Homeplug Adaptors 12 replies

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Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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14th July 2004

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#1 6 years ago

Specifically, anything that looks (and works) like this:

Spoiler: Show
19137873_700x700min_1.jpg

I'm thinking of buying some, save having cables run around the house. Just wondering if they're reliable, and whether anyone has ever had any compatibility issues. Does it matter if you're using Wireless G or Wireless N?




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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#2 6 years ago

I have on sitting on my extension cord right now.

4080e722.jpg

I've never had problems with it. They don't work wirelessly, so that doesn't matter.

You plug one in alongside the router and stick an ethernet cable from the router into it like you would if you were plugging it into a computer - and you plug one in alongside your computer and do the same as if the plug was a router....

Not as fast as a dedicated wired network but it certainly saves on the cabling and I prefer it to screwing around with the wireless.




FileTrekker Über Admin

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#3 6 years ago

They are reliable, the only drawback with them is potential short wave radio interference, it depends how good the electrical wiring is in your property.

They have the side-effect of turning your house into a low-powered radio transmitter, so it's useful to have encryption also. I think most new models of these types of devices have an encryption feature.

Also depending on the quality of your wiring, will depend how fast the connection is. It certainly won't be as fast as using Ethernet cables. If you have a lot of electrical devices plugged in around your home the connection will worsen.


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



D3matt

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#4 6 years ago

Does anybody know if Powerline Ethernet adapters work through circuit breakers? If you live in the US or anywhere else where having multiple circuits is common, that could be a deal-breaker.

If it actually works at the 100/100 speed it advertises, it's no slower than I'm getting, though I'm using older 10/100 equipment on Cat5E.




Guyver VIP Member

Dark System LordResiding In Insanity

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10th November 2004

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#5 6 years ago
D3matt;5631471Does anybody know if Powerline Ethernet adapters work through circuit breakers? If you live in the US or anywhere else where having multiple circuits is common, that could be a deal-breaker. If it actually works at the 100/100 speed it advertises, it's no slower than I'm getting, though I'm using older 10/100 equipment on Cat5E.

I purchased the Linksys Powerline system a while back and after encountering some difficulties with it I ended up calling tech support and found out that it only works as long as all the outlets are on the same circuit.




D3matt

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#6 6 years ago

Interesting, some googling says it should work "across phases and circuits".




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#7 6 years ago

I find it hard to believe it could possibly work across phases since two phases should be isolated from each other. From my understanding that would be potentially quite dangerous?

I base this on a story I once heard;

It's common here for one house to be on one phase and the next house to be on another. One dude once plugged his set-top box into his electrical outlet but then wired an ethernet cable or phone cable, I don't recall which, into his neighbours property and suffice to say the result wasn't pretty.

But my understanding of electricals isn't that great.


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



D3matt

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#8 6 years ago

Apparently newer systems use radiant signals to cross circuit breakers, but I found it hard to believe as well. Especially since the article seemed to be implying that US houses have both 220v and 240v, even though the standard here is 120v and maybe 240v if you specifically add one. Of course, 240v is really just 2 120v lines wired together, unless I was told incorrectly by my father.

2 houses shouldn't be on different phases, that would be silly. They all connect at one point. And ethernet/phone lines shouldn't be affected by the phase of the power in the home anyway, except that it might affect the clock of an ethernet cable. Either way, it shouldn't fry anything.

EDIT: I may have been somewhat incorrect. In some apartment complexes, 3-phase supply is split off into 3 separate single-phase supplies by combining Phase A+B, B+C, and C+A. I suppose that connecting 2 units on separate supplies could cause damage there, but I'm really not sure.




Goody. VIP Member

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#9 6 years ago

Sigh. No putting 2 * 120 v supplies together does not make a 240. UK is 220 - 240 Ac. USA is 120 ac. Some equipment has a small dial that you can twist to make it either 240 or 120 compliant. Here is a yt vid to demonstrate that. Should you mess about with 110-120v /220-240v settings? - YouTube

Now in the UK everything is 240 and we have a mains feed to either every house or every 2. This is a unfused feed that is between you and the national grid that has 1 massive fuse. Touch wrong side of that fuse and your dead as simple as that.

Now the good news. If one of these adaptors is plugged into a different ring main then so long as the other is plugged into another ring main that is on the same consumer unit (fuse box) then they will work so long as the fuses are intact. This because they are still connected as every neutral, earth and live connection eventually hits the same place on the consumer unit albeit through the fuses. It will work a lot better though if they are on the same ring main as each other.

Here is a very basic diagram of a ring main.

Spoiler: Show
ring_main.gif

Edit A good rule of thumb is that if your house / apartment gets its own metered electricity bill and its not "all in with the rent" then you will be fine with those adaptors and they will serve you well unless you have a few pcs running on one.




D3matt

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#10 6 years ago

We have 240v plugs here for some appliances, and that's all it is. Both wires are hot, with the third pin as the neutral. The total electrical potential is 240v from hot to ground. It's NOT the same as a UK 240v plug and will fry equipment not made for it, but it is still 240v. I have an air compressor in my basement that uses such a configuration.

Do they actually still use fuses in the UK?




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