How long will my PSU be good? 29 replies

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ConstanceJill

Huh yeah, whatever ^^

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6th December 2006

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#21 11 years ago

Just try, change your PSU only if you see that you're having problems.




EtherLaser

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23rd March 2007

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#22 11 years ago

It depends on how much current individually is going to 12v1 and 12v2. However chances are you won't be able to run 2 8800 GTS's as you stand now.

A PSU's 5v rail typically supplies the juice for the hard drives and optical drives so I wouldn't worry about that rail.

I don't think 580W will suffice for 2 8800GTS' as far as wattage goes. I could be wrong and if I am, then you'll have to look at how much current is being delivered individually to each 12v rail (1 and 2), and what components are powered by each.

I'd consult with the manufacturer of your PSU to find out what components are powered by the 12v rails.

Hope this helps

Sam




Kwould

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24th November 2003

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#23 11 years ago

I appreciate the help Sam. Just for reference, the 12V rails are 20A and 18A repectively. I know that the 6000+ is very demanding on the PSU (125W) and adding 2 high powered VGA's to that can't help.




EtherLaser

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#24 11 years ago

I've just looked on the SLI-certified section on SLIZone Home and unfortunately there are no certified 580W PSU's there. I'm guessing that despite the looks-to-be-satisfactory current (if 12v1 powers the CPU and PCI-E1, and 12v2 powers PCI-E2 and the motherboard etc.) the wattage simply isn't sufficient for the 2x8800GTS Set-up.

If you're looking for somit fairly reasonable yet still powerful and don't want to consider heaps of power (1Kw or there-abouts), then an Antec TruePower Trio 650W or a Seasonic M12-700 would do the job. They're both 100% stable under full load and can cope with Twin 8800 GTS cards, but the advantage of the M12-700 over the Trio is the modular cable design, as opposed to Antec's captive, unbraided cable design.

I hate to say this, but it looks like you're going to need a more powerful PSU...




Hellknight1993

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#25 11 years ago
n88tr;3682325Well this is my system I've compiled [but not put together just yet] Operating System: Windows XP Professional with SP2 Central Processing Unit: AMD FX-57 @ 2.8 ghz Motherboard: Asus A8V-E SE Via K8T890 Graphics Card: XFX GeForce 7950 GT Xtreme Memory: Corsair 2 gig DDR400 [2 512 mb modules, 1 1 gig module] Hard Drive: WD 110 gig, WD Caviar SE 250 gig, Seagate 300 gig SATA II Monitor: Viewsonic VP201b [native resolution 1600x1200] Soundcard: Audigy Soundblaster ZS2 Platinum PSU: ThermalTake 650 watt Internet Speed: Broadband So 650 is too much? It's not a big deal; I already ordered it and it will probably come today or tomorrow.

No. 650w with that PSU isnt too much dude, you could maybe go down a tad but wjhats the use , you have it now. Im picking its dual railed at least 18amps each ah!? Anyway I run one big HD, 2 Gig GeiL ultra, and one X1900XT 512 with a X2 4600 OC'ed to 2700 and I wouldnt want to go down anymore than my 520watt Dual railed PSU. But it handles it on full easy! 1000watts >>? Thats maybe overkill. Damn the power bill running that heater. But yeah, yours will be all good. ;)




Guest

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#26 11 years ago

I had to upgrade my Thermaltake 480W to a ToughPower 750W to run my HD 2900 XT. Mostly because my older 480W didn't have PCI-E connectors standard, and because it's insufficient. They say you can get away with a 450W PSU, but I wouldn't try it, the more wattage you have, the better. Anyways your PSU will only pump out as much as is required, it's not always coursing 1000W or whatnot at all times. A good quality PSU, with a high efficiency rating, and independent rails will save you a bundle in the long run. As for having a lower or higher wattage, always go higher if you can, in the case of PSU's, bigger is almost always better.




Hellknight1993

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#27 11 years ago
arcadeplayer987;3684672As the new hardware components use less and less power 1k PSU will never be a standard

Thats a damn good point. BUT, GPUs are using more and more. CPU's yes less. 1K's too much anyway. My 2cents.




EtherLaser

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#28 11 years ago

CPU's aren't using less and less power simply for the fact that more cores are being shoved into the package.

When the very inefficient P4's were out, the top-enders had a TDP of 130W and more, especially when you kicked up the clocks with overclocking. By contrast you'd think a Core 2 Duo is a saviour to that right? Almost, but only if you buy the E4xxx or E6xxx series which have 65W TDP's. However turn the notch up a gear to Core 2 Quad and we're back in 100W+ TDP territory which means we will be needing more powerful PSU's on the CPU side of things.

Motherboards provide the heart of the PC and since we're seeing more feature-packed boards for overclocking, and most of us do that, on that sides of things we'll be needing more powerful PSU's.

Graphics cards are a killer to PSU's. As our good friend B@SE has said GPU's are using more and more power (an 8800 GTX in a Core 2 X6800-PC with 2GB RAM, one hard disk kicks out 300W under load, a HD2900 XT kicks out at least 20% more). And that is before you start with SLI/Quad SLI and X/HD Crossfire setups. (An 8800 GTX SLI setup with an overclocked Core 2 QX6700/6800 can kick out a hell of a lot of a power).

To top that all off throw in the possibility of multiple hard drives, and any extra add-in cards such as a Creative X-Fi and other cards, and 1kW will soon start to become not a luxury but a necessity.




ConstanceJill

Huh yeah, whatever ^^

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#29 11 years ago

Multiple hard drives are not requiring really much power by themselves (unless you really have a big number, but hey, not everyone runs a high traffic server with RAID backup etc...). I had 3 SCSI drives + 1 IDE in a machine a while ago, everything went fine with a good old 250 Watts PSU ...




EtherLaser

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#30 11 years ago
ConstanceJill;3695165Multiple hard drives are not requiring really much power by themselves (unless you really have a big number, but hey, not everyone runs a high traffic server with RAID backup etc...). I had 3 SCSI drives + 1 IDE in a machine a while ago, everything went fine with a good old 250 Watts PSU ...

I was talking bout the key components in a pc, not just the hard drives. :p

Also, as has been stressed earlier in the thread, the other key factors in choosing a PSU to provide strong, stable power to your PC and in fact what I consider the most essential, are the rails on them, as in how many they are, the components each one provides power to, and the amount of current on them. This is important in keeping your system stable not only at stock speeds but also when overclocked. Also the stability comes into line with the ATX spec - too much current going through the rails to the components can damage them, too little and they become unstable and can still be damaged.

Another factor, but this one has more to do with cutting costs and reducing heat, is efficiency. Most PSU's are now part of the 80+ scheme (80% efficiency and higher) and some have an active PFC (Power Factor Correction) of 80% or above, which means less power is being wasted as heat.