Linux? 29 replies

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Von II

aka noobst3R

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16th June 2008

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#1 10 years ago

What the hell is linux? I've been reading wikipedia and The Linux Home Page at Linux Online , but i can't find a version that suitable for me.

it looks like that there are one thousand versions of linux. So if you could suggest some for me... I'm looking for a version that is quite small and can be used as a second OS. I payed alot for my vista and i'm not going to remove this vista shit from my pc:D. And what would be the best way to run it? using a liveCD or install on my HDD?

thanks:) (and i have 160gb of free space, so it doesn't need to be very very small:p)




kow_ciller

Gettin' hardware chilly

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16th June 2004

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#2 10 years ago

I would say get Ubuntu and throw another hard drive onto your comp. You could also use a utility and resize your partitions but I wouldn't want to risk my data by doing that. If you have no experience in linux at all I would suggest to get a livecd and play with that for a few days to get used to the feel and how linux works in case you decide to change your mind.




Von II

aka noobst3R

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16th June 2008

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#3 10 years ago

Yeah, i think i try it first. and btw, another HDD is not an option, cuz i'm using my laptop for Linux. (i can replace the HDD, but that would be kinda stupid)




CC_machine

(my ownage) = (your ownage) ^2

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13th December 2005

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#4 10 years ago

i recommend Ubuntu too, as it's probably does the best job at auto-configuring and installing proprietary codecs, drivers etc. A second hard drive is a good idea but try resizing Vista using Vista's own partitioner (defrag your disk for a few hours first first and then try: How to resize a partition in Windows Vista | Vista Rewired )

If that doesnt work well (often to me it showed only a few GB could be shaved off where there was 100+GB free after many hous of defrag) you could try a partitioner such as the one on the Ubuntu Live CD or something professional such as Partition Magic as that will be 100% gauranteed safe whereas the Linux crowd have to basically reverse-engineer ugly closed-source things like NTFS to get them to work on Linux at all, which isn't always the best way but it has to be done.

Sorry if I went off on a tangent there, but burn Ubuntu to a CD (using Infra Recorder if you lack software to burn an ISO to a CD on your Windows PC right now - google it), put it in your PC and reboot. Choose "Try Ubuntu without doing anything to your computer" or similiar option, as this won't touch your HDD at all until you click an "Install" icon. Bear in mind that running off a CD is a lot slower than a proper install to disk as the CD is technically capable of less data transfer and has to spin up to find things, etc.

one more thing: if you get stuck on how to do something, google !! oh and search or post on ubuntuforums.org too.




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3rd May 2005

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#5 10 years ago

When setting up a dual-boot system on a machine with a single hard drive (such as a laptop), you would normally first back up your data and then format the hard drive. If you intend to dual-boot Windows instead of two different versions of Linux, you should reinstall Windows first (otherwise it'll bitch at you later on, complaining that Linux has overwritten the MBR, and you'll end up having to reformat again, destroying BOTH operating systems in the process), but only allocate half the available drive space to it - so for a 100gb drive, you'd only give Windows about 50gb. Once that's done, the Linux installer can be set to allocate the remaining free space to the second operating system.

From that point on, once the installation finishes, GRUB (or sometimes LILO, depending on which version of Linux you use) will ask you which OS you want to use every time you boot the computer. The default is usually Linux, but you can change it to Windows if you don't use it that often.

You could avoid reformatting entirely by resizing your Windows partition and installing Linux in the space freed up, but as said, this is a risky process, and could end in tears. If you're uncertain, as someone said in another thread, you could try Ubuntu Linux using the Wubi installer. This allows Ubuntu to reside within your Windows filesystem, which eliminates the problem of messing around with partitions. There are caveats to this method though. Generally speaking a seperate partition is a much cleaner solution, albeit a more complicated one.




The Fat Controller

the renegade codpiece emulator

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7th September 2006

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#6 10 years ago

Noobst3R;4754835What the hell is linux? I've been reading wikipedia and The Linux Home Page at Linux Online , but i can't find a version that suitable for me.

it looks like that there are one thousand versions of linux. So if you could suggest some for me... I'm looking for a version that is quite small and can be used as a second OS. I payed alot for my vista and i'm not going to remove this vista shit from my pc:D. And what would be the best way to run it? using a liveCD or install on my HDD?

thanks:) (and i have 160gb of free space, so it doesn't need to be very very small:p)

Like others have said, repartitioning your drive is the best way to go if you want to use Linux as a second OS. You might also look for some tutorials for installing Linux on a pen-drive if you have a reasonably sized one spare.

I recommend you download some LiveCDs for various Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva etc, and decide what suits you best. Try this survey if you like, it'll suggest some distributions to you:

zegenie Studios Linux Distribution Chooser

Kind of related: andLinux.org -- Run Linux natively inside Windows - this might be of interest to you as well, it lets you run Linux natively at the same time as Windows. Easy to set up and use too, though it can be a bit buggy, and not all Linux applications will work.




emonkies

I'm too cool to Post

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17th July 2003

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#7 10 years ago

Last version I ran of Linux was Ubuntu 8.04 and I had all drivers and software I wanted installed and running in a few hours.

Ubuntu would do everything I wanted including music, anime, and movies, but could not get WoW to run properly even with the then current version of WINE.

If it werent for PC gaming I would probably be happy with Linux.




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#8 10 years ago
Anlushac11;4755036Ubuntu would do everything I wanted including music, anime, and movies, but could not get WoW to run properly even with the then current version of WINE.

I had this problem as well. For future reference, to get WoW to work properly using WINE, open Config.wtf and append the following line using a text editor: SET gxApi "opengl" This is necessary because the game has issues with Wine's implementation of DirectX. Much better to run it in OpenGL mode instead, in that way the graphics themselves are being rendered natively by Linux's OpenGL subsystem. Once that's done, the game runs beautifully, and as smoothly as it does under Windows.




*The.Doctor

Trust me, I'm a Doctor

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25th November 2003

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#9 10 years ago

I would recommend Kubuntu if you want a more windows-like GUI. KDE is a lot closer to Windows than Gnome (Ubuntu) is.




Von II

aka noobst3R

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16th June 2008

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#10 10 years ago

thx for all the comments :). I have 2 hard drives, a smaal one with win on it and some shit like NERO and stuff, and a second 160gb HDD filled with 5gb of music. So repartition my HDD is not worth the effort:). And, like CC_machine said: a Live CD is slower. I'm just going to try to install Ubuntu on my second HDD. Wish me luck not screwing up my computer:P.