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kow_ciller

Gettin' hardware chilly

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16th June 2004

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#1 9 years ago

775 Overclocking guide

I've pretty much written a guide for someone new to Overclocking. Also know that the steps for overclocking on the 775 platform apply to all chips: Quads, Duals, 45nm, 65nm. This guide is meant to be used for most modern 775 machines.

I wrote the guide originally using a E8400/ Asus P5Q-E. I will be going over OC basics, and some advanced things as well. I take no responsibility for what you do with the information in this guide. Overclock your hardware at your own risk.

Overlocking Basics

Before you start, read your motherboard manual and get comfortable with your hardware. Know how to reset your BIOS in the event that you are too aggressive in your CPU settings and it doesn't complete a POST (or make sure that your motherboard resets itself for you). Some motherboards reset automatically if you switch off the power supply for 30 seconds or so. Others require you to move a jumper to reset them, press a button, or remove the bios battery.

The basic formula you need to know for the CPU speed is:

CPU Speed = CPU Multiplier x FSB FSB = Front side bus.

Example: The E8400 runs at a factory setting of 3.0 GHz. That's the product of a 9x multiplier and a 333 MHz FSB (quad pumped it's 1333 MHz but we're not quad pumping these numbers). So CPU Speed = 9 x 333 which is 2,997 MHz or 3.0 GHz.

Below is a list of Intel chips. Most of them have a "locked" multiplier which means it can't go above a certain value (9x in this case).But it can always be lowered to achieve the same frequency. For example, in order to achieve 3.0ghz, a lower Multiplier of 6 and a raised FSB speed of 500mhz still achieves our stock clock of 3.0ghz. Generally, the best way to increase the CPU speed beyond the stock value is by raising the FSB. There are chips that have the ability to raise the multiplier beyond the stock speed. These are Intel's "Extreme" chips like the QX9650 or X6850 and have “unlocked" multipliers. This means you can raise the multipliers above the stock value. These chips are often noticed by the X in their chip number (ie: Q6700 -> QX6700).

For reference, here are all Intel LGA775 offerings as of July 2009:

Quads: QX9775: 8.0x400 = 3.20 GHz

Q9300: 7.5x333 = 2.50 GHz Q9450: 8.0x333 = 2.67 GHz Q9550: 8.5x333 = 2.83 GHz QX9650/QX6850/ Q9650: 9.0x333 = 3.00 GHz

Q6600: 9.0x266 = 2.40 GHz QX/Q6700: 10.0x266 = 2.67 GHz QX6800: 11.0x266 = 2.93 GHz

Duals: E6540/50: 7.0x333 = 2.33 GHz E6750: 8.0x333 = 2.67 GHz E8190/8200: 8.0x333 = 2.67 GHz E6850/8400: 9.0x333 = 3.00 GHz E8500: 9.5x333 = 3.16 GHz E8300: 8x333 = 2.83 GHz E8600: 10x333: 3.33ghz

E6400/20: 8.0x266 = 2.13 GHz E6600: 9.0x266 = 2.40 GHz E7200: 9.5x266 = 2.53 GHz E6700: 10.0x266 = 2.67 GHz X6800: 11.0x266 = 2.93 GHz

E2140: 8.0x200 = 1.60 GHz E2160/E4300: 9.0x200 = 1.80 GHz E6300/20: 7.0x200 = 1.86 GHz E2180/E4400: 10.0x200 = 2.00 GHz E2200/E4500: 11.0x200 = 2.20 GHz E2220/E4600: 12.0x200 = 2.40 GHz E4700: 13.0x200 = 2.60 GHz X7800: 13.0x200 = 2.60 GHz X7900: 14.0x200 = 2.80 GHz

My first core2 system was based on a e2180 at 9x200= 1.80 GHz . I found the max it can go when cooled with air is 9x365=3.285 GHz (82% over factory speeds). Every chip is different. You might be the unlucky owner of a chip that just doesn’t overclock very high at all, or you could be very lucky and get a golden chip that will hit extremely high speeds.

Overclocking is more complicated than just adjusting two settings in the BIOS, because as you increase the FSB, you'll also need to increase the core voltage (Vcore) which is the actual amount of voltage going to the processor. As well, you may have to increase the other voltages on the board like: memory, FSB, north bridge (NB), south bridge (SB), or ICH chipset. There are also other settings that control your memory that may need tweaking as well. There is no need to worry about those settings for now. The board can manage these automatically which is what you should do as you first get into things. When you first decide on what frequency you wish to achieve, you'll want to minimize voltage bumps and messing with other settings for now. Stability is not a massive concern, but make sure being able to POST and boot into windows is your #1 priority for now.

Pre-Overclocking Checklist

Before you start overclocking, you'll want to go over your system and make sure that everything in your rig will stand up to the stresses of overclocking.

1. Motherboard Generally you'll want something that will be overclocking friendly. These motherboards will generally offer greater stability, as well as more features specifically for control of components during the overclocking process. A free motherboard that came with your CPU is not going to achieve this. You'll want something more on the high-end range of things. Here are a few chipsets you should look out for if you intend to overclock:

High-end: X48 (generally best for dual-cores) X38 P-45(generally best for Quad-cores) 790i

Mid-range: P-35 P-43 780i 680i

Low-end: 650i p31

What to Avoid: Anything with onboard video

2. Cooling Cooling is an extremely important thing to consider, since you're asking a processor to run faster than it was rated to run at. A quad core chip will generally produce twice the heat of a dual core chip, so if you're using the Intel Stock HSF, you'll probably want to upgrade to something better. This is not to say, however, that a dual-core chip will be fine on a stock heatsink either. While many people will swear by different coolers and different technologies I can tell you that I am using a Thermalright Ultra-120 Extreme and am very happy with it.

Here is an extremely useful website that specializes in comparing heatsinks against each other.

3. Memory Another thing you will need to look at when overclocking is your memory. Getting memory with good timings is a good start, and while I will not suggest specific memory I will suggest looking at memory with good timings, or finding memory with D9 chips on them.

DDR2-800 (PC2-6400) 4-4-4-12 DDR2-1066 (PC2-8500) 5-5-5-15

• The first part explains itself (DDR2 memory). • The number after it is the data transfer rate. Simply divide it by 2 to get the maximum FSB speed for which the module is rated. Example: 800/2 = 400 MHz. Therefore, DDR2-800 can work on systems with a FSB of up to 400 MHz (although most ram can run at much over its rated speed). • The PC2-XXXX is designation denoting theoretical bandwidth in MB/s. Some memory manufactures use this instead of the DDR2-xxx designation. You can calculate it for any FSB you want by simply taking the FSB and multiplying by 16 (rounded in some cases). Example using a 400 MHz FSB: 400x16=6400. So you’d need at least PC2-6400 to run on a FSB of 400 MHz.

The numbers after that are the main timings (clock cycles). In general, the lower these numbers are, the faster the memory. For more on memory timings, see this page.

DDR3-1333 (PC3-10666) 9-9-9-24 DDR3-1600 (PC3-12800) 7-7-7-20

• The first part explains itself (DDR3 memory). • The number after it is the data transfer rate. Simply divide it by 4 to get the maximum FSB speed for which the module is rated. Example: 1600/4 = 400 MHz. Therefore, DDR3-1600 can work on systems with a FSB of up to 400 MHz (although most ram can run at much over its rated speed). • The PC3-XXXXX is designation denoting theoretical bandwidth in MB/s. Some memory manufactures use this instead of the DDR3-xxxx designation. You can calculate it for any FSB you want by simply taking the FSB and multiplying by 32 (rounded in some cases). Example using a 400 MHz FSB: 400x32=12800. So you’d need at least PC3-12800 to run on FSB of 400 MHz.

4. Power Supply There are really two major factors to consider when selecting a power supply:

1) Quality of the PSU 2) Power output

If you are looking at a particular PSU I would check out www.jonnyguru.com

I gave a few examples of how much power each component uses:

Component Best Case Worst Case Power Supply 5-15W 40-60 W Motherboard 10-15 W 30-50 W Processor 12-30 W 60-250 W RAM 5-15 W 30-50 W HDD 3-5 W (2.5") 10-15 W (3.5") GFX Card 3-10 W (on MB) 25-380 W (PCI Express) Total 38-90 W 195-805 W

There are many good calculators out there to determine your estimated power usage for your system. Such as this one.

5. Required Software Here are few suggested utilities you'll need

General System Info CPU-Z is a great app to display your current settings including vcore, FSB, multiplier, RAM settings, etc. This one is a must-have.

CPU Stress Testing Prime 95 v25.6 is a great app for stress testing. It is very efficient at generating CPU loads equally across all your cores. There are few other apps that will stress a system as a hard as p95. Alternatively, if you’re using a 64-bit o/s you can download the 64-bit version of prime95 v25.6.

CoreDamage is very useful to determine the efficiency of your cooling system. This application will completely load your CPU and will make it run hotter than most other programs (anything from 4-20 degrees hotter than with Prime95). However it is not such a good test of overall system stability.

Of course, both these programs will push your CPU harder than it will likely ever have to work during normal usage (except if you are converting audio/video, or using some distributed computing program). However, running these programs just ensures that your CPU will not cause a BSOD or sudden reboot when you need it least.

System Monitoring There are several options for processor core temp and system temp monitoring.

These first two will give you just the core temperatures (not system temps, voltages, etc.):

Core Temp (freeware) Real Temp (freeware)

The next three will give you core temps plus many other temps, voltages, fan RPMs, etc.:

HWMonitor (freeware highly recommended) Speedfan (freeware) Everest Ultimate ($$$)

Memory Testing (optional but can help rule-out bad memory) Memtest86+ is a great piece of software that will test your memory. Download the bootable ISO and allow it to test your system for 6-24 h.

Please do NOT trust the temperatures that your motherboard's free temp utility reads. "PC Probe 2" that comes with Asus boards really sucks because it's not measuring your core temps and instead reads the motherboard sensor on the backside of the motherboard(same with all other companies' utilities)

BIOS

Not all boards are the same. Not all boards use the same bios version, and even ones that do dont always use the same names for everything. You will be on your own to figure out what specific settings do and how they influence your system.

Although, here are a few common settings MOST boards should have but not all will.

Modify Ratio Support - disabled, but you can if you want to select a different multiplier. This will allow you to lower your multiplier if you want to. While some may argue that trying to achieve 3.0ghz by using 6x500 will be the best, it is generally safe to say that you want to get as high of a frequency as you can with as little FSB as possible C1E – Intel’s so-called enhanced halt state. This is a power savings option. At first disable, but as you continue to push your system and if it continues to remain stable keep it on (lowers your voltages and frequency at idle to save power). Max CPUID value limit – disable unless you’re running an older O/S like Windows NT. Intel Virtualization– disable unless you're running virtual machines or need software that utilizes virtual machines.

CPU TM function – enable. This option helps you protect your chip while you are overclocking to make sure you're not damaging your processor. Although, it can be disabled later if it is hurting your overclock and your temperatures are fine.

Execute Disable Bit - enable. Helps in XP/Vista with virus protections

PECI – This stands for Platform Environment Control Interface - disable or enable. This affects how your DTS (Digital Thermal Sensors) report the core temps of your CPU.

SpeedStep - Automatically lowers the multiplier from its max. (9x for the e8400) to 6x when the machine is idle. The result is less power consumption and heat production. It goes back up to 9x when you start to get a CPU load. Disable initially, enable later on and see if the system remains stable. This is a power savings option.

C-state - Allows your motherboard to shut off parts of your processor in order to save energy. Disable at first, then try testing later to see if computer remains stable . This is a power savings option.

Why should you care about power savings? For one, it will lower processor temperatures, and secondly it will help lower your power bill.

A big thing you will want to do is input the stock memory settings for your memory into the bios. Youwant to minimize the number of variables to deal with on a first time overclocking. Most of the time you can find the timings on the packaging or on the manufactures website.

CPU Frequency - This is the FSB in MHz. Set it to whatever you’re planning to multiply by 9x (333 in my case). DRAM Frequency - This the speed your RAM will run. Make sure you don’t exceed the amount for which your specific RAM is rated(at first).

Most good boards will offer several fsb:dram dividers. Some common ones are listed below. Assuming that you’re using a 333 MHz FSB the ratios are:

FSB : DRAM 1:1 = 333 MHz : 667 MHz 4:5 = 333 MHz : 833 MHz 2:3 = 333 MHz : 1,000 MHz 5:8 = 333 MHz : 1,066 MHz 3:5 = 333 MHz : 1,111 MHz 1:2 = 333 MHz : 1,333 MHz

Now, if you’re running @ a 400 MHz FSB, the ratios become: Code:

FSB : DRAM 1:1 = 400 MHz : 800 MHz 4:5 = 400 MHz : 1,000 MHz 2:3 = 400 MHz : 1,200 MHz 5:8 = 400 MHz : 1,280 MHz 3:5 = 400 MHz : 1,333 MHz 1:2 = 400 MHz : 1,600 MHz

You can calculate these yourself with this formula: Code: DRAM Final Clockspeed = (2 x FSB)/Divider Example, 2/3 divider @ 400 MHz FSB: (2 x 400 MHz)/(2/3) = 1,200 MHz

Most of the time you will want to achieve the highest divider that you can but still being the most stable. If you are going for a pure clockspeed using the lowest/most stable divider is the best idea. PCI Express Frequency – Set this to 100 MHz. Do NOT change this unless doing extreme overclocking(or using a IDE hard drive).

PCI Clock Synchronization - Use 33.33 MHz here. If you leave this on auto the PCI clock speed will change as your FSB changes.

Spread Spectrum - disable. Memory Voltage - Read the specs for your memory. Most DIMMS can use up to 2.2v. However, you can damage memory if you use too much voltage in them.

CPU VCoreTHIS IS KEY! This single BIOS setting will have the largest effect on your processor’s operating temperatures and stability! You need to put enough voltage into a chip where it runs stable, yet doesn't create too much heat and add the potential for frying a chip.

You might want to check, Intel's Processor Finder to see what Intel Recommends for your processor. Generally, you can run 10% over the "max" and still be safe.

Leaving the VCORE “auto” ALWAYS over-estimates, but for your first boot, just leave it on auto.

Disable unwanted features A big thing to look out for is your motherboard features. While its cool to have firewire, 20 USB ports and other things, do you really need them? If not its a good idea to disable them in bios since most things can limit your overclock. Common things to disable are

Serial ports Onboard sound (if using a sound card) Firewire Extra LAN ports

The next section will help test the stability of your new overclock. While you may be able to be able to boot your 3ghz processor at 5ghz, will it be stable enough to play your favorite game for hours on end?

Okay, save your settings and hopefully your machine will complete the POST.

If it doesn’t, and assuming you set your voltages to Auto, some common reasons are:

• Memory voltage too low • Memory timings too aggressive • FSB too aggressive

If you complete the POST, and make it into windows without a blue screen or reboot that's a good sign. Now on to the testing. Now that you're in Windows, load up CoreTemp or HWMonitor and have a look at your core temps when idle.

The idle temperatures should be under 50*C. Anything over that and you're asking for trouble.

Let's stop here and figure out what the red-line for temps should be,while some people say different things, I have found as long as you stay under 80*C at absolute maximum full load you'll be fine. If you want to find your absolute maximum load temperature I would suggest using core damage to do so.

I like to keep my core temps under 75 °C. If you don’t care about the longevity of your chip, you can likely use higher numbers. I have read about people running their chips right up to the factory shutdown/auto throttle down temp. It’s your chip.

Load up CPU-Z to see what your vcore is at idle and under load.

On most boards you'll notice that the value is lower than what you set in bios. This is accounted due to "vdroop" this is normal and true for all boards.

Stress Testing and Minimizing Your voltages

The goal of stress testing is two fold: 1) To arrive at a stress test stable system 2) To minimize your voltages and reduce heat throughout your system.

While everyone will disagree with whats "stable". Generally I suggest running Core damage for a couple of hours. Then giving the PC an hour cool-down and running prime 95 for 1-6hrs. Then if you still want to test more try orthos small block run.

When/if you get an error (and if you keep increasing the clock speeds, then you will), you’ll need to either back off on the operating conditions (FSB or multiplier) or add some voltage to your vcores in order to achieve a stable overclock.

Once you have achieved a stable overclock it is now time to go in reverse and try to minimize your vcore settings. Reboot and go into the BIOS’ section where you can control your CPU and MB voltages. Try lowering voltages little by little and run stress-tests again.

More sections will come later.




*Daedalus

A Phoenix from the ashes

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18th April 2006

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#2 9 years ago

From a quick read-through:

QX9650 listed twice, I'll assume one was meant to be the QX9770. The timings on the DDR3 RAM are reversed. Most RAM is 2.1V max.

Nice guide though.




Chocu1a

Feel my heat, Heavens on fire.

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3rd August 2005

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#3 9 years ago

Kow? are you a member of Guru3d?




Sgt. D. Pilla

Uber Geek

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#4 9 years ago

10% over maximum limit for VCore? You sure? that's nearly 1.5v for the E8400 then...

10% of 1.36 = 0.136 1.36 + 0.136 = 1.49600




kow_ciller

Gettin' hardware chilly

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16th June 2004

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#5 9 years ago

Count_Chocu1a;4953142Kow? are you a member of Guru3d?[/QUOTE]

No, I am not. And have never used the Guru3d forums. I got help from a member outside of the forum though.

The_Daedalus;4953109From a quick read-through:

QX9650 listed twice, I'll assume one was meant to be the QX9770. The timings on the DDR3 RAM are reversed. Most RAM is 2.1V max.

Nice guide though.

I have the QX9650 and the Q9650 on there. And the QX9770 was listed twice on accident. Also, most ram is rated at 2.1v stock but it is advised to not run over 2.2v unless you're doing benching runs or pushing it to its absolute max with additional cooling.

[QUOTE=Sgt. D. Pilla;4953173]10% over maximum limit for VCore? You sure? that's nearly 1.5v for the E8400 then...

10% of 1.36 = 0.136 1.36 + 0.136 = 1.49600

10% over is generally acceptable for most chips. While its a little different for 45nm chips having 10% extra in 65nm chips will cause no harm at all if you have proper cooling. I have seen numerous people running 1.6v+ into their chips on water 24/7 and dont have a problem. Although, you can generally run around 1.49v into 45nm chips and not have problems if you have aggressive air cooling.




Chocu1a

Feel my heat, Heavens on fire.

45,365 XP

3rd August 2005

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#6 9 years ago

Nice guide. The only reason I asked was I thought you might have written the one over there, too: HOWTO: Overclock C2D Quads and C2D Duals




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#7 9 years ago
Count_Chocu1a;4953519Nice guide. The only reason I asked was I thought you might have written the one over there, too: HOWTO: Overclock C2D Quads and C2D Duals

It's practically copied word for word. :/




kow_ciller

Gettin' hardware chilly

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#8 9 years ago

Count_Chocu1a;4953519Nice guide. The only reason I asked was I thought you might have written the one over there, too: HOWTO: Overclock C2D Quads and C2D Duals[/QUOTE]

I know him over on OCF and he suggested for me to use the layout.

[QUOTE=missing.string;4953526]It's practically copied word for word. :/

Thanks for the threadcrap. really appreciate it.




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#9 9 years ago

kow_ciller;4953554I know him over on OCF and he suggested for me to use the layout.

Thanks for the threadcrap. really appreciate it.

Apologies for that, it just looked weird at the time.

Very comprehensive guide though. :)




Chocu1a

Feel my heat, Heavens on fire.

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#10 9 years ago

OCF=Over Clocking Forums? I have never been there...I might look it up. I always love a new forum:) I wasn't trying to thread crap on you, though. I honestly thought you two were the same. I used that guide to oc my old e8400 to 4.0. It worked very well. I am going to try to bump my q9550 up past 3.4 in a few weeks. I need to get some better case fans, though. I hope to get at at least 3.8. I don't really care for the 750i board I am using. I hear the Gigabyte Ga-EP45-UD3R is a great overclocker. I can't decide whether or not to pick one up. I might get it for when I switch to windows 7 in October.




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