Most efficient setup for this network? 11 replies

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The-Bleh-Bleh

Hasselhoff is my hero

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12th December 2006

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#1 10 years ago

We're setting up a network/internet in an addition to our house. We want it cheap and efficient.

I made a pretty picture in MS paint to show what setup our house currently has:

Spoiler: Show
The whole house to the left is the addition. Housewires1.jpg So we need to put in a wire going from room 1 to room 2, providing access to the internet. From the basement, the connection splits off to room 3 and 4.

Here's the gritty details. We can't move the modem. The wireless router we have can only cover the whole house from room 3. We would like wireless + wired on the same network if possible. At room 4 we want some sort of hub so lots of computers can use the network in the attic.

As you can see, this has turned out to be far more complicated than hoped. So, any idea for a setup and what we need to buy?




Kwould

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24th November 2003

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#2 10 years ago

So basically what your saying is you want to add wireless capabilities to your existing wired network? Does your wireless router also have ethernet ports? If the answer to both of these questions is "yes", then all you really need in addition is a wireless access point (median price is around 60 USD) placed probably in "room 3" or perhaps it's (un-numbered in the sketch) left adjacent room. A wireless access point acts as a repeater for a network signal coming from a wireless router. Also, It would be in your best interest to buy an access point of the same brand and protocol (ex. 802.11g) as your existing wireless router.




The-Bleh-Bleh

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#3 10 years ago

Sorry, I mean, we just built the entire left side of the picture. It's not set up at all, except for wires going up through the walls and down to the basement. And yes, the existing router has 4 ports.

The only thing that is on a network at all is the right side of the house, and I'm trying to figure out how to connect the right side to the left side, etc.




Kwould

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#4 10 years ago

In that case, if you want both wired and wireless throughout your home you will need to snake an ethernet wire from the modem in "room 1" to the basement and place your wireless router (with hard wire ethernet ports) in the basement. Then simply connect the wires in the basement to the router and place a matching wireless access point in "room 3". And ouila!




Freyr VIP Member

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6th February 2005

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#5 10 years ago

Or:

Run a cable from Room one to the basement. Terminate the cables on a frame (just for doing it properly, and in case requirements change in the future) and patch them all into a cheap 4 port switch. Put the wireless router in room 3, and put another cheap switch in your loft.

If you have just built that side of the house and its still easy to cable it might be a good idea to run an extra set of cables to those rooms in case you want to run a phone in at a later stage.

Any random fast ethernet switch is perfectly adequate for home use (games etc). Unless you transferring around hundreds of megabytes with some regularity then gig ethernet switches probably aren't worth it. (Unless you see a couple that are fairly cheap.)




The-Bleh-Bleh

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#6 10 years ago

Thanks for the help- I just have a couple more questions. Imagine the following.

Spoiler: Show
modem |_____| [COLOR=White]. . .[COLOR=Black]|[/COLOR][/COLOR] ___|___[COLOR=White] . . . . . . .[/COLOR]__hub 1_[COLOR=White]. . . . . . .[/COLOR] [COLOR=White].[/COLOR]____hub 2_____ | o o o |---------| o o o o |---------| o o o o o o o o | Router [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . [COLOR=Black]| [/COLOR]. . . . .[/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . [COLOR=Black]|[/COLOR][/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . [/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. ..[COLOR=Black]__\_|_[/COLOR][/COLOR]/__ [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . [/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. .[COLOR=Black]|________| [/COLOR][/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . [/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. [COLOR=Black]Wireless router[/COLOR][/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . . . .[/COLOR]

That's the setup I'm looking at doing right now... - Will the internet be accessible from all of the hubs and routers? - Will everything (wireless and wired) be able to connect to the same network? (So, could somebody on hub 2 play a game with somebody on the wireless router?) - Due to so many hubs/routers, could there be network stability issues?

Freyr;4349022Or: If you have just built that side of the house and its still easy to cable it might be a good idea to run an extra set of cables to those rooms in case you want to run a phone in at a later stage.

It's too late to make any changes. I believe we can do that anyway, though. Sadly, the person who wired the house tried to wire a network in parallel... We were going to have ethernet in multiple rooms along with phone. It's all very confusing.




Kwould

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#7 10 years ago

Hubs are passive and generally don't cause conflicts (unless they're malfunctioning). You shouldn't have any network issues coming from them. On the other hand, introducing multiple routers into the same network can cause problems. To be clear, I'm not saying it can't be done or that it is not done on a regular basis in many networks, because it is and it can. I am only saying that having multiple routers in a single network can be a source of network conflicts and to avoid it if at all possible. What you are proposing is probably the most expensive and complicated way to go, something you would see in a medium sized office eviornment rather than a home, but it should work.




Revenge VIP Member

Shizzle my nizzle

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28th July 2004

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#8 10 years ago

Q: Will the internet be accessible from all of the hubs and routers? A: Yes, as long as the wireless router is configured properly (it must know it is connecting to an existing network and not directly to a modem - it's usually called 'access point' mode)

Q: Will everything (wireless and wired) be able to connect to the same network? (So, could somebody on hub 2 play a game with somebody on the wireless router?) A: Yes. All hubs do is repeat signals inbound from one connection to all of the others, so it would be as if every computer is connected to every other computer, which is what lets games work.

Q: Due to so many hubs/routers, could there be network stability issues? A: If you have a computer which needs a fast ping (i.e. a gaming computer) then it should have as small an amount of equipment between it and the internet as possible. A direct connection to the modem would be ideal but isn't always practical. As long as you use fast ethernet (100MBps) or gigabit ethernet (1000MBps) hubs then you'll be fine.

One other thing: you may want to consider using switches instead of hubs if you're planning on having a lot of computers on the network eventually. Switches send home network traffic to its intended destination only whereas hubs broadcast everything they receive to every other computer regardless of its destination. Hubs are hence less secure and create useless network traffic, which can slow down network interface cards in computers and hence slow down everyone's internet connection. This is significant if you're going to be gaming on the internet. Switches are a little more expensive than hubs.




The-Bleh-Bleh

Hasselhoff is my hero

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#9 10 years ago

Thanks a bunch you guys. We ended up getting 100MBps Netgear switches, thanks for the advice. Here's what I've done so far...

Spoiler: Show

modem |_____| [COLOR=White]. . .[COLOR=Black]|[/COLOR][/COLOR] ___|___[COLOR=White] . . . . . . .[/COLOR]_switch 1[COLOR=White].[/COLOR] | o o o |---------| o o o o | Router [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . [COLOR=Black]| [/COLOR]. . . . .[/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . [COLOR=Black]|[/COLOR][/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. . . . . . . . . . [/COLOR] [COLOR=White]. .[COLOR=Black] Desktop [/COLOR][/COLOR]

[COLOR=White][COLOR=Black] The switch seems to get a fine connection to the router, with an always flickering indication light.

However, the connection from the desktop to the switch gives an unconvincing solid indicator light, with a few flickers every now and then. I can't access the network from that desktop. To make it clear, the desktop is 2 floors above the switch, and there were lots of complications in wiring it. So I'm assuming this is almost certainly bad wiring in between the desktop and the switch? [/COLOR][/COLOR]




Freyr VIP Member

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#10 10 years ago

Um. I guess you don't have a cable tester and crimping tools.

A solid greed light on the switch means equipment is connected to the port on the switch, the flickering means that there is traffic on that port. Do you have anything on the port connected to the rest of the network?

I would say its probably the cable. Get the IP address of your router and try pinging it. That should tell you if its a network config issue or not, however it dosen't tell you if its the cable being damaged, the connectors being incorrectly terminated or whatever.




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