Here we go again (new system) 20 replies

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TheClairvoyant

Living is the same as dying.

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22nd June 2009

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#1 9 years ago

I think I have decided on the video card I want. The GTX 285. Nvidia has good support and it's a single card GPU so I won't have any problems with games not supporting multiple GPU's down the road. I have searched newegg a bit more and found this computer:

Newegg.com - iBUYPOWER Gamer Supreme 928i Intel Core i7 920(2.66GHz) 6GB DDR3 1TB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285 Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit - Desktop PCs

It has most of the things I'm looking for. The GTX 285, the 6GB DDR 1333Mhz RAM, the 1TB hard drive. Here's the alternative build:

[COLOR=black]Case including 4 120mm fans and 2 140mm[/COLOR]: Newegg.com - NZXT TEMPEST Crafted Series CS-NT-TEM-B Black Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case - Computer Cases

2600MHz (5200 MT/s) FSB Motherboard: Newegg.com - ASUS M4A78T-E AM3 AMD 790GX HDMI ATX AMD Motherboard - AMD Motherboards

GTX 285 1GB with Call of Duty: World at War: Newegg.com - EVGA 01G-P3-1180-AR GeForce GTX 285 1GB 512-bit DDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported Video Card - Desktop Graphics / Video Cards

650W 12V PSU: Newegg.com - SILVERSTONE ELEMENT ST65EF 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply - Power Supplies

Phenom II x4 955 @ 3.2GHz stock: Newegg.com - AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition Deneb 3.2GHz 4 x 512KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache Socket AM3 125W Quad-Core Processor - Processors - Desktops

6GB DDR3 1333MHz RAM: Newegg.com - G.SKILL 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Triple Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL8TU-6GBPI - Desktop Memory

1TB 7200RPM Hard drive: Newegg.com - SAMSUNG Spinpoint F1 HD103UJ 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive - Internal Hard Drives

24X DVD drive: Newegg.com - Sony Optiarc Beige 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 12X DVD-RAM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM 2MB Cache SATA DVD/CD Rewritable Drive - CD / DVD Burners

Comparing to the build I have set up, it's very similar. The biggest difference I notice is the processor. I've searched Google for the Phenom II x4 955 vs. the i7 920, and my results are inconclusive. It seems like mostly fans of one or the other say it's the best and then the other side argues. The other thing is the price. The setup I have is $1,164.93. The pre-built one is $1,279.99. An extra $115 to have a pre-built system that has a (better/worse?) processor and a better power source (good for the future). Keep in mind that I have no previous experience with building computers. I have knowledge only from watching a few videos. With either build, I'm planning on using the Windows 7 RC download.

This is the monitor I plan on getting, if it matters at all. Newegg.com - LG W2353V-PF Black 23" 2ms(GTG) HDMI Full HD 1080P Widescreen LCD Monitor 300 cd/m2 50000:1 w/ Smart Package - LCD Monitors

I know I've been using a lot of time to ask questions. I'm not getting the system this second, but I'll probably have it before any substanitally better stuff is out (even if not, the only thing that will change for me is the price of the current stuff (I'm not the kind of person who NEEDS the best)). So I might as well make sure I'm getting the best performance for my money.

I plan on gaming mostly. GTA4, Crysis, CoD: WaW, Starcraft 2, WoW, perhaps others. I'm going to a tech prep class for half of every day this school year, so I'll be getting into some 3D design, among other things.

I guess the main point is: should I take the slightly better (pre-built) system or build it myself having no experience with doing so before now?

/end WallOfText




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#2 9 years ago

On the pre-built vs. do-it-yourself question: Building a PC yourself really isn't that hard, especially if you google for some sort of guide beforehand. If you do everything right chances are that the system will perform slightly better since pre-built PCs often don't have the latest drivers and often use rubber-pads instead of thermal paste for the CPU heatsinks. Once you know how to put everything together it'll also be easier to upgrade or repair the PC yourself.

On the other hand you'll save some time with the pre-built PC. Putting everything together and installing all the software will take a couple of hours. You may also get better offers as far as software or warranty is concerned with pre-built system. A weak point of pre-built systems is that they often use low-quality components. If you build the PC yourself you'll be able to make sure that you get exactly the brands you trust. This would probably make a difference if you are thinking about overclocking the PC.

As for the hardware - depending on how long you plan to use this PC it may be a good idea to just keep using whatever graphics card you have now and wait for the first DirectX11 cards which are probably coming out later this year. The downside of that is of course that you'll have to wait for a while and that DirectX11 games will only appear much later, but it may be frustrating to buy a DirectX10 generation card so shortly before the next generation of cards.




TheClairvoyant

Living is the same as dying.

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22nd June 2009

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#3 9 years ago

I currently have a GeForce 6200 :banghead: Not a gaming card at all. I'm anxious to get a new system. I don't really want to buy the newest thing when it comes out, because it's usually really overpriced.

Also, this may be the stupidest question involving building a computer, but how do you turn it on once it's complete? Do you plug something from the motherboard or PSU to the on/off button? Out of all the videos I've seen, they haven't said anything regarding the subject.




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

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#4 9 years ago
The pre-built one is $1,279.99. An extra $115 to have a pre-built system that has a (better/worse?) processor and a better power source (good for the future).

That would depend. Most games now are taking advantage of extra cores in the CPU, and it is quite plausible to imagine that before you want an upgrade that the games you will be playing will be able to take full usage of the i7's potential 8 cores, which will, in CPU-limited games, probably give you between a 10-50% boost, the sort of range that most multithreaded apps get with the i7 vs Phenom II. However, obviously the Phenom II is cheaper and gives you some extra money to tuck away or spend on whatever you want.

I plan on gaming mostly. GTA4, Crysis, CoD: WaW, Starcraft 2, WoW, perhaps others. I'm going to a tech prep class for half of every day this school year, so I'll be getting into some 3D design, among other things.

If that's the case, then I would have to say that you would do better with the i7. It is also a good idea that you have chosen the 285, since NVidia cards have better support in 3D rendering in applications and other GPGPU tasks than AMD cards. I'm just generalizing, and in some applications with some settings, of course AMD cards will beat their NVidia counterparts. It's just that from what I've seen, it appears to go more towards NVidia than ATI.




TheClairvoyant

Living is the same as dying.

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#5 9 years ago

Thanks for the help. I am kind of leaning on the i7, but I sort of want to build it myself so I know what brands I'm getting. In order to use i7 instead of Phenom, I'll need to change the motherboard to a $230 or so one. Which isn't that favorable...:uhoh: With the i7 920 and Newegg.com - ASUS Rampage II GENE LGA 1366 Intel X58 Micro ATX Intel Motherboard - Intel Motherboardsalong with everything I have listed, it comes to $1,314.93.




Mr. Pedantic

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#6 9 years ago

To be fair, that is a fairly cheap motherboard (for the X58 chipset), and for the performance and features it gives, I don't think you'd find a better motherboard anywhere.




TheClairvoyant

Living is the same as dying.

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#7 9 years ago
Mr. Pedantic;4931277To be fair, that is a fairly cheap motherboard (for the X58 chipset), and for the performance and features it gives, I don't think you'd find a better motherboard anywhere.

Yeah, I know. They go upwards of $500. It's pretty crazy :uhm:




Mr. Pedantic

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#8 9 years ago

Generally you get what you pay for. The cheap full ATX boards don't seem great in terms of stability, features, and overclocking. The Rampage II GENE is cheaper because it's physically smaller.




TheClairvoyant

Living is the same as dying.

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#9 9 years ago

I don't plan on overclocking to insane levels. I'll only go as far as air cooling and thermal grease can handle easily (that case has 6 fans :)). Many of the reviews I've seen say the i7's overclock with relative ease and they're pretty cool when they do so.




Guest

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#10 9 years ago
TheClairvoyant;4931326I don't plan on overclocking to insane levels. I'll only go as far as air cooling and thermal grease can handle easily (that case has 6 fans :)). Many of the reviews I've seen say the i7's overclock with relative ease and they're pretty cool when they do so.

If you get the right air-cooling setup, you can go a lot further than most people think you can, especially with the I7. I'm not sure about your exact CPU, but it's not uncommon for newer CPU's to hit 4Ghz on air (Though it does require quite a bit of work).