Hold on to bandwidth?? 12 replies

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N88TR

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10th February 2004

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#1 10 years ago

In our house we have 4 computers [4 users] and they all use the same wireless connection. My mom uses, my dad, my older bro, and myself. Generally if I don't have a good [or any] connection, my dad doesn't and my mom doesn't as well but my older bro says he never has any problems. How can this be? The signal base is closest to my dad, though it's not in the room he does his computer work.

I was wondering, it might be really dumb but i'm gonna say it: is there any way my older bro can like 'hang on' or 'save' some bandwidth so he always has the best connection [he does a lot of downloading and online gaming], he says sometimes it peaks at 1 mb per/sec, which I consider to be great [considering my best connection was 2.1 mb per/sec and that was while i was at college]. I get maybe 10kb per/sec on a day-to-day basis, not nearly good enough for gaming, so I just view the internet and game off-line.

I was wondering how it is possible that my bro gets such a good connection and the rest of us get screwed? Sometimes it's lightning fast [we have cable internet, phone and TV] and other times you just gotta do something else like workout or read a book [be out of touch, in other words].




Nitronumber9

I fight for myself.

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24th July 2006

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#2 10 years ago

Its possible certain programs can hog the bandwidth using any file sharing programs used to happen with my dad. Failing that he is lying to show off. Best way to get around it is to disable his file sharing programs (if applicable) or kick him off the network and see if that helps.




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#3 10 years ago

This or similar searches may get you started. [COLOR=blue]http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&as_qdr=all&q=bandwidth+sharing+in+home+networking[/COLOR] This is no simple issue though because bandwidth sharing is typically something done in business networking and those whom specialize in it are highly trained at configuring the necessary equipment. Most routers do the sharing automatically according to which LAN ports are receiving the most bandwidth intense tasks. There might be routers you can use for home networking that can be configured to limit data flow speed on each LAN port. I have an old Linksys 4 port router I don't use anymore. I know it can be configured as to which TCP/UDP ports are open or closed but I've never delved into it deeply enough to see if it can limit speed on each LAN port. I have a feeling what you'll run into barring finding an affordable bandwidth sharing program that distributes loads intelligently is having to severely cap the top speed on each LAN port. For instance say your max speed is the typical 10/100 Ethernet. If you allow each LAN port to have the max 100Mbps speed, you'll likely keep having the same problem. If you have 4 LAN ports and limit each one to 25Mbps, the bandwidth load would have a better chance of balancing. However, 25Mbps is still very fast, if it IS possible to manually set your individual LAN port speeds you may have to calculate the settings by taking your actual ISP speed and dividing it by the number of LAN ports in your home network. The trade-off of course is it's basically the same as cutting your ISP speed into one 4th of it's actual if you have 4 LAN ports. In other words if you have 1.5MB speed, you would then each have effectively about 375kb speed with 4 LAN ports being used. It might be better to try and work out what hrs of the day each will be using their PCs rather than trying to compete for bandwidth or severely cap it by dividing it equally. Of course that way each would have to stick to their alloted download times rather than hogging bandwidth on the sneak.




N88TR

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#4 10 years ago

Sounds good Omen. Thanks, reps.

Why would he need so much bandwidth anyways??




Bs|Archaon

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#5 10 years ago

Because gaming and downloading uses a lot of it compared to, for example, web browsing and email.




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#6 10 years ago

Just curious n88tr, but have you asked your brother if he uses p2p services? Often times those addicted to file sharing are constantly downloading large files. Now I'm not suggesting you start a family feud, but if he is, hinting that dad may not like that (as it does usually involve copyright protection infringement), he may back off on the constant DLing.




Freyr VIP Member

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6th February 2005

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#7 10 years ago

n88tr;4399975I was wondering, it might be really dumb but i'm gonna say it: is there any way my older bro can like 'hang on' or 'save' some bandwidth so he always has the best connection [/quote]

Yes. However, its far more likely that when doing gaming the network is congested to the hilt when he starts using it because his program is so bandwidth hungry, preventing anybody else from usefully using the net.

[quote=>Omen<;4400586]This or similar searches may get you started. [COLOR=blue]http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&as_qdr=all&q=bandwidth+sharing+in+home+networking[/COLOR] This is no simple issue though because bandwidth sharing is typically something done in business networking and those whom specialize in it are highly trained at configuring the necessary equipment. Most routers do the sharing automatically according to which LAN ports are receiving the most bandwidth intense tasks.

I'm one of those business techs. :cya:

Cheap routers arefairly dumb instruments and often don't do any bandwidth sharing at all, most people get the cheapest ones when setting up a wireless network. Routers without any QoS simply rely on the TCP/IP protocol, as this slows connections down to a reasonable speed and should allow other people to use the WAN in the extra capacity available. However, in recent years people have started writing programs to simply keep opening additional TCP sessions until the network is completely saturated and can't support any more traffic at all. As Omen said on his last post, P2P programs are the worst offenders for this which is the other reason why they are banned from every business network in existence.

There might be routers you can use for home networking that can be configured to limit data flow speed on each LAN port. I have an old Linksys 4 port router I don't use anymore. I know it can be configured as to which TCP/UDP ports are open or closed but I've never delved into it deeply enough to see if it can limit speed on each LAN port.

Nearly! Closing or fowarding the ports on the router is a NAT function, rather than a QoS, so that not really going to get you where you want to be for this sort of application though you could use it as a hardware firewall with those options.

I have a feeling what you'll run into barring finding an affordable bandwidth sharing program that distributes loads intelligently is having to severely cap the top speed on each LAN port. For instance say your max speed is the typical 10/100 Ethernet. If you allow each LAN port to have the max 100Mbps speed, you'll likely keep having the same problem. If you have 4 LAN ports and limit each one to 25Mbps, the bandwidth load would have a better chance of balancing. However, 25Mbps is still very fast, if it IS possible to manually set your individual LAN port speeds you may have to calculate the settings by taking your actual ISP speed and dividing it by the number of LAN ports in your home network.

I'm not sure of the effectiveness of the various software programs limiting bandwidth because obviously i'm a business tech and we do it via hardware, but several problems are apparent with this approach and personally, I would recommend doing it via hardware at the infrastructure level rather than on each client.

The suggestion of limiting the LAN speed is not one I would really recommend, though it could be done that way. However, your WAN speed is going to be entirely different to your LAN. If you have a 2Mbs WAN connection then so you would need to restrict the LAN speed to below the speed of the WAN to get the effect your after or you would continue to have the problem. (as the LAN speed would still be ~12 times faster than the WAN if you left it as 25Mbs, so it would still be able to take up all of the bandwidth)

For instance, if you have a 2MB connection you would realisticly need to set the limit on the LAN speed computers to a bandwidth limit of around 500KB/s, which would be painful in the extreme.

What you need is a router that supports QoS (Quality of Service) This allows you to guarantee a minimum level of service for all of the users on the network as well as prioritising certain types of traffic, so a VOIP telephone call takes priority over somebody elses emails ETC. You can get wired switches with QoS, however don't get one, it won't work with a wireless network.

A quick google search says you can get a wireless router than does incorporate QoS though. However, only the decent models are likely to support this, so its probably not going to be that cheap.

Billion 7402GL BiPAC ADSL 2+ Wireless-G Router w/QoS




N88TR

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#8 10 years ago

How much bandwidth would you say a fella needs to game online with a good constant flow of connectivity... 500 kb per/sec ??

Yeah he winks at me about his *downloads,* but he thinks it's just "everyone else" that gets caught. It's crazy, I stayed up on sunday night to watch the Shield b/c I like it but he wanted to watch Venture Brothers at the same time so when he saw me down watching at "his time" he told me he'd just download the episode. Dude, just stream it from some site, no need to download it... he's crazy [but i still love him].




Freyr VIP Member

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#9 10 years ago

No idea to be honest, gaming isn't something we really deal with in business networks. The bandwidth required is likely to depend almost entirely on which game it is, along with the number of players and the amount of objects that the game has to keep track of.

If you are going to try and ensure everybody has a reasonable level of service on your network then it is best done via QoS on a infrastructure level device, such as your wireless router or in wired networks the switch. In my opinion, trying to do it at the clients would be excessively painful and not particularly effective.




&gt;Omen&lt;

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#10 10 years ago
Freyr;4401298I'm not sure of the effectiveness of the various software programs limiting bandwidth because obviously i'm a business tech and we do it via hardware, but several problems are apparent with this approach and personally, I would recommend doing it via hardware at the infrastructure level rather than on each client.

If by that you mean it's more complex and can involve setting up proxy servers, that's what I'm finding. There are however several such types of software available, including some that are free. One of the primary uses I'm finding is limiting the bandwidth intrusion of neighbors using p2p on a cable IPS service. [COLOR=blue]bandwidth sharing software - Google Search[/COLOR]




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