Laptop Temperatures 6 replies

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#1 6 years ago

I'm going to be putting a lot of stress on my "new" laptop over the next few days/weeks doing some video editing. What I found a bit disturbing was that when running renders, the CPU gets to 80-83C. I tried to cut off some heat by removing the battery and putting a 120 mm fan under the laptop, but that only shaved about 1-3C off the temperature. Within about 30 seconds of stopping a render (I.E. no longer stressing the CPU), the CPU drops to about 50C, and idles between 40 and 50C. The reverse goes when putting stress on the CPU - stress it and it almost immediately jumps 30C.

Are those kinds of temps normal? I'm tempted to take the thing apart to clean and re-paste the heatsink, but I don't want to do it just to find the same temps, especially if 80C is perfectly normal. So my question is, will I be fine running these temps indefinitely? If not, any suggestions on cooling it a bit more, aside from putting it in a freezer? :lulz:

Edit: It's a Toshiba Satellite A505-S6005. I3 CPU, 4 GB DDR3, integrated GPU, etc.




Caprica-Six

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#2 6 years ago

Anchovy Casserole;5623317I'm going to be putting a lot of stress on my "new" laptop over the next few days/weeks doing some video editing. What I found a bit disturbing was that when running renders, the CPU gets to 80-83C. I tried to cut off some heat by removing the battery and putting a 120 mm fan under the laptop, but that only shaved about 1-3C off the temperature. Within about 30 seconds of stopping a render (I.E. no longer stressing the CPU), the CPU drops to about 50C, and idles between 40 and 50C. The reverse goes when putting stress on the CPU - stress it and it almost immediately jumps 30C.

Are those kinds of temps normal? I'm tempted to take the thing apart to clean and re-paste the heatsink, but I don't want to do it just to find the same temps, especially if 80C is perfectly normal. So my question is, will I be fine running these temps indefinitely? If not, any suggestions on cooling it a bit more, aside from putting it in a freezer? :lulz:

Edit: It's a Toshiba Satellite A505-S6005. I3 CPU, 4 GB DDR3, integrated GPU, etc.

Its almost the same as my laptop (urs little newer i think mine is 5 years old) Just took windows off it because its running too hot, as in the underneath of it is properly hot to the touch and can hear the fan going mental.....




Caprica-Six

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#3 6 years ago
D3matt

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#4 6 years ago

They make some pretty powerful laptop cooling pads, some run off USB, some have their own power adapters. I would say 80C is definitely not normal for any processor (Video cards being a different story), laptop or not. As always, first things first. Try dusting it out. Then try a cooling pad (doubt your 120mm fan is doing much because there's really nothing to exchange heat with or create pressure there). If you're still getting temperatures like that, you may have to look for... alternative means. Personally I'd just use a desktop, but I understand if that's not an option.

I hate having my processor anywhere above 60C. I'm not familiar with intel cores, but 80C is definitely higher than you want to run for any length of time, imo.

(Not really sure about Thermapak, but the images for their test results on "comparison" are both broken, and they horribly butchered the word temperature in BOTH images on the testing page. Not exactly the mark of a reliable company.)




kow_ciller

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#5 6 years ago

Sounds about right for a laptop.

A cooling pad with a fan should bring temps down by a nice amount.




Mastershroom VIP Member

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#6 6 years ago

Those are nothing unsafe for a laptop CPU under load.




Guest

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#7 6 years ago

Thanks for the responses. FTR, this is the way I've got the fan set up:

Spoiler: Show
190161-anchovy-casserole-albums-awesomeness-picture9687-laptop-cooling.jpg

There's about 1/2" under the fan, and 1" above the fan, so the underside of the laptop is getting plenty of air. It seems to be cooling the underside of the case, as it's pretty cool to the touch when the fan's on. However, I wouldn't be entirely surprised if it wasn't doing much to help cool things down, as plastic is a poor conductor, and the fan probably isn't feeding a whole lot of air into the vents...

I'm a bit skeptical about these cooling pads though. If all they are doing is distributing heat from the case, that's really already being done. I would also think they would hinder airflow going into the computer, causing internal temperatures to rise. Am I wrong somehow?

If temps are fine, I may just try to clean the vents and leave it be. I'd like to have this laptop last four to five years if possible. I'd do the video editing somewhere else, but the laptop is currently (believe it or not) the fastest computer in the house, and will likely stay that way for a while.

Edit:

My dad convinced me to re-paste the heatsink - took the motherboard out, cleaned, re-pasted, and re-seated the heatsink, put it all back together, turned the laptop on. No fan. I'd forgotten to plug it back in. :facepalm:

Rebuilt the laptop again, and now the fan is on, and now it's peaking at about 71C. Surprisingly, there was barely any dust built up in or around the heatsink. Prior owner must have taken decent care of this thing.

Not really sure how I could lower the temperature further. I suppose there's the possibility of forcing more air through the heat sink, but I suspect that that would be fruitless unless I could somehow increase the rate of heat transfer from the CPU to the heat sink. It's a shame that they use such a dinky little bar of copper to do the job. On top of that, the screws holding the heat sink to the CPU don't actually clamp the heat sink down - springs do. I'm sure the engineers had the fact the fact that the laptop would be jostled around a lot in mind when choosing that design.

I'm sorry, I'm going on an on, aren't I?