I'm cofused. Windows, Upgrade and Partitions. 9 replies

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Metall_pingwin

Call me Pingwin

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25th May 2005

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#1 11 years ago

So, as some of you may know - I've had some laptop issues recently. I got it back into working order today, preloaded with Windows Vista from Dell as it was supposed to.

The first thing I did, so as not to lose any information needlessly was install a copy of Windows 7. Since there was nothing to lose, I chose a clean install of the operating system and (though I did not realise at the time) chose to do it on the smaller, 15GB D:RECOVERY partition.

The installation informed me that it will keep a backup of the old operating system in windows.old just in case.

The installation went flawlessly, however during bootup I was given the option to chose between Windows Vista or Windows 7. I knew something had gone wrong at this point.

It turned out that I had not thought of the fact that installing the Windows 7 system on the D: parititon, I wasn't actually overwriting Vista. That had been on the C: drive all along. I'm not certain exactly what is on the RECOVERY partition, but I don't know that I appreciate it being gone.

Long story short. I now have a computer with two operating systems, Vista and 7, the latter being almost unusable on account of only 1.8GB free space.

I have a few ideas on what to do, but I want somebody to OK them before I mess up even worse accidentally. First, I could format and delete the C: partition, then extend and rename the D: partition to cover the entire hard drive. Alternately, I could somehow try to recover whatever the D: RECOVERY partition had on it (though I doubt it's possible, unless it's still there somehow), and this time simply do an Upgrade over Windows Vista on the C: partition.

I tried performing a Dell Factory Reset, however if done from the Vista menu in bios, it simply restarts the computer and Windows 7 claims no imeage can be found. I would assume this is exactly what was on the 15GB RECOVERY partition I installed Windows 7 on.

Anyway, I would appreciate and hints or suggestions on what the best course of action is from here.




Mastershroom Advanced Member

Frag Out!

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18th November 2004

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#2 11 years ago

That Recovery partition basically contained the files needed to restore factory settings in Vista on the other partition without using a Windows disk. I personally formatted over mine because I wanted that 15GB of space. =p

If I were you, I would just delete all the existing partitions and then create as many as you like. I just have one partition for my whole drive. Recovering the Recovery partition (lol) is pretty much out of the question unless you want to pay for some hardcore pro data recovery, and it's not really worth it.




Metall_pingwin

Call me Pingwin

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25th May 2005

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#3 11 years ago

I totally don't give a shit about recovery functions, I can do all that myself. The only problem with deleting everything is that 1) My copy of Windows 7 didn't come on a CD or .iso form. Rather than that, it's a regular ol' file that has to be unpacked and the installation executed. Perhaps there is a way to turn it into a bootable disc, but I do not know it. And 2) My Vista installation CD was jacked by the people at Dell when I sent them my computer. I asked for it back, but it's going to be a while until it gets here I bet.

The point is, I don't have a Vista installation CD, and my Windows 7 installation requires an actual operating system to execute it.




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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23rd November 2002

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#4 11 years ago

I would recommend backing up your partitions, or at least the Windows 7 partition.

You may be able to reinstall from inside Vista, installing on the C:\ drive. Which should be the simple option.

It is risky to change the size of a partition, and not recommended. Also, there could be some unexpected side affects of not having a C:\ drive, so you may want to create a new one, that is a gig or two.

It is possible to delete the Vista partition, and resize the D:\ drive. But if it does not work, then you will be stuck with an unusable pc, until you get a new reinstallation CD.

You might could try resizing the Vista partition first (not deleting), then seeing if it will boot. Then resizing your Windows 7 partition.




*Daedalus

A Phoenix from the ashes

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18th April 2006

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#5 11 years ago

I'd say just boot into 7, delete the Vista partition, and then expand the 7 partition into the free space. The only thing that might cause a problem is that recovery partitions tend to have weird characteristics. Having said that, the 7 installer probably took care of that for you, as it would have wiped whatever settings were there.

Long story short: Boot into D:, delete C:, expand D:. =p




MrFancypants Forum Administrator

The Bad

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7th December 2003

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#6 11 years ago

The easiest thing is probably to start over - format everything, create two partitions, one for your system and one for programs, then install Win7. That way you will certinaly have a clean install and your OS will be on the C partition, which is usually better.

You'll need a bootable installation CD or a bootdisk with driver support though.




*Daedalus

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#7 11 years ago

If he does what I suggested, he can juse rename the D: partition afterwards anyway.




Kilobyte

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23rd November 2002

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#8 11 years ago

Renaming the primary partition can produce unexpected results. Although it does not usually affect a clean install.

If he is going to rename the D:\ partition, then he should do so as soon as possible.




Zach

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5th July 2005

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#9 11 years ago

MrFancypants;5171632The easiest thing is probably to start over - format everything, create two partitions, one for your system and one for programs, then install Win7. That way you will certinaly have a clean install and your OS will be on the C partition, which is usually better.

You'll need a bootable installation CD or a bootdisk with driver support though.

Essentially what I did with my system.

Also, so you don't have to burn anything: Creating Bootable Vista / Windows 7 USB Flash Drive at Kevin’s Blog




Guest

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#10 9 years ago

I don't understand you have a WIn 7 why have a Vista together? All things Vista have and it can do, Win 7 does. Just curious,