LCD - 720p skips to 1080p? 2 replies

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MoonJelly

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21st January 2005

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#1 10 years ago

I've noticed for LCD HDTV's they only have 720p native, and 1080p native. How come they didn't make 1080i native? I know the LCD's are listed as 720p, and they can upconvert to 1080i, but why not just make it 1080i native?

My cousin has a Sony 30" FD Trinitron WEGA Widescreen 1080i native HDTV, which is tube television. We watched Shooter on blu-ray and right away I saw that this 1080i tube television produces an AMAZING picture, just like the Sony 720p native (1080i upconvert) BRAVIA which is $1500 (I wanted to say the tube had better picture, but I've never seen the 2 tv's side by side).

Anyone understand this? And if I am way off on this info, thats my fault because I didn't research this first. Thanks everyone.




Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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23rd November 2002

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#2 10 years ago

480, 730, and 1080. Those numbers refer to the number of pixels from top to bottom.

You know how some monitors support 640x480, and some support 1024x768, or 1280x960, etc... None of those support either 1080i, or 1080p. You have to go all the way to 1600x1200, for 1080i/p support. More pixels, means more expensive.

The "i" stands for Interlaced, and the "p" stands for Progressive. Interlaced only refreshes every other line, which means the image will not be as smooth. The Progressive TVs refresh every line, every time. This makes for a smoother image, especially for sports games, or anything with a lot of motion.The tube probably had a sharper picture, being able to show at a higher resolution, with more pixels.

These days, if they are going to include 1080 pixels in the TV, they might as well make it a full 1080p.

The pixels are going to be more expensive than the "progressive scan" capabilities, if the TV already supports "720p". So 1080i is not really in between them, but an old and outdated predecessor to 1080p.




MoonJelly

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#3 10 years ago

Monster_user;4218010480, 730, and 1080. Those numbers refer to the number of pixels from top to bottom.

You know how some monitors support 640x480, and some support 1024x768, or 1280x960, etc... None of those support either 1080i, or 1080p. You have to go all the way to 1600x1200, for 1080i/p support. More pixels, means more expensive.

The "i" stands for Interlaced, and the "p" stands for Progressive. Interlaced only refreshes every other line, which means the image will not be as smooth. The Progressive TVs refresh every line, every time. This makes for a smoother image, especially for sports games, or anything with a lot of motion.The tube probably had a sharper picture, being able to show at a higher resolution, with more pixels.

These days, if they are going to include 1080 pixels in the TV, they might as well make it a full 1080p.

The pixels are going to be more expensive than the "progressive scan" capabilities, if the TV already supports "720p". So 1080i is not really in between them, but an old and outdated predecessor to 1080p.

Well put. Thats pretty clear there. Thanks dude.