Need help with Ubuntu 13 replies

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Silberio VIP Member

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#1 2 years ago

So I performed a clean install of Ubuntu on my laptop, mainly because I'd been wanting to format the thing for a while and I thought why not give it a try.

Everything went perfectly well except that wireless networking doesn't work. I've been looking up help for two days now with no results. I've managed to install 802.11 Broadcom drivers (whatever any of this means) and I think I got the right drivers according what info I've looked up, but I still have no WiFi.

Now, thing is, I'm completely new to this Linux thing. I've ran a few of these sudo commands, but apart from what people have said in different forums, I have no idea exactly what is wrong nor what I have to do to fix it. I have no idea what info to provide, so if any of ya'll might know what could help, let me know what info to get and I'll do it.

All I know so far though, is that it says my network driver is "Unclaimed", which I read somewhere means that it's not recognizing the wireless card or something, but yeah... I have no idea.


qjyUJrq.png



Superfluous Curmudgeon VIP Member

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#2 2 years ago

What version of Ubuntu did you install? The latest non-beta version? Also, do you know what your network adapter is? If not, the model of your laptop?

Linux can be really finicky when it comes to user-installed drivers.




Lysdestic VIP Member

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#3 2 years ago

My Linux is a little rusty, but Wireless drivers are no surprise here.

First thing, I'd suggest hooking in via Ethernet to make your life easier in setting up the wireless drivers.

If you can, run lspci from a terminal so we can see what card you have.

Ubuntu often has proprietary drivers available, look for an app called "additional drivers" once you are wired in via ethernet, are there any available there?




FileTrekker Über Admin

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#4 2 years ago

Honestly, this is the main reason why I stopped using Linux and I see nothing has changed.

It seems user friendly on the surface of things, but you're guaranteed to hit a driver or software problem sooner rather than later, and unless you enjoy BASH shells and copious amounts of Googling, then it really isn't for you.

Spending two days and failing to get something as basic as WiFi working is just Linux through and through IMO.

The main problem with Linux is Linux gets in the way of it. Windows does a good job of just staying our of your way and just working.


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Lysdestic VIP Member

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#5 2 years ago

Yep, pretty much.

I used it for 10+ years (thanks, Sheep...).

It can be your daily OS, but expect to get your hands dirty. Good for learning and all that, but not so much for practicality.




Silberio VIP Member

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#6 2 years ago

It's some real bullshit then. I don't even remember who it was, but a bunch of people recommended me Linux (mainly programmers... One of them my ex's cousin, so it might've been some sorta revenge?) and the whole interface part is really neat, but if the thing is as problematic as you guys say, then jeez.

I mainly wanna use the laptop for studying and surfing the web, nothing more fancy than that. If I get the WiFi thing working, is it recommended for just that or should I just call it a day and switch back to windows?

Superfluous Curmudgeon What version of Ubuntu did you install? The latest non-beta version? Also, do you know what your network adapter is? If not, the model of your laptop?

Linux can be really finicky when it comes to user-installed drivers. [/quote]

[quote=Lysdestic] My Linux is a little rusty, but Wireless drivers are no surprise here.

First thing, I'd suggest hooking in via Ethernet to make your life easier in setting up the wireless drivers.

If you can, run lspci from a terminal so we can see what card you have.

Ubuntu often has proprietary drivers available, look for an app called "additional drivers" once you are wired in via ethernet, are there any available there?

Release 16.04 (I did the lsb_release -a command) I got a  lenovo B50-30 model (2 Chinese chars) 80ES. Network adapter (through lspci): Broadcom Corp. BCM43142 802.11 [14e4:4365] (rev01)

And I had actually found the supposed drivers for this one (which I donwloaded by doing the sudo thing and downloaded bcmwl-kernel-source). I had found some Ubuntu wiki that listed a bunch of drivers + commands to get them for specific adapters.


qjyUJrq.png



Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#7 2 years ago

I've had computers I've installed Linux on with no significant driver problems to speak of. One of the big drawbacks is that everyone writes drivers for Windows. Don't get me wrong, driver support for Linux has gotten a lot better than it was, but that's still kind of a massively uneven playing field. Heck, even with Windows boxes, I've had trouble with pre-built things like laptops - the maker uses some esoteric POS to keep costs down and the only driver that's easy to find is part of the setup they made when they originally sold the system.

It's amazing that it works as well as it does, all considered.




Superfluous Curmudgeon VIP Member

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#8 2 years ago

FileTrekker Honestly, this is the main reason why I stopped using Linux and I see nothing has changed.

It seems user friendly on the surface of things, but you're guaranteed to hit a driver or software problem sooner rather than later, and unless you enjoy BASH shells and copious amounts of Googling, then it really isn't for you.

Spending two days and failing to get something as basic as WiFi working is just Linux through and through IMO.

The main problem with Linux is Linux gets in the way of it. Windows does a good job of just staying our of your way and just working. [/quote] This semester I spent weeks trying to get the Raspian (a Debian variant) OS to connect to the system network this semester. It was a lightweight OS so no GUI for the network settings. For ethernet the IP settings had to be manually set, and I was using an old guide on how to change them. The file I had to modify was there, it just didn't do anything. Turns out there was a newer method which also didn't work, as setting the subnet mask killed things. Then I tried a wireless adapter. This also didn't work, and eventually I think I broke the OS to the point where it no longer booted. I installed a very similar version of Raspian the second time and things just worked, at least for the WiFi. No real reason. Same hardware, almost the same OS version.

Silberio It's some real bullshit then. I don't even remember who it was, but a bunch of people recommended me Linux (mainly programmers... One of them my ex's cousin, so it might've been some sorta revenge?) and the whole interface part is really neat, but if the thing is as problematic as you guys say, then jeez.

Lots of people genuinely recommend Linux - mostly people who have a lot of time to dink around with it but don't yet know that the dinking around never ends. I always am hearing of people turning their backs on that recommendation when they realize this. That said, I'm tempted to try to switch over as my main OS, as I'm a bit pissed off with Windows. Linux is also used for small devices like routers, DVD players, etc almost exclusively. If you aren't going to ever mess around with it, and get it how you want it, it just works.

[quote=Silberio] Release 16.04 (I did the lsb_release -a command) I got a lenovo B50-30 model (2 Chinese chars) 80ES. Network adapter (through lspci): Broadcom Corp. BCM43142 802.11 [14e4:4365] (rev01)

And I had actually found the supposed drivers for this one (which I donwloaded by doing the sudo thing and downloaded bcmwl-kernel-source). I had found some Ubuntu wiki that listed a bunch of drivers + commands to get them for specific adapters.

As far as actually helping you, this looks like it may be helpful, but I'm not sure what the nature of your problem is (error vs. things just not working). It looks like trying to install multiple different drivers can be problematic, and that the old one(s) need to be disabled/uninstalled before you proceed. I think the aforementioned link covers that.




Mikey Über Admin

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#9 2 years ago

I used Ubuntu for years and years, and it was actually great for me. I find that it's not great for laptops which were built for Windows though.

I genuinely had a box which was built from spare parts - and Ubuntu worked great for it - because I had OS agnostic devices. IE, My Graphics Card and Sound Card weren't put into a laptop which was only ever meant to run Windows. 

The devices in these laptops are usually made for Windows and have very little driver support on other platforms, but as others have said.. Linux is great but only if you have the time and patience to sit down and learn the entire OS - from the terminal. Once you've mastered that however, you can do things to all sorts of devices, as most small things like Routers and DVD players do run some form of Linux.

Hell, that ubuntu box right now is powering my home theater system, connected to my TV with wireless access from my phone. 


Mikey - GameFront.com - Lead Developer



NeoRanger

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#10 2 years ago
Silberio I mainly wanna use the laptop for studying and surfing the web, nothing more fancy than that. If I get the WiFi thing working, is it recommended for just that or should I just call it a day and switch back to windows?

I'd stick with Linux. I've used various distros (mainly Debian and Ubuntu derivatives) for a long time and I still use Xubuntu on my ancient netbook. It's fast(er), it's safer and generally more reliable. For light use, I find no reason for anyone to be running Windows.

I use an external wi-fi receiver (nano usb) and I haven't had any problems getting it to connect; the problem with Linux is that it reacts very differently to different hardware; hell, sometimes it reacts differently to the same hardware. Ten years ago I could've helped you, but I've become too complacent since Ubuntu became out-of-the-box, plug'n'play-ready. Having said that, if you do find a solution, I'd recommend sticking with the system.




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