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#1 6 years ago

So I'm still running a Pentium 4. I think it's finally time for a new build. I'm hoping to order by next weekend so I can put this thing together over spring break. I want to keep the total cost <= $1000.

Other considerations: -I may want to run SLI/crossfire in the distant future -The build will be used for both gaming and CPU-intensive tasks (Photoshop, video editing/encoding, compiling, etc.)

CPU: Primary choice: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116504 or Intel Core i5-3470 Ivy Bridge 3.2GHz (3.6GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2500 BX80637i53470 - Newegg.com

CPU cooler: Primary choice: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835233082 or Zalman CNPS14X Pure Aluminum High Performance 140mm Fan Ultra Quiet Interactive Heatpipe Transfer Design CPU Cooler - Newegg.com

Motherboard: Primary choice: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX Intel Motherboard - Newegg.com or GIGABYTE GA-H77-DS3H LGA 1155 Intel H77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard - Newegg.com or ASUS P8Z77-V LK ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS - Newegg.com or ASRock Z77 Pro4 ATX Intel Motherboard - Newegg.com

RAM: Primary choice: G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-1600C9D-16GXM - Newegg.com or 2x: CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CMZ8GX3M1A1600C10 - Newegg.com

GPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=14-125-443&SortField=0&SummaryType=0&Pagesize=10&PurchaseMark=&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&VendorMark=&IsFeedbackTab=true&Page=3#scrollFullInfo or http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814130825

PSU: Primary choice: CORSAIR TX Series CMPSU-650TX 650W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Compatible with Core i7 Power Supply - Newegg.com or CORSAIR TX Series CMPSU-750TX 750W ATX12V v2.3 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Compatible with Core i7 Power Supply - Newegg.com

HDD: Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM003 Internal Hard Drive - Newegg.com

NIC: Rosewill RNX-N150PCe (RNWD-11011) IEEE 802.11b/g/n PCIe 2.0 Wireless Adapter Up to 150Mbps Wireless Data Rates WPA/WPA2 (AES, 64,128,152-WEP with shared-key authentication) WPS (WiFi Protected Setup) - Newegg.com

OS: Windows 7 64 bit

Fans & Case: Supplied by me unless something doesn't work out




D3matt

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#2 6 years ago

I am tempted to say go for the ASUS board if not for the fact that the RAM it comes with is not as good as the G.Skill RAM (The timing is slightly looser). Regardless, I tend to go for motherboards in the $150 range, I don't like to skimp on the motherboard. It's the central component of the system, so it makes sense to make sure it's quality. I would definitely go for one of the two boards that have dual PCIx16 though if you plan on SLI. I am guessing the 650W PSU will be sufficient as well.

I would, however, suggest buying something a bit more reputable than SPARKLE for the video card. If it's worth spending $210 on, it's working spending another $10 to buy quality.




Kamikazee

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#3 6 years ago

Looks good, although I don't see any SSD.

While the I5 is a good CPU I think that in the next two years the new consoles will shift focus to CPUs with more than 4 cores. Just look at the benchmarks for Crysis 3, where the AMD CPUs do surprisingly well due to their many cores. If you get a 4-core/thread CPU now its gaming performance may disappoint you in a year or so.




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#4 6 years ago

I would still stick with the quad core for the time being. If he finds it's super necessary to buy a new CPU he may, but I still feel like at present time the quad core will be more than sufficient for everything he wants to do.

As for the motherboard, I recommend the Extreme4. I have had no issues with mine. And having the temperature/code indicator, as well as the CMOS/Reset switches ON the motherboard are features that should be on any motherboard.

I also second getting an SSD, even if it's a 64gb SSD. Although, you can find some of the Crucial SSD's with lower than a 1$/1GB ratio, so you should keep an eye on the sales.




cHa0s_&amp;_dIs0rDeR

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#5 6 years ago

I'd say drop down to this heatsink to save some money: XIGMATEK Gaia SD1283 CPU Cooler bracket included dual fan push pull compatible - Newegg.com

Then put the extra cash into a 3570k and overclock it.

Out of those motherboards the Asrock Extreme4 is a solid budget board.

The 650w psu will also me MORE than enough. You could back down to a quality 450-500w psu and still have tons of room for overclocking and extra components.

I also have to give a huge +1 to an SSD for the system. Even if it is only for the OS and a program or two it can make a big difference.




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#6 6 years ago

Thanks everyone for the advice. I updated my OP with changes based on suggestions made. As far as some of the things you brought up: 1) Just how much does a difference of 1 or 2 for memory latency affect actual performance? 2) I agree a SSD would be great, but that would push me over my budget at this point in time. I may shoot for one on Black Friday or another big sale though. :P 3) I also agree an 8 thread or 6 core CPU would be nice, but I want to stick with Intel, and again, it is more than I want to spend - the lowest cost Ivy Bridge i7 is $90 over my original CPU choice. 4) What's all the hate with Sparkle? Is it terrible customer service, or bad products in general, or both?




D3matt

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#7 6 years ago
Anchovy Casserole;5684258Thanks everyone for the advice. I updated my OP with changes based on suggestions made. As far as some of the things you brought up: 1) Just how much does a difference of 1 or 2 for memory latency affect actual performance? 2) I agree a SSD would be great, but that would push me over my budget at this point in time. I may shoot for one on Black Friday or another big sale though. :P 3) I also agree an 8 thread or 6 core CPU would be nice, but I want to stick with Intel, and again, it is more than I want to spend - the lowest cost Ivy Bridge i7 is $90 over my original CPU choice. 4) What's all the hate with Sparkle? Is it terrible customer service, or bad products in general, or both?

1) I don't know how much of a difference it actually makes, but if you can get better performance for a negligible cost increase, why not? I have been told that tighter timings will give better performance increases than higher frequency. 4) Not so much any particular hate, it's just that I don't recommend shopping lesser-known bargain brands for expensive components.




Kamikazee

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#8 6 years ago
Anchovy Casserole;5684258Thanks everyone for the advice. I updated my OP with changes based on suggestions made. As far as some of the things you brought up: 1) Just how much does a difference of 1 or 2 for memory latency affect actual performance? 2) I agree a SSD would be great, but that would push me over my budget at this point in time. I may shoot for one on Black Friday or another big sale though. :P 3) I also agree an 8 thread or 6 core CPU would be nice, but I want to stick with Intel, and again, it is more than I want to spend - the lowest cost Ivy Bridge i7 is $90 over my original CPU choice. 4) What's all the hate with Sparkle? Is it terrible customer service, or bad products in general, or both?

RAM frequency and latency won't give you a lot of performance (from what I remember less than 1% in most gaming scenarios), it may help with overclocking though. For gaming you don't need more than 8gb of RAM. A SSD is the best investment in terms of performance/dollar you can make, get a cheap 128gb SSD for starters, compared to the overall budget that shouldn't be so bad, especially if you save a bit on RAM or other components. Getting it now will also save you the time you'll need later on to transfer your OS from HDD to SSD. As for the CPU, I suppose you can still upgrade to a 8threaded Intel CPU later on, the I5 CPU should work quite well for most applications within the next 1-2 years.




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#9 6 years ago

Thanks for the suggestions. I ended up getting the above build with the exception of the GPU (which I had to swap for the 2nd option) and the addition of a Samsung 128 Gb SSD. Before I put it all together, is there anything I should know about the configuration/setup that may be new since the last time I put a computer together 6+ years ago?




Kamikazee

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#10 6 years ago
Anchovy Casserole;5685079Thanks for the suggestions. I ended up getting the above build with the exception of the GPU (which I had to swap for the 2nd option) and the addition of a Samsung 128 Gb SSD. Before I put it all together, is there anything I should know about the configuration/setup that may be new since the last time I put a computer together 6+ years ago?

Good choice.

Assembling the PC shouldn't be too different from the last time. With modern SSDs and HDDs you should try not to bend the SATA cables too much. Here is a little guide to applying thermal paste to multi core CPUs: Arctic Silver, Inc. - IntelĀ® Application Methods

If you use a relatively modern version of Windows (7 or later) most of the configuration necessary for SSDs should be done automatically. But better read a guide on what to (not) to do with SSDs anyway (for example, you should deactivate disc defrag). Make sure to choose the right options in BIOS (enable AHCI) for your SSD before installing windows or anything else.