Linux for nOObs 61 replies

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Johnny Mullet

Hi-Tech Redneck

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7th March 2005

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#1 13 years ago

OK! Here is the deal! I have been hearing alot about Linux and want to use it as my OS on my Dell when I wipe the drive (way overdue!) and I need info!

1) Is Linux a free OS and can I download it and save it on a disc to install on a fresh reformat?

2) What version of Linux should I get since I am a daily user of my PC and I am also a gamer. (there is Suse, and a bunch of others that are confusing me!)

3) After my reformat of my PC (Dell Dimension 2350) do I just pop in the CD that I put Linux on and it goes from there?

4) Will I need Windows for any reason at all? I really only want one OS since I have no idea what partitioning my hard-drive is all about.

5) Windows XP is pretty user friendly when installing hardware (Modem, Printer, Sound card, etc) is Linux the same way?

6) After my reformat and installing Linux (if you help me on steps 1-3) will it recognize my FX5200 video card, Creative Soundblaster soundcard, Conexant 56K modem, etc, or is there going to be issues with all this?

I am pretty educated in Microsoft XP, but I have no clue what Linux is all about! Please reply in a "nooB friendly" manner since this is all new to me!




AegenemmnoN VIP Member

The cream of the crop

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19th August 2003

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#2 13 years ago

Well i cant really help you too much since i have only used Linux for about 3 hours in total.

i do have some resources though,

http://www.linuxiso.org/ loads of different linuxes.

http://www.alcohol-soft.com/ so you can burn the CD image onto a CD (youll need 5 CDs for the latest SUSE)

yeah, so that all i can really contribute.




x-Mandalore-x

Release the warrior spirit

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19th June 2005

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#3 13 years ago

[COLOR=red]Well, im told "Redhat linux professional 9.0" is the best of them, all, not sure about that tho:p :smokin: [/COLOR] x-M-x




C38368

...burning angel wings to dust

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14th February 2004

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#4 13 years ago

1) By license, Linux must be made freely available. ISO downloads of all the major distros can be found at www.linuxiso.org as Aeg said. You can also buy boxed retail versions of a few distros, which essentially buys you a period of professional support.

2) I started with Red Hat, but they've since made a shift to targetting the enterprise market only. If you'd like to buy a boxed distro, I highly recomment SuSE. If you'd like to just download, I highly recommend SuSE. Purists will scoff at me for suggesting that, but SuSE/Novell has been pushing hard to make inroads with non-geek segments, and as such have developed quite a polished product. SuSE is also RPM-based, which makes installing new packages much easier for the novice. Red Hat and Mandrake are the other two major RPM distros (RPM, for your edification, is short for Redhat Package Management and are probably the closest thing to a .exe you'll find in Linux).

3) Pretty much, for the simpler installations at any rate. Some are more complex by design, some can be made more complex (I understand that it can take hours to properly set up a Gentoo installation if you're compiling from scratch--nevermind the compile time).

4) Possibly, but there are precious few things that Windows still does better than Linux. There're a handful of professional apps and a not insignificant number of games that either have better alternatives in Windows, or simply do not port to Linux yet, respectively. But by and large, you can completely replace a Windows box with Linux (though you'll have to spend a little extra cash to do so).

5) Linux is pretty good about most drivers and such. But if you have a piece of hardware that Linux doesn't recognise, then you'll more than likely find yourself at the command line trying to fix it. Some things aren't straightforward, either (for example, my Epson CX5200 isn't supported under Linux by default. To get it to work, I have to install drivers for Epson's C84 print engine, which the CX5200 uses. Not exactly obvious).

6) Yes, yes, NO. Graphics cards are readily recognised in Linux, but you'll still want to install a driver. nVIDIA produces an excellent Linux driver. Your soundcard will at least work, and produce multichannel sound where necessary I believe, but you may not get all the fancy extras. I emphatically say no about your modem in particular: Conextant uses a proprietary chipset that Linux cannot recognise without help. A company called Linuxant produces a driver that'll get your modem up and running. A free (14.4k-limited) version can be found for download from this page. You can also buy a lifetime license for $15 that enabled full 56k functionality. No, that's not a sales pitch; I bought a license back in college. There may be other issues you'll encounter, too, but very few pieces of hardware are flat-out incompatible, and most can be made to work.

Hope that helped a little.




Agentlaidlaw

Pie

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21st February 2005

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#5 13 years ago

If your gonna try Linux for the first time then Suse is good because well it just works. Just with Suse you will have to download and install the WMA,WMV,MOV, and so on codecs by going here http://packman.links2linux.de/ and downloading the win32 codecs and mplayer.

Any Linux distro can reformat your HD for you, no need to use Windows to do that.

The best video cards for Linux is Nvidia cards since Nvidia fully supports Linux and makes kick ass drivers for Linux. Suse comes with the real Nvidia drivers but you can only get them with online-update.

Your 56k modem well :/ a lot of 56k are winfast ones and still have trouble on Linux. But Suse may be able to get it to work if you configure it with yast :/




Lysdestic VIP Member

Dr. Professor Logic, PhD.

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11th November 2003

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#6 13 years ago
Mullet ManOK! Here is the deal! I have been hearing alot about Linux and want to use it as my OS on my Dell when I wipe the drive (way overdue!) and I need info!

Good man.

1) Is Linux a free OS and can I download it and save it on a disc to install on a fresh reformat?

Linux Is free, And yes You can download it at many Places, http://www.linuxiso.org/ being the most popular, as AeG listed. Allow me to reccomend SuSE 10 Here- http://www.novell.com/products/suselinux/downloads/ftp/mirrors_isos.html

Look for a server near you that has the Eval version. DVD or CD's is up to you.

I advise using FileZilla for the download in windows. http://filezilla.sourceforge.net/

2) What version of Linux should I get since I am a daily user of my PC and I am also a gamer. (there is Suse, and a bunch of others that are confusing me!)

I recommend SuSE 10. Fair Balance Of Noob Friendlyness, but It is still capable of advanced tings when you grow into your own.

3) After my reformat of my PC (Dell Dimension 2350) do I just pop in the CD that I put Linux on and it goes from there?

You don't even need to reformat, Just pop it in, and reboot, If however you want to reformat, It can do that for you, Remember To Defrag Windows if you decide to dual booth though.

4) Will I need Windows for any reason at all? I really only want one OS since I have no idea what partitioning my hard-drive is all about.

Partiotioning is easy, Simply Defrag Windows, And Pop in your linux CD, It will ask you if you would like to do a complete format, or dual-boot system. Although, With CeDega, I doubt You would need To dual boot.

5) Windows XP is pretty user friendly when installing hardware (Modem, Printer, Sound card, etc) is Linux the same way?

Mostly, Check the Distro site (whichever you pick *cough*suse for a Hardwar compatibility list to be sure. http://hardwaredb.suse.de/index.php?LANG=en_UK for SuSE

6) After my reformat and installing Linux (if you help me on steps 1-3) will it recognize my FX5200 video card, Creative Soundblaster soundcard, Conexant 56K modem, etc, or is there going to be issues with all this?

Conexant, Has Linux Drivers, So does NVidia, I will even be willing to compile a simple install thing that you only need to double click on if you get suse for the nVidia drivers. I am almost positive Creatives Soundblaster will work.

I am pretty educated in Microsoft XP, but I have no clue what Linux is all about! Please reply in a "nooB friendly" manner since this is all new to me!

:) Hope this helps you. Feel absolutley Free to grab me on any chat client for more help. :nodding:




Agentlaidlaw

Pie

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21st February 2005

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#7 13 years ago

Also a good site to find a good distro is at http://www.distrowathc.com/

linuxiso.org is out of date with some of its distros :/




Lysdestic VIP Member

Dr. Professor Logic, PhD.

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11th November 2003

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#8 13 years ago

AgentlaidlawAlso a good site to find a good distro is at http://www.distrowathc.com/

linuxiso.org is out of date with some of its distros :/

http://www.distrowatch.com

You typoed! :p

Yeah, Linuxiso is a bit out, it is why I linked to SuSe directly.




Revenge VIP Member

Shizzle my nizzle

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28th July 2004

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#9 13 years ago

Well, C38368 has owned us all as usual, so I'll just elaborate on Q3.

Q: After my reformat of my PC (Dell Dimension 2350) do I just pop in the CD that I put Linux on and it goes from there?

A: Should do. If your computer says it can't find anything to boot from, then restart your computer and open up the BIOS. Find a way to change the boot sequence (usually 'General BIOS Settings' or similar), then make sure that your CD drive is first. For example, one of the options might be D, C, A - this would boot from D:\ (assuming this is the CD drive), then C:\ (assuming this is the primary hard drive) and then A:\ (floppy).

After that, save the BIOS settings and reboot with the CD in the drive, and you'll be presented with the initial installation screen.

Some distrobutions allow you to download a Live version, which is simply a CD you boot from where you can see if you like the OS before installing. Best to download and burn a Live version to see if it's worth downloading the real thing and giving it a partition of its own.




Rookie VIP Member

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3rd May 2005

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#10 13 years ago

Reposted from Devious Tyrant.

I use SuSE 10.0, Red Hat 9.1 and Knoppix.

Mullet ManOK! Here is the deal! I have been hearing alot about Linux and want to use it as my OS on my Dell when I wipe the drive (way overdue!) and I need info!

1) Is Linux a free OS and can I download it and save it on a disc to install on a fresh reformat?[/QUOTE] Yes. Linux is completely free to download. (Although, depending on what distro you get, it can be anything up to 7gb - so you may have a mother of a wait for it to download!) Alternatively, for a small fee you can have it mailed to you on a CD or DVD.

Mullet Man2) What version of Linux should I get since I am a daily user of my PC and I am also a gamer. (there is Suse, and a bunch of others that are confusing me!)[/QUOTE] There are hundreds of distributions of Linux available - a good place to find out more info on each of them is www.distrowatch.com. The most n00b friendly version is SuSE, in my opinion. It's easy to set up and work with, and installing software is a cinch with YaST. However you may have some problems with drivers, but a quick Google for Linux drivers for your problematic hardware should solve that problem - unless it's a stubborn son of a bitch. (Like my modem)

As for gaming, you can run Windows games on Linux with the use of CeDega - a program that lets you run many Windows applications on a Linux system. Right now it supports around 95% of all games designed for Windows. (And yes, ETF is one of them. ;))

You can get CeDega at www.transgaming.com

Mullet Man3) After my reformat of my PC (Dell Dimension 2350) do I just pop in the CD that I put Linux on and it goes from there? :sarcasm:[/QUOTE] Yep. Just format, pop in the CD/DVD and, as long as your motherboard supports booting from optical drives, you should have no problems installing.

Mullet Man4) Will I need Windows for any reason at all? I really only want one OS since I have no idea what partitioning my hard-drive is all about.

If you aren't that experienced with Linux, then I would recommend partitioning your drive and keeping XP as a backup - Wait, wait, hear me out. Partitioning is extremely simple. In your case, you would just format, insert the XP disc, and when it asks you about partitioning the drive in Setup, tell it to use only half of the drive, and keep the other half blank, ready for Linux. Once that's done, and XP is up and running, you can reboot and install Linux from CD/DVD, and just tell it to use the unpartitioned space on your hard drive to install itself on.

[QUOTE=Mullet Man]5) Windows XP is pretty user friendly when installing hardware (Modem, Printer, Sound card, etc) is Linux the same way?

Linux is pretty damn good with hardware support - it detected my laptop hardware first time off with no third-party drivers required, whilst XP needed 3 discs to get it all up and running.

If you have a stubborn bit of kit that isn't working, just do a Google for Linux drivers for it. On some distros you will need to compile the drivers yourself (I doubt you'll be very experienced in that area), which is why I recommend you get SuSE - It has a very user-friendly setup tool called YaST, which you can use to install software, drivers, etc.

[QUOTE=Mullet Man]6) After my reformat and installing Linux (if you help me on steps 1-3) will it recognize my FX5200 video card, Creative Soundblaster soundcard, Conexant 56K modem, etc, or is there going to be issues with all this?

Most of your hardware should be fine, but me and a friend did have some problems setting up an nVidia FX5200 on a spare Linux machine we had - it recognized the card, but we needed newer drivers for it to see and enable 3D acceleration.

[QUOTE=Mullet Man]I am pretty educated in Microsoft XP, but I have no clue what Linux is all about! Please reply in a "nooB friendly" manner since this is all new to me!

Linux is by far the most stable OS out there. It's very user-friendly (especially with the KDE desktop), and some people don't even notice the difference between XP and Linux.

If you want to learn more about it, www.distrowatch.com is a good place to start.