this is a driver-related problem - it sounds more like overheating or perhaps, as you suspected, being underpowered. It might even be a faulty card. What is the average load temperature of your 8800, and what make and model is your power supply?

I did have a very bad overheating problem, and i fixed it by increasing my fan speed and getting an extra fan. Before i did that while playing Crysis it was getting to 90o then the PC just shutdown, but now the highest it gets to is 60. I think i'm going to go with the underpower'd thing, i can pick up a decent PSU somewhere.. After the help from you guys, and various googling. I think i've defo narrowed it down to my PSU But i REALLY want to be sure before i go off buying one, is there anyway to find out how much power is being used?




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#10 10 years ago

Go out and buy a PSU tester. A voltmeter and probe would also suffice, assuming you know what you're doing.