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redgroupclan

is gay.

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16th August 2008

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#1 4 years ago

I was troubleshooting a faulty disk drive that plugs into my laptop via USB. The only thing I hadn't tried was messing with the plugin next to the drives USB port. I noticed that my guitar pedal power cord (the adapter says input 120V output 9V or 3V) could fit in so I plugged the cord in then plugged the drives USB into my Y510p. The laptop immediately shut off and now when I try to turn it on absolutely nothing happens except the power light and caps lock light coming on. The keyboard doesn't even light up.

Is there any hope or did I fucking break my $1000 laptop that is pretty much my only reason for living?

I'm such an idiot. Hindsight bias is asking me how did I not see that this was a bad idea.

If I just lost the only thing that gives me entertainment I think I might jump off a bridge.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

Faktrl is Best Pony

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#2 4 years ago

Wait...you plugged what into where exactly?


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



redgroupclan

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#3 4 years ago

I plugged a power cord into the power cord socket on my disk drive, then plugged the disk drives USB cord into my laptops USB port.




kow_ciller

Gettin' hardware chilly

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16th June 2004

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#4 4 years ago

Sounds like you killed the laptop

I'd yank the battery and try to boot it up w/o the battery but it likely toasted the motherboard




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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7th December 2003

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#5 4 years ago

Sounds bad, although I'm a bit surprised that a power surge would be transmitted through the USB cable and destroy the PC. Don't they put fuses into drives with external power supply?

If you are lucky the damage is contained to some section of the motherboard such as the power supply. It'll probably be an expensive repair as you'd have to find and replace the damaged components. Replacing the motherboard might be cheaper, assuming other components weren't also damaged.

edit: some types of insurance cover damage to PCs from lightning-strike related power surges. Just saying.




D3matt

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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20th November 2007

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#6 4 years ago

I have a difficult time believing that "9V or 3V" (Which one is it?) would be enough to backfeed over a USB port and kill a laptop. Most drives have 12V supplies anyway, and even if it was a 5V power supply and you overvolted it, there's no reason a well-designed drive should've been able to kill your laptop like that. For that matter there's no reason the external power supply should even connect to the USB circuits, the USB power itself provides plenty of power for the interface.

I'd be very curious what brand this drive was, so as to avoid them in the future. This sounds like a huge design flaw in the drive and I would call up the company and knocks some heads together.




redgroupclan

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#7 4 years ago

Yeah, if I remembered what drive it was I'd go on Newegg and write a bad review for it. The reason this whole thing started is because that thing started screwing up in the first place.

It's 9V or 3V because the adapter says "Output1" and "Output2".

Unfortunately I didn't think I needed insurance Fancypants.




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#8 4 years ago

If it's a purpose built external drive, could be that the logic board which sits inside the drive casing and interfaces between the actual SATA port on the drive itself and the external USB connection/power supply was poorly designed - in which case it may be possible that something may have arced internally or otherwise caused a short somewhere. Standard PC USB ports are rated at ~5v/500mA, so anything wildly outside that spec would probably cause problems for whatever is connected at the other end, given that the ports/controllers are not designed to handle such high loads.

If it's any consolation, not so long ago I blew up a 3TB external drive (losing ~2.5TB of data along the way...always back your shit up, kids) by accidentally connecting the wrong power brick to it when I was moving house. (In my defence, the brick for my G27 and the brick for the HDD were physically identical.)

Pumped 24 volts / ~2amps into a standard 12v input...there may have been a small fire...




D3matt

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#9 4 years ago

redgroupclan;5737103Yeah, if I remembered what drive it was I'd go on Newegg and write a bad review for it. The reason this whole thing started is because that thing started screwing up in the first place.

It's 9V or 3V because the adapter says "Output1" and "Output2".

Unfortunately I didn't think I needed insurance Fancypants.

You don't still have the drive to check the model?