New PC / ASUS Optimal Mode 8 replies

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FileTrekker Über Admin

I'm spending a year dead for tax reasons.

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#1 4 years ago

Well after many, many, many years, FileTrekker got an Upgrade.

Modest new PC but it's enough for me to get rid of the Xbox 360, it's an Intel Core i5 4570 3.2 GHz with 8GB of Ram and a Nvidia GTX 660 Ti graphics card.

Anyway, I'm very happy with it except for one thing. I had some very minor coil whine and I heard disabling Intel Speedstep can stop it, so I went into the BIOS, and instead of doing that I saw an option called 'ASUS Optimal Mode' (I have an ASUS motherboard) - the other options where normal and energy saving.

Anyway since setting it to optimal mode the coil whine has stopped so I'm fairly happy about that, but performance does not seem any different (still great) so, I'm just wondering, does anyone know what ASUS Optimal Mode actually does?

I'm having difficulty getting a direct answer out of the Google so I wonder if anyone here knows?


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



MrFancypants Forum Admin

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7th December 2003

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#2 4 years ago

I suppose that mode either overclocks your PC or enables some options useful for overclocking. You could look if the CPU is still running at 3.2 Ghz to check for overclocking. Maybe your motherboard's manual can tell you a bit about that mode?

Anyway, in my experience coil whine is usually something you get with old hardware. If you bought a new motherboard I'd treat it as a sign of bad construction or of a shop sending you a refurbished board. I don't think I ever had a new board that produced enough coil noise to be audible over the fans. Maybe it is normal with Asus boards these days though (not sure, I thought they had a pretty good reputation).

Congrats on the new rig :)




FileTrekker Über Admin

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#3 4 years ago

Yeah, wasn't sure what to make of the coil whine, it's not very loud so certainly don't feel like RMA'ing the system over it, and as I say, changing that setting has seemingly stopped it anyway. I heard certain combinations of cards / mobos and CPU's can cause coil whine with seemingly no known reason why.

ANYWAY

CPU is still at the usual 3.20GHz anyway, so, not sure what to make of it. Might mess around more tomorrow. Cheers dude.


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Goody. VIP Member

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#4 4 years ago

Had a quick look at what this mode does and it looks like Fancy was spot on in that it is a auto overclock mode. That is has not added any speed to your system does not mean it hasn't worked and as these auto modes also mess around with the voltage I would make a note of these things in the bios with a before and after. I would also run a benchmark software like 3d mark on a before and after as well just to see if it make any difference under stress.




FileTrekker Über Admin

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#5 4 years ago

Well I certainly benchmark a lot better with it in optimal mode.

I've done a little bit of overclocking to my graphics card too, yet for some reason my baseline in passmark is a little below the average for others with my CPU and graphics card....

Not sure what to make of that.


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Goody. VIP Member

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#6 4 years ago

Pay no attention to those base marks as your trying to compare to serial overclockers who have the best of everything to get the best scores. Install cpu z that will give you a better look at what exactly this mode is doing. I am not a fan of auto overclock software even when it is done at the bios stage but they are safe enough and it sounds like it is doing its job but if it is not registering a speed increase then voltage needs to be checked as throwing to much voltage at your cpu will shorten its life. CPU-Z CPUID - System & hardware benchmark, monitoring, reporting




Andron Taps Forum Mod

Faktrl is Best Pony

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#7 4 years ago

I believe you can run all the current i7 chips on 1.5v and still get a good # of years out of them.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



kow_ciller

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#8 4 years ago
Adrian Ţepeş;5733191I believe you can run all the current i7 chips on 1.5v and still get a good # of years out of them.

Nerp.

I wouldn't go over 1.4v on any of the current chips for daily use.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#9 4 years ago

Mmm, I guess I'm thinking of the motherboard reviews.

Atm, I believe I'm only doing 1.15v for 4.1 ghz


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.