How to Overclock a CPU? 91 replies

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yellowboy06

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#1 9 years ago

Can anyone tell me how to? Because I'm getting really pissed off on how I cant play GTA IV with good frames? Do you think I will be able to OC it too about 3.8GHz or hopefully 4GHz?

Or does anyone know of a very good site that gives you a good detailed guide on how? Or maybe you can help? :)

Thanks!




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#2 9 years ago

Unless you've got watercooling or a very good heatsink/fan combo I would stay away from OCing the CPU. You should try OCing the GPU instead, but I'm going to hit the rack right now, so you'll have to wait til somebody can tell you how.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



kow_ciller

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#3 9 years ago

research. Research and more research




yellowboy06

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#4 9 years ago

I know but, I need some basics? Or some good guides and someone to help me maybe? :(




Mastershroom VIP Member

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#5 9 years ago

Every setting you need to overclock is in your BIOS. The two main things you can adjust are the FSB (front side bus) and multiplier (if yours is unlocked). I would start with the FSB if I were you. Go in small increments (5-10MHz at a time), boot into Windows and run a stress test for half an hour or so, and monitor your temperatures. If it's stable and not too hot, go back into BIOS and nudge it up some more. Eventually you will hit a wall where you can't boot due to insufficient voltage. You can adjust your voltage to allow further overclocking, but like I say, you have to be very careful. Go small steps at a time and test for stability every time.




Mr. Pedantic

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#6 9 years ago

You start the computer During POST you press the Delete key to go into the BIOS. Find the place in the BIOS where you will be able to change the frequencies of your components. It should be in the manual too if you can't find it. Start ramping it up. After each 5-10MHz increment, save, then boot into windows and run some stress tests for about half an hour to an hour. Prime95 is a good utility to test the stability, run it on "Small FFTs" for half an hour or so, and then Blend for half an hour or so. Another useful tool to see whether your processor is going to overheat is CoreDamage. If you're using CoreDamage you might want to keep an eye on the temps with Realtemp. Keep going until Windows doesn't boot, the motherboard doesn't POST, it gets too hot with CoreDamage, or Prime95 fails. If you want to adjust voltages, do so, but if you don't, then back off the max stable clock you got by 5MHz to get your final clock. Then, test it for a long time with Prime95, probably 6 hours minimum, to make sure it's perfectly stable.

I know but, I need some basics? Or some good guides and someone to help me maybe?

The internet is your friend. May I ask why you haven't found any yet? Or are you just not looking?

Unless you've got watercooling or a very good heatsink/fan combo I would stay away from OCing the CPU. You should try OCing the GPU instead, but I'm going to hit the rack right now, so you'll have to wait til somebody can tell you how.

He has a perfectly good heatsink. We recommended it for him.




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#7 9 years ago

Google these essential tools, download them, and use them to aid with your overclocking:

CPU-Z: monitors many essential frequencies

Speedfan/Coretemp: Both used to monitor CPU temperatures while in windows. I'd say keep a max load temp of 60c, though I'd bet you could push it to 70c without frying anything right away.

Prime95: If your CPU can handle 1+ hour of each of the 3 tests, it's fit for bumping frequencies up a bit more.




AegenemmnoN VIP Member

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#8 9 years ago

Bottom right hand corner of the screen....Right click the time. Change.




Mr. Pedantic

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#9 9 years ago
Speedfan/Coretemp: Both used to monitor CPU temperatures while in windows. I'd say keep a max load temp of 60c, though I'd bet you could push it to 70c without frying anything right away.

I hate speedfan. There aren't many programs I absolutely hate, but this is one of them. Realtemp is much better.




*Daedalus

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#10 9 years ago

I would also add OCCT to that list. It's a benchmark program, but I've found Prime95 will still make the CPU run hotter. What's good about OCCT is that it will also monitor your temps (and is very similar to RealTemp in this regard), and produce graphs after a stress test. This is extremely useful in monitoring your vCore. If it's not an exactly straight line across the graph, your CPU won't be stable.

Zam and Pedantic have covered the basics nicely there. Just be careful of how your room temperature can change though. I recently fried a 280 by not paying attention to how hot it was getting. ;)