How data can be stored in bacteria ? 4 replies

Please wait...

Guest

I didn't make it!

0 XP

 
#1 9 years ago

Normally whenever you think of data storage, the choices that would come to your mind are Hard Disks, flash drives, CD/DVD etc . However the researchers in Japan don’t think that way . The see something that is very much smaller and much more durable – Bacteria , yeah I am talking about those microscopic organisms which you studied about in your Biology class.

The concept behind

Japanese researchers are developing methods to store the data in Bacteria . According to Keio University professor Masaru Tomita who heads the team of researchers , the four characters - T , C , A , G that represents the genetic coding in DNA works much like digital data . Character combinations can stand for specific letters and symbols — so codes in genomes can be translated, or read, to produce music, text, video and other content.

What can be the advantage

And the good think is that information will be available as long the species stays alive – possible a million years . The team has successfully inserted into a common bacterium Albert Einstein’s Famous ‘E equals MC square’ equation . But mutation could distort stored data, Tomita says data are stored in four places in the bacteria so the data stay intact .

So imagine if this thing becomes possible , data storage will become so cheap as bacteria are all around us , you just need to catch one . And if you are lucky you might catch a bacteria which was lost by someone else and could contain movies etc.

SOURCE Techsense: How data can be stored in bacteria ?




Oblivious

I tawt I taw a puddy tat...

50 XP

30th December 2002

0 Uploads

2,806 Posts

0 Threads

#2 9 years ago

Very interesting. A little bit odd, but interesting. How the interface, extraction and writing process works must be pretty unique as well.

So what will happen to this bacteria if your computer gets a virus? Will it look like some science experiment is growing in your case? :p




Guest

I didn't make it!

0 XP

 
#3 9 years ago

Lol, I just wait for the day when they wipe out your memory and replace it with something that better suits their own goals.




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

50 XP

1st January 2005

0 Uploads

7,395 Posts

0 Threads

#4 9 years ago
Oblivious;4941945So what will happen to this bacteria if your computer gets a virus? Will it look like some science experiment is growing in your case? :p

LOL, coincidentally, scientists have just created a virus that eats bacteria a few years ago. I was going the other direction, wondering if building a high end rig of this kind would promote "super germs". LOL




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

234,620 XP

8th October 2006

0 Uploads

23,127 Posts

0 Threads

#5 9 years ago

I have a few questions.

How easy would it be to modify data if it were stored in this method? This is already the concept behind gene libraries, and they are very successful (though with storing the data directly as a bacterial genome and not as part of a plasmid will probably result in a more efficient process). However, these libraries are extremely difficult to create, bearing the 'average' consumer in mind, and even harder to change. Bearing this in mind, how viable would it be as a form of storage? Because of the difficulty required for modification of data, my guess would be that it would be nonvolatile data storage. However, that opens it up to several other problems; how much would it take to keep the bacteria fed? And how would you prevent data loss/corruption from transposition, transformation, transduction, mutation, etc?

The team has successfully inserted into a common bacterium Albert Einstein’s Famous ‘E equals MC square’ equation

That is a relatively short DNA sequence, probably only 15 bases long, and thus would be very simple to make. However, what about strings of billions or trillions of bases that are required to store data in a way that would be able to rival tapes or mechanical hard drives these days? And for strings that long, once inserted into bacteria (never mind the viability of that option with current biological vectors), how would it be possible to ensure that gene transfer/mutation don't corrupt this data?

However, bacteria are much more durable than conventional forms of data storage, and are obviously resistant to magnets, interference, corrosion, etc.