Intel wants to charge you for "DLC" 20 replies

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DarkKrucifix7

Geek on the Internets

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26th February 2007

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#1 8 years ago
Hold onto your hyperthreaded horses, because this is liable to whip up an angry mob -- Intel's asking customers to pay extra if they want the full power of their store-bought silicon. An eagle-eyed Engadget reader was surfing the Best Buy shelves when he noticed this $50 card -- and sure enough, Intel websites confirm -- that lets you download software to unlock extra threads and cache on the new Pentium G6951 processor. Hardware.info got their hands on an early sample of the chip and discovered it's actually a full 1MB of L3 cache that's enabled plus HyperThreading support, which translates to a modest but noticeable upgrade.

Intel wants to charge $50 to unlock stuff your CPU can already do -- Engadget

I'm not certain how to react to this...part of me is laughing, the other is raging.




*The.Doctor

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25th November 2003

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#2 8 years ago

We already pay more for HyperThreading (i5 vs i7 anyone?). I'm not sure how this downloaded software would work though, wouldn't the cache and HT be handled by the BIOS before windows even loads?

Edit: Looking at the article again and the pictures it looks like this may just for a few select prebuild companies (like Gateway in the picture), it sounds like it might just be a BIOS update that turns on those features. I don't see this working at all, as soon as that new BIOS hits the web everyone is just going to download it for free.




*Daedalus

A Phoenix from the ashes

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18th April 2006

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#3 8 years ago

I'm assuming the software you downloaded flashes something or other somewhere to keep it unlocked... it wouldn't make sense for the downloaded software to handle hyperthreading; that'd just screw over your performance increase.




Kilobyte

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23rd November 2002

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#4 8 years ago

It appears to be a BIOS flash, for specific motherboards.

My question is as to whether or not swapping motherboards will unlock the processor, or if it requires a "DRM" enabled motherboard.




Goody. VIP Member

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26th July 2005

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#5 8 years ago

System builder that employ this tactic will lose money in the long run as people will go else were. Waiting for the AMD Bulldozer




Jeff Über Admin

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#6 8 years ago

you know.. normally I wouldn't condone cracking something, but I have this little 'thing' about not being able to use what I paid for. It's there, but I have to pay MORE to be entitled to it? Sorry Intel, I'm siding with the hackers on this decision.


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#7 8 years ago

Intel's asking customers to pay extra if they want the full power of their store-bought silicon. An eagle-eyed Engadget reader was surfing the Best Buy shelves when he noticed this $50 card -- and sure enough, Intel websites confirm -- that lets you download software to unlock extra threads and cache on the new Pentium G6951 processor.

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Sgt. D. Pilla

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#8 8 years ago
you know.. normally I wouldn't condone cracking something, but I have this little 'thing' about not being able to use what I paid for. It's there, but I have to pay MORE to be entitled to it? Sorry Intel, I'm siding with the hackers on this decision.

You end up paying the same.

Example... Without "Software Lock": $1100 - All Features ready to go "Out of the box" With "Software Lock": $1000 - Features most people don't use, locked, can be 'upgraded' if required.

For those that want HT or an unlocked Multi, they simply pay more 'down the track' rather than right away.

Pay Less Up Front Pay More Later, should you want the locked features.

It's an easy no brainer way for them to cut costs, to provide computers to people at a cheaper price point, while remaining technologically competitive.

I'm with Intel on this one, it's a great idea with lots of potential. And if they do it how most expect them to, lock the hardware on their servers with corresponding serial numbers, it would be near impossible to crack. Similar to house a number of mobile phones can't be 'unlocked' without going to the provider.




Mr. Pedantic

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8th October 2006

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#9 8 years ago

Given that this seems to be just a method of Intel making more money, I have no idea why they would go with what you posted and simply drop prices across the board so that adding the features would be the same price as what it would have been.




Schofield VIP Member

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24th October 2007

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#10 8 years ago

I'm not into the technical stuff, but this seems extremely stupid. If I pay for something, I want that to include everything that they've made for it, I don't want them "putting aside" certain features that they've already made, charging us for updates or drivers is horrible.