Intel Creates a 80-Core Processor 22 replies

Please wait...

Reno

The professional.

50 XP

22nd March 2006

0 Uploads

1,312 Posts

0 Threads

#1 11 years ago
Following their march from standard processors to dual-core and quad-core designs in 2006, Intel researchers have built an 80-core chip that performs more than a teraflop of operations (trillions of floating point operations per second) while using less electricity than a modern desktop PC chip. First described by Intel executives at a September trade show, the chip fits 80 cores onto a 275-square millimeter, fingernail-size chip and draws only 62 watts of power--less than many modern desktop chips.

source

Intel is really making a comeback. I never thought i would see them stomp AMD this hard.




War Hawk

۞ www.thisisnotporn.com ۞

50 XP

27th January 2004

0 Uploads

8,749 Posts

0 Threads

#2 11 years ago

Interesting article. It says that using more than 16 cores returned worse and worse results. I wonder when I can buy myself a 16 core processor ;)




Mr. Matt VIP Member

#BanRadioActiveLobster

356,406 XP

17th June 2002

7 Uploads

33,654 Posts

779 Threads

#3 11 years ago

Bob L. Scrachy;3530323source

Intel is really making a comeback. I never thought i would see them stomp AMD this hard.

It's not much of a 'stomp' given that such a thing won't be sold to consumers for years to come, if ever.




Reno

The professional.

50 XP

22nd March 2006

0 Uploads

1,312 Posts

0 Threads

#4 11 years ago
War Hawk;3530343Interesting article. It says that using more than 16 cores returned worse and worse results. I wonder when I can buy myself a 16 core processor ;)

In the next paragraph it said how they solved the problem. ;)

To solve the problem on the new chip, they used a hardware-based thread scheduler and faster on-chip memory caches, optimizing the way data flows from memory into each core. To improve the design, Intel researchers plan to add a layer of "3D stacked memory" under the chip to minimize the time and power required to feed the cores with data. Next, they will create a mega-chip that uses general purpose cores instead of the floating-point units used in the current design.



Bs|Archaon

I would die without GF

50 XP

15th March 2006

0 Uploads

5,910 Posts

0 Threads

#5 11 years ago
War Hawk;3530343Interesting article. It says that using more than 16 cores returned worse and worse results. I wonder when I can buy myself a 16 core processor ;)

You could use 4 quad core Xeons. :p




Roaming East

Ultima ratio regum

50 XP

7th November 2005

0 Uploads

4,770 Posts

0 Threads

#6 11 years ago

Im still an AMD whore through and through though




Disconnecting

Gone

50 XP

23rd March 2004

0 Uploads

745 Posts

0 Threads

#7 11 years ago

Mr. Matt;3530352It's not much of a 'stomp' given that such a thing won't be sold to consumers for years to come, if ever.[/quote]

[quote=guru3d]X2 5200+ old pirce = $295 new price = $222

http://www.guru3d.com/news.html#4958




rob.

I am the Walrus

50 XP

24th October 2004

0 Uploads

5,580 Posts

0 Threads

#8 11 years ago

X2 5200+ is dual core, not 80-core....

I don't see how Intel are making a comeback when A) The Conroe was their comeback, and it worked a treat. B) An 80-core CPU is for scientific and testing purposes only. As Matt said, there won't be one on the market for a long time, if ever.

What the hell is going to utilise 80-cores?




marvinmatthew

Tech is where you'll find me..

50 XP

13th April 2005

0 Uploads

3,627 Posts

0 Threads

#9 11 years ago

Robâ„¢;3530477What the hell is going to utilise 80-cores?[/quote]

[quote=BillGates]No one will ever need more than 640K of memory for a personal computer.

I bet that in ten years that consumer level PC's will have 80+ cores.




Sheepeep VIP Member

weirdal = new ptaq()

31,600 XP

2nd September 2003

0 Uploads

2,948 Posts

0 Threads

#10 11 years ago

Wow, PC World is even further behind in the news than I thought. Even Slashdot covered this one months ago ;)

Other news sources suggest Intel are planning 80 cores for 2011. That essentially gives them up to five years (beginning of this year->End of '11) plus whatever delays they want to add to that. Realistically though, it looks to me that the IT market is going a different way to Intel.

We're starting to use our graphics cards for processing some numbers because...It's just faster, considerably so. I would expect to see the idea of a maths co-processor rekindle in the home market.

The space freed by not having so much floating-point operation mathematics and whatever other buzzword you want to add, will likely go towards virtualisation technology. This seems to be the emerging fad in IT, the clock speed has been essentially maxed out, the amount of cores has been maxed out, so we may see some chips with much larger caches instead.

Well, maybe. We can hope, right? ;)